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Full text of "The twentieth century cook book"

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THE LIBRARY 

OF 

THE UNIVERSITY 
OF CALIFORNIA 

LOS ANGELES 



work and worry. Give 
us your next order for 

Ice Cream or Cake 

and be convinced 



2148 Center Street 
Berkley 3642 



2447 Telegraph Avenue 
Berkeley 1 100 



OAKLAN D BERKELEY 

1209 Broadway Shattuck and Kittridge 



Sunset Grocery Co. 

> 

Leading Grocers 

Specials every week 
Unfailing courtesy 

our windows for Specials 
Solicitors at your service 
Everything in Delicatessen line 
and Coffees our specialty 



We make our own Bread and Cakes 

Try our Health and Nut Bread 

Your patronage solicited 

Phone Berkeley 6295 



Grant Ave. at Post St. 



San Francisco 




KIVIT 

GOODS 



At Moderate Prices 




The fact that we manufacture 
practically all Knit Goods we sell, 
puts us in an eiiviatle position 
before the buying public. Our 
Underwear and Hosiery Depart- 
ments are the choice of discrim- 
inating people. Biggest values 
moderately priced. Always the 
correct styles and best qualities. 

We Specialize in SILK HOSIERY 
at 50c, $1.00, $1.50 and $10.00. 

UNDERWEAR (Over 200 varie- 
ties) from 5c to $25.00. 

SWEATER COATS In addition 
to our own makes, "G. & M." 
brands, we also import the 
finest soft Llamas, Angoras and 
leading European silks; coats 
from $2.00, $3.00, $5.00, $6.53, 
SV.50 to $30.00. 

Bathing Suits. 
Knitted pure 
worsted suits 
as well as 
the prevailing 
styles in Sea 
Island Serge, 
Alpaca, Mo- 
hair and the 
finest durable 
silks. Suits 
from $1.85, 
$2.50, $3.00, 
$4.00, $5.00, 
$6.00 to $30. 





INFANTS' AND CHILDREN'S KNITTED AF- 
FAREIi Underwear, Hosiery, Sacqu.es, Booties, 
Xieggins, Caps, Toques, Vests, etc. A most 
complete assortment at prices to suit every 
purso. 

MEN'S KNIT GOODS Underwear, Sweater Coats, 
Bathing Suits, Bath Robes, Slippers, Pajamas 
and Night Shirts, Sox, Gym. Apparel, etc. 




Grant Ave. At Po& St. 

San Francisco 



The Store lor Quality Stoves 




Clark 

Jewel 

Gas Ranges 

and 

Water 

Heaters 



Agents for Majestic Steel Ranges and 

Bridge & Beach Co.'s " Superior Coal 

Ranges and Water Heaters" 



IDEAL 

Aluminum 

Tireless 

Cook 

Stove 




The Stove and Housefurnishing Store 



The Best Grocery 

under New Management 



PROMPT DELIVERY 
AND LOW PRICES 



Telegraph at Bancroft 

! TEL. BERKELEY 6330 i 



> 



W. W. Nichols S. V. Chown 

Nichols & Chown 
GROCERS 

HARDWARE VEGETABLES 

College and Russell 
Telephone Berkeley 970 



If 



you soil your clothes 
when cooking 

Send them to us 



MARSHALL STEEL CO. 

Expert Dry Cleaners and Dyers 
2124 Center Street Berkeley 



LONDON AND LANCASHIRE FIRE 
INSURANCE CO., LTD. 

Of Liverpool, Eng. 

ORIENT INSURANCE COMPANY 

Of Hartford, Conn. 

Pacific Department, 332 Pine Street, San Francisco. 

Sam B. Hoy, Manager. Qeo. Ormond Smith, Agency Supt. 

W. B. Hopkins, Local Secretary. 



FOR 
PURE 

MILK, BUTTER, CREAM 

AND STRICTLY FRESH 

EGGS 

Try the 

Elmwood Creamery 

Ashby Avenue and College 
Phone Berkeley 3238 



Good Groceries for Good 
Cooks 

Lenfestey 

Cash Grocery Co. 

2441 Shattuck Ave., Cor. Haste St. 

Phones Berkeley 46776878 

Home Baking a Specialty 



F. C. Gleed, Manager. 



Telephone Berkeley 6776 



lmwoo6 (Grocer? 

"Quality <Boo6s" 



2644 ASHBY AVENUE, 



BERKELEY, CAL. 



Personal Checking Accounts 

A checking account in this bank will 
make you more systematic in your busi- 
ness transactions and will help you to con- 
duct your affairs with greater economy. 
Personal and household accounts invited. 

FIRST [NATIONAL BANK OF BERKELEY 



L. F. Shean 



J. L. Taylor 



Varsit? <Tan6? Sfyop 

Fine Candies Frozen Delicacies 
Corner Telegraph Avenue and Bancroft Way 



Frozen Desserts Furnished fof 
All Occasions. 



Telephone Berkeley 907. 
Berkeley, California. 



Telephone Berkeley 2976 

MISS NETTA CRANE 
DRESSMAKING 

708 Studio Building 

University Ave., at Shattuck 

Berkeley, Gal. 



Phones: Berkeley 10671068 

Eaton Bros., Prop. 

The Brighton Market 

CHOICE MEATS, POULTRY 
AND FISH 

Dwight Way at Telegraph Ave. 

2503 Dwight Way 
Berkeley, California 



H. Detlefsen 

The Enterprise 

FURNISHING GOODS 
HOSIERY, UNDERWEAR 
FANCY GOODS, NOTIONS 
NECKWEAR, ART GOODS 

2509 Telegraph Avenue, Near 
Dwight Way 
Berkeley, Cal. 

Phone Berkeley 5545 

F. F. Jacobs 

TINNING & PLUMBING 

General Jobbing 

Plumbing Contracts a Specialty 
I Guarantee All My Work 

2104 Ashby Avenue 
Berkeley, Cal. 



J. R. Fort 



A. A. Smith 



Berkeley Electrical Co. 

CONTRACTING & REPAIRING 

Artistic Lighting Fixtures 

SUPPLIES 



Phone Berkeley 8747 



2158 Center St., Near Oxford 
Berkeley, Cal. 



THOMAS DAY COMPANY 

Lighting Fixtures 



725 Mission Street 
San Francisco 



Berkeley 1148 

A. A. Handle Co. 

JEWELERS 
OPTOMETRISTS 

2119 Center St., Berkeley, Cal. 

Telephones Berkeley 778779 
Agency Timm Certified Milk 

Davidson's Creamery 

J. H. Davidson 
Milk, Cream, Butter, Eggs, etc 

High Class Goods 

Prompt and Careful Service 

2079 University Avenue 

Berkeley, Cal. 



Bus. Phone 7881 Res. Phone 3055 
"QUALITY" 

THE HOLE IN THE WALL 

W. F. Norton, Florist 

Cut Flowers, Potted Plants, Seeds 
Bulbs, Shrubs, Trees 

Funeral Work, etc. 

2227 Shattuck Ave. 

Berkeley, California. 

Res. Phone, Berkeley 6083 
Office Phone, Berkeley 7799 

Hull Plumbing Co. 

L. B. Hull, Jr., Mgr. 

Estimates Given on Plumbing 

Job Work a Specialty 

STOVES AND RANGES 

KITCHEN WARE, COAL OIL 

Residence, 2627 Fulton St. 

Office, 2389 Shattuck Avenue 

Berkeley, Cal. 



Phone Oakland 2524 



Goldberg, Bowen & Co, 
Grocers 

477-79-81 Thirteenth Street 
Oakland 



BRAKE'S, the Ladies Shop 

Do not fail to see our NEW DEPARTMENTS 

Household Linens, Domestics, Flannels, Bedding, 
Draperies, etc. 

ROYAL SOCIETY ART GOODS 
POPULAR PRICES 

Telegraph Avenue at Durant 

Phone Berkeley 878 

L. H. SERVICE 

Diamonds, Watches, Clocks Jewelry, China 

Sterling and Silver Plated Ware 
Cut Glass, etc. 

Optician Engraving. 
2134 Center Street Berkeley, Calif. 

Cleaning and Pressing Phone Berkeley 3452 

F. PONSI & CO. 

HIGH-GRADE LADIES' TAILORS 

Imported Wools and Novelties 

2519 DURANT AT TELEGRAPH 
Chas. Reuter, Manager 

Humboldt Fruit Co. 

Dealers in Fresh 
FRUITS AND VEGETABLES 

2130 Center Street Phone Berk. 7787 and 7788 



T! 




PUBLISHED BY 

THE TWENTIETH CENTURY CLUB 

OF BERKELEY 



PRESS OF 

A. NEXVMAN 

1914 



Good-morrow, dear lady, 
Wherever you are, 
I come to greet you 
From near and from far. 

If you carefully study 
The rules in this book, 
You will surely make 
A most famous cook. 

To you each has given 
The best in her store, 
Cakes, puddings, and pies 
You will find them galore. 

And when preparing 
Your food for the day, 
Do not neglect this 
Caution I pray: 

Add a cupful of love, 
And a spoonful of spice, 
And lo! you have 
A spread for a king in a trice. 

R. 



Is Your Family Well Nourished ? 

DO YOU KNOW FOOD VALUES? 

A reasonable intelligence combined with a disposition to 
exercise the same degree of judgment and care in the nutrition 
of the body as is expended on other matters of no greater im- 
portance pertaining to the individual, to the household or to 
business interests, are all that is needed to bring about harmony 
between every-day dietary habits and the nutritive require- 
ments of the body. There is no occasion, unless one finds 
pleasure and satisfaction in so doing, to resort to a limited die- 
tary of nuts and fruits, to become an ardent disciple of vege- 
rarianis.'n, to adopt a cereal diet, to abjure meats entirely or to 
follow in an intensive fashion any particular dietary hobby. 

FOOD CONTAINS THESE ELEMENTS: 

1. Protein makes blood and muscle, and renews the body 
framework. 

2. Fats store heat and energy. 

3. Carbohydrates create heat and energy. 

4. Mineral matter forms bone, assists digestion, cleanses 
the blood. 

(All foods contain water, some as much as 50 per cent. it 
aids excretion, distributes heat over the body and dissolves 
food.) 

THE BODY REQUIRES DAILY: 

1. Protein 160 to 300 units. 

2. Fals 500 to 900 units three times as much as protein. 

3. Carbohydrates 1000 to 1800 units twice as much as 
fats. 

4. Mineral matter and vegetable fiber for "bulk" and as 
blood cleansers. 

A well-balanced diet combines these elements in proper 
proportion. 

Meals should not have too much of any one element. 

WHAT THE ELEMENTS ARE: 

1. Protein lean meat, white of eggs, cheese, fish, gluten 
of grains, beans, lentils, nuts. 

2. Fats butter, vegetables and animal oils, nut fats. 

3. Carbohydrates sugars and starches in potatoes, rice, 
milk and other vegetables and fruits. 

4. Mineral matter salts and acids in fruits, vegetables and 
other foods. 



PREFACE. 



This book is compiled with no attempt at literary effort, 
and no form for writing the recipes has been observed. 

The compiler preferred to publish each recipe as it was 
sent. 

Not every member of The Twentieth Century Club of 
Berkeley has furnished a recipe, and not every one that has 
been received has been used, as there were duplicates, and our 
space is limited. 

We urge subscribers to try the recipes in this book, some 
may be new, many are old favorites; all have been tried. 

Most families enjoy new dishes, and even though the head 
of the house may make fun of a new dish, or of one that is not 
common on your table, he usually eats it (if it is good). 

Too many homemakers get in a rut in cookery; if we em- 
ploy servants it is easier; if we do our own cooking it becomes 
a habit. 

The following, copied from a popular magazine, may in- 
fluence you to try many of the recipes in this book: 

"How many of us cut out, from papers and magazines, re- 
cipe after recipe, and file them away faithfully! 'Some day 
I will try them,' are the words that go with them; but the 
thought must go, too, for the day never comes; the paper clip- 
pings turn yellow, and we have missed, perhaps, more than we 
know; to get out the same pan, to take down the same bottle 
of extract, to use the same number of eggs is always easier. 
If we are in the habit of making chocolate frosting, chocolate 
it remains. In spite of the fact that there are over twenty-five 
good recipes for muffins, morning after morning we use but 
the one. While it is change, remember, that the body wants, it 
cannot always be, it need not always be, in the food itself. 
Appearance, form, flavor here variety is always possible, and 
only a little thought, the cost." 

Our advertisers have made the publication of this book 
possible. We urge the members of The Twentieth Century Club 
of Berkeley, and their friends to give them their patronage and 
thereby show their appreciation of the financial help of the 
advertiser. 



H. C. CAJPWELL CO. 

Clay, Fourteenth and Fifteenth Sts., Oakland 

The Right Kind of 
Aprons and House Dresses 

The woman who does her own cooking will do it 
easier and take greater pleasure in her work if she is 
properly dressed. 

A simple but attractive House Dress or a big cover- 
all apron to protect the better dress gives greater free- 
dom of movement. 

Our Aprons and House Dresses combine an at- 
tractive appearance with the utmost of good service. 

House Dress $1.25 to $6.50 
Aprons 25c to $1.75 



Largest Arts and Crafts Shop in 
Oakland. 

ROOKWOOD POTTERY. 
CALIFORNIA FAIENCE 

(Made in Berkeley) 

564 Fifteenth St., Oakland. 
Opposite Taft & Pennoyer. 



Exclusive 
Millinery 

Sara and Grace Wright 
359 Twelfth St. Oakland 



The Tea Kettle 

DAINTY LUNCHES AND 
AFTERNOON TEA 

2315 Telegraph Ave. 
BERKELEY. 

Mabel P. O'Rourke 



Phone Berkeley 6759 

Collins 5 Grocery 

GROCERIES OF QUALITY 

BUTTER, EGGS, FRUITS 
VEGETABLES 

Phone Orders Delivered 
Promptly 

2903 Telegraph Ave., Cor. Russell 
Berkeley, Cal. 



Soups. 



In making soups purchase the shin of beef, and use cold 
water to draw out the flavoring and juices. The object is di- 
rectly opposite from boiling. By using cold water and cooking 
the meat at a low temperature, we get the flavoring and stimu- 
lating parts of the meat, but we cannot make a meat soup nu- 
tritious unless we add other materials. Clear and hot, it is 
stimulating, but has no food-value. 

A good rule to remember is to serve a clear soup at the 
beginning of a heavy dinner, and to precede the "scrap" or 
"pick up dinner" with a good cream soup. 

MARROW BALLS. 

One egg, beaten; season with salt and pepper; stir in enough 
cracker crumbs to make stiff batter; work in about three tea- 
spoons of marrow fat; make into balls. Boil in soup fifteen 
minutes. Mrs. F. C. 

GERMAN NOODLES. 

Beat up 1 egg; add pinch of salt, flour enough to make stiff 
dough; roll out in very thin sheet; dredge with flour to keep 
from sticking. In about 1 hour roll up tightly, and for soup 
noodles shave fine like vermicelli. 

For noodles to be served as a separate dish, cut in about Vz 
inch wide strips, stir in boiling salt water to cover, boil about 
ten minutes; drain, serve on hot platter, cover with butter 
browned and some bread crumbs browned in butter. 

TOMATO BISQUE. 

Put into the soup-kettle % cup flour and % cup butter, a 
teaspoon salt, a little pepper and a pinch of sugar. Rub these 
to a cream and add 1 quart of tomatoes pressed through a 
colander. Stir this over the fire until it boils and let it boil up 
well for a minute. Then add 1 quart of cold milk and stir con- 
stantly until it boils again, when it is ready to serve. Mrs. C. 
M. M. 

LIMA BEAN PUREE. 

Soak 1 cup dried lima beans over night. In morning pick 
beans out of water, cover with fresh water, cook slowly till 



14 SOUPS 

tender, keeping covered with water till tender; then let water 
cook away. Add salt; mash beans slightly in pot, add 1 table- 
spoon butter, little pepper and milk to make thickness desired. 

VEGETABLE SOUP WITHOUT MEAT. 

Scrape and slice three turnips and three carrots, peel three 
onions and fry all with a little butter until a light yellow; add 
a bunch of celery and three leeks cut in pieces; stir and fry all 
the ingredients for six minutes; when fried add one clove of 
garlic, two stalks of parsley, salt and pepper and a little grated 
nutmeg; cover with three quarts of water and simmer for three 
hours; strain and add vermicelli, Italian paste or rice. 

PEAPOD SOUP. 

Wash the peapods thoroughly, then take the strings from 
the sides, just as you would beans. Cover with cold water and 
a little salt. Boil for about half an hour for 1 pound of pods. 
Then strain and add 1 cup of milk and a little thickening of 
flour and cold water and boil for five minutes or until thick. 



GREEN PEA SOUP. 

Cook 1 quart green peas (fresh) in 1 quart water till ten- 
der or use left over peas and water in which they are cooked. 
Make white sauce of 2 tablespoons butter, 2 tablespoons flour, 
1 teaspoon salt, Vi teaspoon pepper, 1 quart milk. Rub peas 
through coarse strainer or mash them and add to white sauce. 

CREAM OF CELERY. 

Three cups tough ends of celery cut in small pieces and 3 
cups water or enough water to cover celery; cook till tender. 
Make white sauce of 3 tablespoons butter, 3 tablespoons flour, 1 
teaspoon salt, % teaspoon white pepper, 3 cups milk. Add 
cooked celery and liquid (unstrained) to white sauce and serve. 

CREAM OF ONION SOUP. 

Put 1 quart of stock and 4 sliced onions in a sauce pan and 
bring slowly to boiling point. Simmer gently three-quarters of 
an hour. Then press through fine sieve, return to fire, rub to- 
gether 1 tablespoon butter and 2 tablespoons flour. Add gradu- 
ally a little of the hot soup. When smooth turn it into the 
kettle and stir until it reaches the boiling point, then add 1 gill 
of cream or milk, a seasoning of salt and pepper, turn into a 
tureen, add a tablespoon chopped parsley and serve. Mrs. E. 
.1. McK. 



SOUPS 15 

CREAM OF SPINACH SOUP. 

This is the most palatable and sightly of the green soups. 
Wash 1 quart of spinach, throw it into a dry kettle, add % cup 
water, and shake and toss over the fire for five -minutes; cover 
the kettle, and cook five minutes longer; drain, saving the water. 
Chop the spinach very fine, press it through a sieve, return it 
to the kettle with the water, add 1 tablespoon of grated onion, 
1 quart of milk, 2 tablespoons flour rubbed with 2 tablespoons 
butter, V<t teaspoon celery-salt and a dash of pepper; stir con- 
stantly until the soup reaches the boiling point, strain again 
through a sieve, turn at once into the soup-tureen, and serve 
with puff balls. 

PUFF BALLS. 

Put 1 tablespoon butter and 4 tablespoons of water into 
a saucepan; when boiling stir in hastily 4 tablespoons dry 
flour. When you have a smooth dough stand it aside a moment 
to cool, then beat into it the white of 1 egg. Drop this batter 
from the tip of a teaspoon onto a greased paper in the bottom 
of a baking pan; the dough should not be larger than a good- 
sized pea. Bake in a quick oven until light and crisp, and they 
are ready for use. 

CREAM OF CELERY SOUP. 

To 1 cup of well cooked celery rubbed through colander, 
add 1 quart milk and when near boiling stir in 1 scant table- 
spoon flour into which 2 tablespoons of butter has been rubbed, 
and M teaspoon salt. Cook well in double cooker. Just before 
serving allow % raw onion to remain in hot soup for 10 
minutes. Remove onion and stir in 1 cup whipped cream and 
serve at once. E. H. 

CREAM CRAB SOUP. 

Two quarts milk, 1 large crab picked fine, small onion and 
little parsley chopped; dash of cayenne pepper. Put all of 
these in the milk and let come to boiling point. Two table- 
spoons flour and good-sized piece of butter mixed with flour; 
soften with some of the milk and let all cook half an hour. 
Just before serving add 2 well beaten eggs. M. D. B. 

OXTAIL SOUP. 

Slice a small onion and fry brown in a tablespoon butter 
or drippings. Put in the joints of oxtail and let them brown 
on all sides; then turn the contents of the frying-pan into the 
soup-kettle, add a sliced carrot, some celery, parsley, 2 pepper- 



16 SOUPS 

corns, or a little cayenne, and salt; cover with cold water and 
simmer slowly until the meat begins to fall from the bones. 
A cup of strained tomato may be added if liked. Mrs. C. M. M. 

CLAM BOUILLON. 

One small can minced clams, 1 pint milk, 1 onion, 3 table- 
spoons butter, 1 tablespoon flour, salt and pepper to taste. Cul 
onion fine, and fry a light brown in the butter, then add 1 
tablespoon flour. Add gradually, stirring constantly the 
warmed milk. When smooth and creamy add the clams and 
seasoning and let cook a few minutes. Place in double boiler 
until ready to serve. H. "VY. M. 

MOCK OYSTER SOUP. 

Scrape 12 good-sized roots of oyster-plant or salsify, and 
throw them at once into cold water to prevent discoloration. 
(hit them into thin slices, cover with a pint of boiling water, 
add 1 ounce of salt codfish or mackerel, cover, and cook 1 hour. 
Remove the fish, add a quart of good milk, a level teaspoon salt, 
a dash of black pepper, and 2 tablespoons butter. Turn into 
the tureen, and serve with oyster crackers. 



SOUPS 17 

ADDITIONAL RECIPES 



Fish. 



TURBOT A LA CREME FOR TEN PEOPLE. 

One pint milk, 4 tablespoons flour, 4 or 5 Ibs. fish (cod or 
halibut), 2 onions, salt and pepper, 1 pint cream, 1 cup bread 
crumbs, 1 bunch parsley, a little nutmeg. Boil or bake the fish, 
take out bones, shred; 2 small onions and parsley in milk and 
cream, let it come to a boil. Take out onions, stir in flour, add 
nutmeg, salt and pepper. Butter a baking dish, put in layer of 
sauce, then fish. Finish with sauce and sprinkle over it bread 
crumbs. Bake half an hour. R. D. 

GOOD FISH RECIPE. 

Get 2 salmon or halibut steaks % inch thick. Slice and fry 
onion until clear; spread onion and chopped pimiento on one 
steak; lay other steak on it for about 2 hours. Take off upper 
steak, salt and pepper steak; lay oysters thickly over it; put 
salt and pepper and bits of butter on oysters; lay upper steak 
on. Bake this fish "sandwich" with four strips of salt pork 
under it and four on top of it. When fish is almost done, 
spread on it bread crumbs soaked in butter and brown quickly. 
Serve with cream sauce and chopped egg on platter garnished 
with lemon and radishes. P. E. A. 

KEDGEREE. 

Two cups of cooked fish, one teaspoon salt, Vz cup butter, 
V-i teaspoon pepper, 1 cup cooked rice, 1 speck of mace, 2 hard 
boiled eggs chopped fine. First melt butter and add flaked fish 
to it, then add the other ingredients and stir over the stove un- 
til hot. If too dry add a little milk or water and serve, but do 
not bake. 

SALMON LOAF. 

One can salmon (or 1 pint boiled salmon), break with fork, 
add 1 cup cracker crumbs, 2 tablespoons melted butter, 2 beaten 
eggs, salt, and red pepper. Boil in buttered mold 1 hour. Turn 
out and slice when cold. Garnish with hard boiled egg and 
serve with lemon. C. C. 

BROILED FISH In Gas Stove. 

Split the fish down the back, wash and dry it. Brush the 
flesh side with olive oil, and dust with salt and pepper. Put it 



FISH 19 

on the rack of your baking pan, flesh side up, and put it near 
the flame. Do not burn it. It will broil in about twenty min- 
utes. Do not turn it. 

FISH CHOWDER. 

Cut up and remove the bones from 1% pounds of hali- 
but or cod. Lay the fish in the bottom of the soup-kettle and 
cover with 4 large potatoes cut into dice. Fry out 2 slices of 
salt pork cut fine, with a large sliced onion, pour over the fish 
and potatoes, cover with water and cook slowly for an hour. 
Add 1 pint of milk just before serving. Mrs. C. M. M. 

CLAM CHOWDER. 

Cut off the tough part of 1 quart of clams and chop fine, 
leaving the soft part whole. Cut 2 slices of salt pork in small 
pieces and fry with a good sized onion, sliced. Cut 3 good- 
sized potatoes into dice and put them into 1 quart of boiling 
water. Add all the clams and the juice, the pork and onion; 
cover and cook slowly for an hour and a half. Just before 
serving add 1 cup milk in which a tablespoon of flour has been 
stirred. If too thick add more milk or water. Mrs. C. M. M. 



CLAM LOAF. 

One can minced clams, 1 egg, 1 cup milk, 1 cup rolled 
cracker crumbs, 1 teaspoon baking powder, 1 tablespoon butter, 
salt and pepper. Bake 20 minutes. Serve immediately. B. R. 
P. 

BISQUE OF CRAB. 

Meat of 1 crab, 1 tablespoon flour, V cup butter, salt and 
pepper to taste; a few drops onion juice; a speck of grated nut- 
meg. Chop crab fine, season, add melted butter and one cup of 
stale bread crumbs. Pour over this 1 quart of hot milk, put in 
soup kettle, cook ten minutes, strain and heat again. Add more 
seasoning if needed. E. W. C. 

CRAB FRAKE. 

One-half pint cream (1 cup), % tablespoon mustard, piece 
of butter size of an egg, 1 salt spoon of pepper, 1 salt spoon of 
salt. Mix all well, let come to a boil and stir in crab and 1 
beaten egg. Put in a baking dish; sprinkle with cracker 
crumbs and place bits of butter on top and brown in oven. 
Mrs. F. F. C. 



20 FISH 

SCALLOPED OYSTERS. 

Put a layer of rolled crackers in bottom of pudding dish, 
a layer of oysters drained. Sprinkle each layer with pepper, 
salt and pinches of butter until the dish is full, then pour over 
a cup of milk or more according to size of dish. Bake three- 
quarters of an hour. Mrs. S. P. 

BOSTON CODFISH BALLS. 

Soak a piece of salt codfish in cold water for several hours. 
Pour off the water, add fresh, and boil until tender. Remove 
the skin and bones and shred the fish until it is a mass of 
fibre, then mix with an equal quantity of mashed potato, a 
beaten egg, a little melted butter and just enough milk to make 
it easy to handle. Shape into little balls and fry in deep, hot 
fat until golden brown. Serve for breakfast with orange mar- 
malade and hot, buttered toast. Mrs. C. M. M. 

CODFISH BALLS. 

One cup sliced raw potatoes, Vz cup codfish flakes. Cook 
potatoes and codfish together until potatoes are soft. Pour off 
excess of water. Add 1 beaten egg, season with salt and pap- 
rika, and beat all together until very light. Make into small 
balls. Fry in deep fat. For frying in morning prepare balls 
the night before. K. D. G. 

SAUCE FOR FISH. 

One tablespoon melted butter, 1 of finely cut parsley, 
1 teaspoon lemon juice, salt. Put on fish, set in oven a minute 
of two. L. K. 



FISH 21 

ADDITIONAL RECIPES 



Fowl. 



ROAST WILD DUCK. 

Wash carefully and fill with sliced carrots and celery. 
While damp rub with salt. Arrange in roasting pan with small 
slices of bacon on top and dash of cayenne pepper. Roast in 
the closed pans in hot oven for 30 minutes and serve with 
baked apples. E. W. 

WILD DUCK. 

If the weather is cold wild duck is better if kept several 
days. After dressing the duck in the usual way by plucking, 
singeing, drawing, and washing, place it in a dripping pan in a 
hot oven, letting it remain for 10 minutes without basting. Then 
baste frequently with butter and water. If preferred well done, 
let cook for 40 minutes. Place on a flat dish, season with salt 
and pepper, pour over it the gravy and serve with currant 
jelly. A whole onion peeled and cooked inside the duck gives 
it a delicious flavor. S. D. 

QUAIL. 

Quail should be drawn as soon as killed. Then they may 
be hung in a cool place and will keep for three or four days. 
When ready to use them, remove the feathers by skinning; 
thoroughly wash in cold water, and keep them whole by split- 
ting down the back. Salt and pepper them, roll them in flour 
and place in frying pan of hot lard or lard and butter. Brown 
them well on both sides and serve hot. S. D. 

CHICKEN, PANNED WHOLE. 

Singe a spring chicken; remove the head and feet, split 
do\vn the back, and remove the intestines. Wipe the chicken 
inside and out, cross the legs, fold back the wings, and break 
or flatten the breast-bone. Place the chicken in a pan, bone 
side down; dust lightly with pepper, baste all over with melted 
butter, add V-2 cup of stock, and put in a very hot oven. After 
about 15 minutes, baste again with melted butter, dust with 
salt, and cook 30 minutes longer; if the oven is hot, % of an 
hour will brown the chicken nicely. Dish, garnish with pars- 
ley, and serve with plain cream sauce made in the roasting-pan. 
B. A. 



FOWL 23 

YANKEE CHOP SUEY. 

One chicken, 3 slices of bacon, 3 pork chops, 1 pint of string 
beans (or 1 can), 1 pint of corn from the cob (or 1 can), % cup 
of dried mushrooms (or 1 can). Boil chicken, pork and bacon 
till tender, remove the bones and cut in small pieces. Add the 
vegetables and boil slowly 1 hour. Season with 2 tablespoons 
Worcestershire sauce, salt, pepper and paprika to taste. Add 
a little flour if too thin. Chop suey should be about the con- 
sistency of chowder and served with boiled rice. Mrs. E. B. G. 

CURRIED CHICKEN OR VEAL. 

Cook and season the same as chicken fricasse. Fry a pint 
or more of sliced onions light brown. Just before removing 
from the fire thicken the gravy with flour and 1 tablespoon of 
curry moistened with water. Then stir the meat and onions 
together and it is ready for the table. It should be eaten with 
boiled rice. Mrs. H. N. B. 

CHICKEN EN CASSEROLE. 

Boil chicken until tender and cut off of bones. 1 slice 
ham cut in squares, 2 or 3 tomatoes according to size, a little 
minced onion and green pepper; use broth simmered into a 
sauce. Fry chicken brown in oil. Mix all with boiled rice and 
green peas. Bake % hour. 

SKOOKUM CHICKEN. 

One fat hen, cut in small pieces and boil until tender; pick 
meat off of bones. Butter a baking dish; put in layer of 
chicken, then layer of French mushrooms, then layer of bread 
crumbs with plenty of butter; salt and pepper. Do this until 
baking dish is filled. Over this pour chicken liquor and juice 
of mushrooms until it shows above chicken. Bake % hour. 
To one large chicken take one large can of mushrooms. S. E. 
D. 

PHILADELPHIA DRESSING FOR ROAST FOWL. 

Grate as much stale bread as required and put into a frying- 
pan with a large lump of butter; about a tablespoon to a quart 
of crumbs. Add salt, pepper and sage if liked, and stir over 
the fire until the butter is thoroughly melted into the bread. 
Remove from the fire and stir in a well beaten egg. If too dry 
add a little hot water but do not make it soft. Boiled and 
chopped chestnuts, sausage or oysters may be added. 

CHICKEN PUDDING. 

Cut up chicken as for fricassee and stew in just enough 
water to keep from burning; season each piece with salt and 



24 FOWL 

pepper and lay in a large pudding or baking dish; beat 2 eggs 
until light, add to 1 pint of milk; 1 quart of canned or grated 
corn; season with pepper and salt, pour over chicken; cover 
with a layer of fine bread crumbs; dot with butter and bake in 
quick oven. A. L. B. 

PRESSED CHICKEN. 

Boil 2 fat chickens until very tender, remove all the bones, 
and place some of the liquor in a mold, filling it with the well 
seasoned chicken. Put in a cold place until firm; turn out; 
cut in slices. D. 

SPANISH CHICKEN. 

Cut up chicken as for fricassee; boil till nearly done, then 
add 1 cup of well washed rice, % can tomatoes and Spanish 
pepper to taste. A. L. B. 



FOWL 25 

ADDITIONAL RECIPES 



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Meats and Accompaniments. 

With roast beef tomato sauce, grated horseradish, cran- 
berry sauce, pickles. 

With roast pork apple sauce, curried apples. 

With roast veal tomato sauce, mushroom sauce, onion 
sauce, cranberry sauce, horseradish, lemons. 

With boiled mutton currant jelly, caper sauce. 

With roast lamb mint sauce. 

With roast turkey cranberry sauce, currant sauce. 

With venison or wild duck cranberry sauce, currant jelly. 

\Vith roast goose apple sauce, cranberry sauce, grape or 
currant jelly. 

With boiled fish white cream sauce, lemon sauce. 

TO ROAST MEAT WELL. 

Meat must be wiped off with wet cloth, then salted, pep- 
pered and dredged with flour; put into a hot oven, to sear the 
outside and protect the juices. After about 10 minutes baste 
frequently; when necessary to turn, do not put a fork in meat 
as that allows the juices to escape; a little hot water may be 
put in pan to baste with after meat has been in oven 10 or 15 
minutes. 

DRESSING FOR MEAT. 

Use stale bread crumbs moistened with melted butter, high- 
ly seasoned with salt, pepper and sweet herbs. If you like, a 
little sausage meat may be used with less butter. E. W. C. 

ROAST BEEF WITH BATTER PUDDING. 

Choose the best cut of the rump, preferably five pounds or 
more in weight. Have the butcher send a slice of suet % inch 
thick as the rump cut is deficient in fat. Put meat in pan, lay 
the slice of suet on top, and dredge with flour. Never use salt 
as it toughens the meat and dries up the juices. Roast in a hot 
oven 10 minutes for every pound, if liked rare. After the first 
half hour lower the oven heat. When the roast is done remove 
from pan and keep in the warming oven on a hot platter, while 
baking the pudding in the dripping pan. 

Batter Pudding. 

Two eggs, % cup milk, V-2 cup flour, ^ level teaspoon salt, 
V-2 level teaspoon baking powder. Beat eggs, add milk, and 



28 MEATS 

flour sifted with dry ingredients. Beat thoroughly. Pour into 
the pan while hissing hot, and bake 20 minutes in the beef 
drippings. 

EMPERORS ROAST. 

Two pounds beef, 2 pounds veal, 1 pound of pork, all three 
chopped fine while raw; 1 cup grated bread crumbs, 1 grated 
onion, salt, pepper, nutmeg to season; 2 eggs and small piece 
of butter. Make in loaf, with the bits of butter put on top. 
Put in buttered pan and when brown baste with milk. This 
makes the gravy; bake about 1% hours. Serve hot or cold. H. 
W. W. 

CROSS-RIB POT ROAST. 

Rub the meat with onion; place in hot kettle and sear on 
all sides, turning in kettle for 15 minutes. Then add 1 cup of 
hot water; add 1 large carrot chopped, and two cloves. Salt 
should not be added until roast is nearly done. Cook on a very 
slow fire, adding a very little water occasionally. A 4 or 5 
pound roast should take 4 hours. K. D. G. 

HARD TIMES STEAK VERY GOOD EXCELLENT. 

Take a two or three pound piece of round steak cut two 
inches thick; pound into the two sides of it a scant cup of 
flour. Have iron kettle hot; fry to a nice brown on both sides 
as for a pot roast; salt and pepper to taste; add a pint of boil- 
ing water and simmer for two hours. When done the meat will 
be very tender and the gravy nicely thickened. P. E. A. 

SWISS STEAK. 

Take a piece of round steak two inches or more in thick- 
ness, and pound into it as much flour as it will take, using the 
edge of a heavy plate. Put the meat in a skillet with a little 
lard or drippings and fry brown on both sides. Then cover 
with water, adding some finely chopped onion, carrot and cel- 
ery,cover closely and cook two hours. Before it is quite done, 
season with salt and pepper. Mrs. C. M. M. 

HAMBURG STEAK A L'lTALIENNE. 

Simmer % pound Hamburg steak with V-z can of tomatoes 
for 1 hour. Prepare some spaghetti or macaroni by boiling un- 
til tender in salted water. Add to the meat after it has cooked 
for an hour, % cup grated cheese, a small lump of butter, salt 
and pepper to suit, and let it simmer 20 minutes longer. Thicken 
with a little flour and water if necessary. Put the macaroni 
around the edge of a hot platter and serve the meat mixture in 
the center. Mrs. C. M. M. 



MEATS 29 

KAVILLOLANI (AN HAWAIIAN DISH) 

One and one-half quarts waste beef, 1 quart cooked toma- 
toes, Vz pint boiled rice, 1 medium onion, 2 chili peppers. Chop 
onion and peppers together quite fine; season with salt to 
taste; put a layer in baking dish, then a layer of tomatoes, then 
put over the top all of the rice and pour what is left from the 
waste. Tobasco sauce will improve it when one likes it very 
hot. Bake 1 hour. W. C. C. 

BLANQUETTE OF BEEF. 

Ten cents worth of round steak cut into small squares, 
brown in butter. Add 1 cup of claret and simmer for 10 
minutes. Put 1 can or 6 large tomatoes in a saucepan, add 1 
onion, a bit of parsley, a bit of celery, a few dried mushrooms, 
% teaspoon alspice, salt, and a dust of paprika. Cook up and 
add to the meat; cook slowly at least 2 hours. At last add 
cooked vermicelli. Just before serving scatter grated cheese 
over top. A. 

CANNELON OF BEEF. 

Mix together 1% pounds of ground beef with % cup of 
breadcrumbs soaked soft in a little milk and one beaten egg. 
Season with salt and pepper, shape into a loaf and bake in a 
hot oven. Baste with a little hot water and butter. Mrs. C. M. 
M. 

GALANTINE OF BEEF. 

One pound Hamburg steak or round steak ground, % pound 
lean raw ham, chopped fine; % pound bread crumbs, 3 eggs, 
well beaten, and cold water equal to 1 egg; 1 teaspoon salt, Vz 
teaspoon white pepper. Mix all thoroughly, divide into two 
portions, shape sausage fashion, roll in a floured cloth and tie 
at each end and pin it in the middle. Place in boiling water 
and cook steadily for 2 hours. Take out of cloth when almost 
cold. Cut in slices and serve cold. Mrs. F. F. C. 

BEEFSTEAK PUDDING. 

Line pudding bowl with a finely chopped suet crust. Then 
fill with steak cut in small pieces, 2 sheep's kidneys and mush- 
rooms; season with pepper and salt and a little Worcestershire 
sauce and water to make gravy. Cover with paste. Well 
floured cloth and boil 5 hours. E. M. F. F. 

FLANK STEAK WITH ONIONS. 

Place in a casserole a flank steak \Vz inches thick, cover 
with onions finely sliced and well seasoned with salt and pep- 



30 MEATS 

per; cover onions with thin slices of salt pork and add 1 cup 
water; cover closely and bake in slow oven 3 to 4 hours. 

BEEF OR VEAL SPANISH. 

One knuckle of veal, 1 large onion, sliced; V4 teaspoon chili 
powder and salt to taste. Cover with water and boil until meat 
falls from bones. Remove meat and bones and add to the 
stock, 1 can tomatoes, 3 green peppers, % package spaghetti, 
and one pinch of cayenne. Cook slowly until spaghetti is well 
done and thickened, then turn in the chopped meat. Serve. 
(Do not cut meat too fine.) Mrs. I. P. 1). 

MEAT SOUFFLE. 

One cup cream sauce seasoned with chopped parsley and 
onion juice. Stir 1 cup of chopped meat chicken, fresh tongue, 
veal or lamb, into the sauce. When hot add the beaten yolks 
of 2 eggs; cook 1 minute and set away to cool. When cool, stir 
in the whites beaten stiff; bake in a buttered dish or ramekins 
about 20 minutes and serve immediately. Mrs. H. X. B. 

BREADED BREAST OF LAMB AND TOMATO SAUCE 

Cut 35 cents' worth of breast of lamb into squares of about 
three inches. Place in granite boiling pot and cover with boil- 
ing water; add a level teaspoon of salt, a little pepper, a small 
sliced onion, a sliced 'carrot, a little celery and parsley; boil 
gently three hours; remove bones from the meat and set to 
cool; strain broth and allow to stand long enough to harden 
and remove grease. When dinner is being prepared, place a 
can of tomatoes in saucepan and add to it a cup of broth (with 
fat removed), % small onion fried to a golden brown in butter, 
a little salt and pepper. Let cook, strain and thicken with 
flour and water blended for a gravy; dip in pieces of meat in 
egg and cracker crumbs and fry in the fat that \vas removed 
from broth; salt and pepper meat while it is frying; place meat 
on hot platter and pour over it the tomato sauce. 

LAMB CHOPS. 

Place lamb chops shoulder, loin, or French in pan; on 
eich chop lay slice of lemon with dash of paprika. Bake 20 
-Tinutes in hot oven. 

MUTTON STEAKS. 

One pound of cold mutton chopped fine, add to it 1 dozen 
raw oysters chopped fine, 1 teaspoon of the essence of anchovy, 
% teaspoon onion juice, % teaspoon salt, 2 tablespoons finely 
chopped beef's suet. V teaspoon ground mace and a dash of 



MEATS 31 

cayenne. Mix all together and form into small steaks. Fry 
quickly in butter and serve with tomato sauce poured around 
them. These are delicious. Mrs. E. J. McK. 

MUTTON STEW WITH BEANS OR POTATOES. 

Brown mutton thoroughly; add a little onion; sprinkle 2 
tablespoons flour or enough to thicken, brown; add pint of 
boiling water gradually; add kitchen bouquet (parsley, thyme 
and laurel) and cook 2 hours or more according to quantity of 
meat. If beans are to be used, add beans which have been 
partially cooked; otherwise add potatoes of uniform size about 
an hour before ready to serve stew. P. E. A. 

BLANQUETTE OF VEAL. 

Put in frying-pan tablespoon butter and 2 pounds veal cut 
in two or three inch squares (cutlet off the leg) and cook 
slowly for % hour, turning often. Put 1% tablespoons butter 
and 1 tablespoon flour in a stew pan. Make gravy with 3 cups 
of cold water, 1 onion, 1 carrot, 1 teaspoon salt, % teaspoon 
pepper. Add veal and simmer another half hour. Then stir in 
yolks of 3 eggs (well beaten), and 4 tablespoons cream. Cook 
1 minute more, remove from fire, and add 1 tablespoon lemon 
juice. S. E. D. 

BAKED HAM. 

Select the best grade unskinned ham and have it boned. 
Cover with cold water and soak over night. Scrub with brush 
and cover with cold water. Add small onion, several stocks of 
celery, parsley, red pepper and \vhole cloves. After it begins 
to boil let simmer 15 minutes for every pound. A twelve pound 
ham should boil slowly three hours. Let cool in same liquor. 
On the third day remove skin, cover with paste made of dry 
bread crumbs, brown sugar and water the ham was boiled in. 
Stick top full of whole cloves and bake slowly 1 hour. 
A. S. M. 

PORK BALLS. 

Grind fine % pound of lean pork and add a slice of bread 
soaked in milk, a beaten egg; season with salt, pepper and sage. 
Mix with a fork, shape into little balls and fry until brown. 
Mrs. C. M. M. 

HAM TOAST. 

Boil a quarter of a pound of lean ham; chop it fine with the 
yolks of 3 eggs well beaten, half an ounce of butter, 2 table- 
spoons of cream and a little cayenne pepper. Stir it over the 
fire until it thickens and spread it on hot toast, with the crust 
cut off; garnish with parsley. 



32 MEATS 

LIVER HASH. 

When you have liver and bacon left over, run them through 
a meat chopper (or chop fine by hand), and serve as follows: 
Make a white sauce with a spoon of butter, a spoon of flour 
well cooked together and a cup and a half of milk added slowly, 
stirring all the time. Season with salt, pepper, and, if you have 
them, a little thyme, sage and bay leaf. Add the chopped liver 
and bacon, and serve on slices of toast. You w r ill not believe 
until you have tried it, how good this dish is. It can be made 
from boiled liver, also, although the fried liver gives a little 
better flavor to the dish. A poached egg on top of each* slice of 
toast and hash makes a nice addition. If you have a little liver 
and little veal left over, cut the veal in small pieces, grind the 
liver rather fine, add to the sauce as above, and serve with 
mashed potato. 

BAKED SAUSAGE. 

Arrange the rounds of sausage in a shallow baking-dish, 
pour around them a little stewed and seasoned tomato, and 
bake until brown. A. L. B. 

BROILED HONEYCOMB TRIPE. 

Brush over both sides of the tripe with melted butter or 
bacon fat, then pat on a board on which sifted bread crumbs 
have been spread, first on one side then on the other; set into 
a hot well-oiled broiler and cook over a bed of coals or under 
a gas flame from 4 to 8 minutes. Under the gas flame turn but 
once. 

SCALLOPED SAUSAGE. 

Arrange % dozen slices of sausage in the bottom of a bak- 
ing-dish, pile on top mashed potato which has been well 
seasoned with salt, pepper and butter, and into which a cup of 
hot milk has been beaten; dot with bits of butter, and bake half 
an hour in a hot oven. 

BEEF TONGUE IN CASSEROLE. 

Wash a fresh tongue quickly, cover with boiling water and 
cook gently over simmering burner about an hour and a half. 
Remove all skin and unsightly portions and place in casserole 
with a cupful of sliced carrots, also minced onion, celery and 
parsley. Add stock enough to cover the vegetables, season well 
and place in a moderate oven. Bemove cover of casserole 
after an hour's cooking and allow half an hour longer to brown 
slightly. Make a brown, thickened sauce to serve with tongue, 
to which add two tablespoons each of vinegar and chopped 
pickle and kitchen bouquet to color and flavor. B. 



MEATS . 

TONGUE BOILED. 

Put on to boil with boiling water, salt, white pepper, all- 
spice, cloves, slice of lemon peel, onion, all kinds of vegetables, 
carrots, turnip and celery. Boil until tender enough to peel off 
skin; serve with sauce. 

Sauce. 

Brown about 4 tablespoons flour in butter; when browned 
add Vz cup finely chopped onions; add strained stock of 
tongue, then add 1 teaspoon sugar, some catsup, few drops of 
Worcestershire, a little lemon juice; boil a little while, then 
add tongue sliced. 



34 MEATS 

ADDITIONAL RECIPES 



Vegetables. 



One of our famous cooks has said that if the American 
housekeeper would give for one year as much time to the study 
of vegetables as she gives to cake and candy, the average of 
American cooking would reach a' much higher plane. 

Time for cooking green vegetables: 

Green peas fresh, 15 minutes; green peas, old, 30 minutes. 
Be sure the water boils before pouring over the peas. Cook 
without cover and they will remain green. 

String beans 45 minutes. 

Lima beans young, 30 minutes; older, 50 minutes. 

Cabbage whole head and hard, 2 hours; sliced, 30 minutes; 
chopped fine, 20 minutes. 

Cauliflower 30 minutes. 

Tomatoes baked whole in slow oven, 30 minutes. 

Onions young, 45 minutes. 

Celery stewed, 30 minutes. 

Spinach 20 minutes. 

Sprouts fresh, 30 minutes. 

ARTICHOKES. 

Clean artichokes and take out some of the center, then 
stand them in French dressing for % hour, then steam them for 
1 hour. Fill with cream chicken, mushrooms or sweet breads. 
Serve hot. R. D. 

BAKED CABBAGE WITH HAM. 

Freshly boiled cabbage with water pressed out, mixed with 
drawn butter, is placed in a baking pan. Sprinkle with grated 
cheese and ham, baked; serve with a slice of roast ham on top. 

BAKED CABBAGE WITH CHEESE. 

Take fresh boiled and pressed cabbage, season with salt, 
pepper and butter; arrange in layers in baking pan, each layer 
sprinkled with grated cheese, top layer with cheese and bread 
crumbs mixed; sprinkle with butter, bake and serve. 

BAKED CABBAGE. 

Take a firm white head of cabbage, cut in small pieces, 
and boil until tender. Drain off water, put in chopping bowl 



36 VEGETABLES 

and chop fine. To a large cup of rich milk add 1 egg beaten, 
2 tablespoons melted butter, seasoning with salt and white pep- 
per. Mix with cabbage, put in baking pan and bake 20 minutes, 
putting small pieces of butter over the top. Mrs. E. J. McK. 

STUFFED CABBAGE. 

A whole cabbage is parboiled, the heart removed, its place 
filled with a stuffing of finely chopped cooked meat and sau- 
sage meat mixed together; the stuffing is covered with a slice 
of salt pork, then the cabbage tied, placed in a saucepan with 
white stock and a little sherry wine, the cover put on and sim- 
mered till done; serve with a good brow r n gravy poured 
around. 

DELMONICO POTATOES. 

Two cups cold boiled potatoes, % cup grated cheese, % cup 
melted butter, % cup cracker crumbs, 1% cups white sauce, 
seasonings. Dice potatoes and place in layers in a baking dish. 
Cover each layer with grated cheese. Melt the butter, add the 
crumbs and when thoroughly mixed, add salt and red pepper. 
Make a milk sauce by melting 2 tablespoons butter in a sauce- 
pan, add a shaving of onion and 3 tablespoons flour. When 
mixed, add 1% cups milk, and salt and pepper to season. When 
thickened pour over the potatoes and cheese, dust with pap- 
rika or a very little red pepper, cover with the seasoned 
crumbs, and bake till brown in a hot oven. B. 

STUFFED POTATOES. 

Six hot baked potatoes, 2 tablespoons butter, 3 tablespoons 
hot milk or more, salt and pepper to taste, white of 1 egg beaten 
stiff. Cut potatoes lengthwise through center and scoop out 
inside without breaking skin; mash; season; beat well; cut and 
fold in white of egg; refill skin and brown in oven 5 minutes. 

POTATO FRITTERS. 

Three tablespoons cream potatoes, 3 eggs, milk sufficient to 
make batter, flour to stiffen, 1 teaspoon baking powder, 1 table- 
spoon sugar. Drop from spoon in hot lard. F. M. L. 

SWEET POTATOES A LA MODE. 

Put in a buttered baking dish, alternate layers of sliced 
sweet potatoes and apples, sprinkled with brown sugar. Put 
salt, pepper, and butter on the top, add a little water to keep 
from burning, and bake until tender. Mrs. C. M. M. 



VEGETABLES 37 

PAN-BAKED SWEET POTATOES. 

Cut cold boiled sweet potatoes into Vz inch slices, put them 
into a baking-pan with a thin layer of sugar between each 
layer of potatoes, and a dusting of salt and pepper. Add % 
cup water; cover the pan, and bake in a quick oven 20 minutes. 
Lift the lid, and bake % hour. These should be clear and 
rather transparent. Serve in the pan in which baked. 

SWEET POTATO CROQUETTES. 

Boil sweet potatoes, skin and mash. While hot season with 
salt, pepper, and butter. Form into balls the size of large wal- 
nuts. Dip and fry as other croquettes. A. S. M. 

STUFFED POTATO BALLS. 

Take a large tablespoon of white potatoes ready for cro- 
quettes, flatten out and place a large teaspoon of well seasoned 
chopped meat (any kind) inside and fold over them. Roll and 
dip and fry like croquettes. A. S. M. 

CREAMED TOMATOES. 

Season 6 raw peeled and sliced tomatoes; melt two heaping 
tablespoons butter; when melted put in the slices of tomatoes, 
cut thick; cook until tender, turning frequently. Stir in 1 cup 
of milk or cream, in which a tablespoon of flour has been 
mixed smooth. Cook until it thickens, stirring constantly. 
Serve at once with dainty rolls. 

MINCED MEAT IN TOMATOES. 

Select solid, large tomatoes, 1 for each person to be served. 
Cut off the stem end, remove the cores and seeds, stand them 
in a baking-pan, dust with salt and pepper, put a bit of butter 
the size of a pea in each tomato, and bake until they are tender, 
but not too soft. Mix any cold cooked meat, sufficient to fill the 
tomatoes, with salt, pepper, and a little crushed celery-seed; 
put in a saucepan with a little stock or water, and stir until 
hot. Take the tomatoes from the oven, fdl them with this mix- 
ture, put a tablespoon of tomato sauce on the top of each, and 
serve. Make the tomato sauce before you heat the meat. Z. 

TOMATOES ON THE HALF SHELL. . 

Cut tomatoes in halves. Sprinkle with salt and pepper and 
broil. Serve on squares of toast with pieces of crisp breakfast 
bacon. 

TOMATOES, CREOLE STYLE. 

Cut into halves crosswise 6 large tomatoes, place them in 



3,s VEGETABLES 

a buttered baking dish and sprinkle over them 2 green peppers 
finely chopped without seeds, 1 teaspoon onion chopped, 2 table- 
spoons butter in small bits and a liberal seasoning of salt and 
paprika. Bake until tender. Lift tomato halves carefully onto 
rounds of buttered toast, then add to the liquor left in baking 
pan 2 tablespoons butter and 2 tablespoons flour melted and 
browned well. Stir well and add 1 cup cream. Let boil up, 
strain over tomatoes and toast and serve. 

STUFFED TOMATOES. 

Cut off top or stem end of tomatoes. With handle of spoon 
scoop out seeds leaving partitions of tomato unbroken. Sprinkle 
inside of tomato with salt and turn up side to drain. Stuff with 
following mixture: 1 cup boiled rice and 1 cup minced lamb 
or mutton well seasoned. Bake 35 or 40 minutes. Serve plain 
or with cream sauce. Nice for a course at luncheon as it con- 
tains meat and two vegetables. A. S. M. 

CARROTS AU NATUREL. 

Having cooked the carrots in salt and water, remove all 
water and give them a few strokes with the knife without 
chopping them up. Put them into a frying pan in which you 
have heated some butter; salt to taste and serve very hot. This 
method of preparing carrots is very much appreciated in Italy, 
where they add filets of anchovies to it. 

STEWED CARROTS. 

Wash the carrots, scrape off the skin and cut into bits. Lay 
in cold w^ater for 1 hour, then place, still wet, in a double boiler 
and stew gently until thoroughly tender. Season with salt and 
pepper and turn into a deep dish. Cover with a w r hite sauce. 

STUFFED SUMMER SQUASH. 

Select summer squashes of the same size. Cut off the hard 
stems and parboil. Cut out a round disk around the stem and 
scoop out some of the contents. Grate a dozen ears of corn, 
add a tablespoon of melted butter, a tablespoon of thick cream, 
two eggs well beaten, and salt to taste. Fill each squash and 
bake until brown. 

STUFFED SUMMER SQUASH. 

Hollow out center of squash. Fill with dressing made of 
bread crumbs, celery, boiled ham, onion, summer squash cut 
from centers. Season with butter, celery, salt, cayanne, etc. A. 



VEGETABLES 39 

SQUASH PUFF. 

Press dry cooked squash through sieve. To % pint add 2 
tablespoons melted butter, % cup milk, salt, pepper, 2 eggs 
(yolks). Mix thoroughly. Fold in 2 beaten egg whites. Turn 
into buttered mold. Set in pan of hot water. Bake till center 
is firm. Serve turned from mold accompanied by a rich cream 
sauce: 1 tablespoon flour, 1 tablespoon butter, 1 cup cream or 
rick milk. Season with salt, pepper, celery salt, mace. A. 

ESCALOPED ONIONS. 

Boil onions as usual. When tender drain, and with a knife 
and fork chop them coarse. Add Vz cup, each, of bread crumbs 
and chopped English walnuts or pecans and a cup of rich milk. 
Season with salt and pepper. Sprinkle more buttered crumbs 
over the top and bake in a casserole 15 or 20 minutes or until 
the crumbs are browned. 

ONION SOUFFLE. 

One cup white sauce, % cup bread crumbs, J /4 teaspoon salt, 
% teaspoon pepper, 1 cup finely chopped cooked onions, 3 eggs, 
beat whites stiff. Mix other ingredients, add beaten whites, 
bake in buttered baking dish about 45 minutes in moderate oven. 
Serve immediately. 

PEAS IN CASES. 

Pair flat turnips, scoop out center and boil. Salt when 
about half done. Fill with hot peas seasoned with salt, pepper, 
and butter. A. S. M. 

LETTUCE AU JUS. 

Boil two or three heads of lettuce in slightly salted water 
for 10 minutes. Drain, cut open with a knife, and sprinkle with 
salt and pepper. Add two or three sliced carrots, a little onion, 
parsley and a good lump of butter, cover with water and cook 
slowly until the carrots are tender. Beat the yolk of an egg 
with 3 tablespoons of milk or cream and add just before serv- 
ing. Mrs. C. M. M. 

CORN FRITTERS. 

Cut and scrape the kernels from fresh corn or use 1 cup 
of canned corn. Add 2 beaten eggs, V-z teaspoon of salt, a little 
pepper, 1 cup of flour sifted with a small teaspoon of baking 
powder and enough sweet milk to make a drop batter. Fry 
by spoonfuls in hot fat. Mrs. C. M. M. 

CORN PUDDING. 

Grate corn from 5 ears, 3 eggs, white and yolks beaten sepa- 



40 VEGETABLES 

rately; 3 cups milk, salt and pepper to taste. Add the beaten 
whites the last minute. Bake in moderate oven until center is 
firm. A. 

CORN OYSTERS. 

One egg well beaten, 1 cup of canned corn, 1 tablespoon of 
melted butter, */4 cup of flour. Season highly with salt and 
pepper and drop by spoonfuls on pan of hot fat and brown on 
both sides. Mrs. F. F. C. 

SPANISH BEANS. 

One quart of Italian beans. Soak over night with 1 tea- 
spoon baking soda. Bring to boil in same water and then rinse 
thoroughly. Strain 1 can of tomatoes, a teaspoon ground mus- 
tard, 3 tablespoons brown sugar, minced onion (very fine) to 
taste, 1 large red sweet pepper or 1 can of pimentoes cut line, 
salt and red pepper, 6 tablespoons of olive oil. Add sufficient 
water to cover beans and cook in either a strausky or fireless 
cooker. A. S. M. 

SPANISH BEANS. 

Two cups small pink beans, ten cents salt pork. Soak 
beans over night, pour off water and barely cover with fresh 
water; add salt pork cut in small pieces, boil until the pork is 
tender. Chop one small onion, add one clove garlic, brown in 
1 tablespoon olive oil. Add 1 teaspoon of Gebhardt's chili pow- 
der, 1 tablespoon Worcestershire and add to the beans, then 
add 1 can tomatoes. 

N. B. Do not substitute any other chili powder and in add- 
ing water to beans the top of beans must be above water, or 
they will not absorb all of the tomatoes. Cook over very slow 
fire for four hours. Add salt if needed. Mrs. P. S. D. 

SCALLOPED RICE. 

Steam 1 cupful rice, allowing 1 tablespoon salt. Cover 
bottom of baking dish with rice sprinkled over with mild grated 
cheese and few grains of pepper. Repeat until rice is used. 
Fill dish half full of milk; cover with buttered cracker crumbs 
and bake until cheese is melted and crumbs are brown. 

ESCALLOPED RICE AND TOMATOES. 

A delicious, satisfying, "no-meat" dish is composed of rice, 
tomatoes, cheese and bread crumbs, with a little butter and 
plenty of seasoning. 

First, boil the rice until well done, then strain it through a 
colander. While the rice is cooking, bring to a boil about 2 
cups of tomatoes, either fresh or canned. Cover the bottom of 



VEGETABLES 41 

a buttered baking dish with a fairly generous layer of rice, 
sprinkle pepper and salt and dots of butter and then add a 
small part of the tomato. Continue this until the dish is full. 
The top layer should be of rice. Sprinkle this thickly with 
grated cheese, and last of all, a thin scattering of bread crumbs, 
with pepper, salt, bits of butter and a dash of paprika. Bake 
about ] 4 hour in a moderate oven. 

An excellent way of using up the left-overs of this dish is 
to fill green peppers with the mixture and bake. Z. A. 

SPANISH RICE. 

Fry a sliced onion in drippings and put with this 2 green 
peppers, seeded and diced. Cook 5 minutes and add a full cup 
of tomatoes (stewed), 1 tablespoon sugar. In bottom of baking 
dish put a layer of boiled rice, then one of tomato mixture, and 
so on until dish is filled. Moisten all with a cup of broth. If 
you haven't this use tomato juice. Sprinkle very few bread 
crumbs on top with little butter and bake. L. K. 

RICE SPANISH. 

One-half cup of drippings, Vz sliced onion. Fry onion and 
1 chopped dried pepper in drippings, then add 1 quart of to- 
matoes, % cup of rice, and % pint of cold water. Put in oven 
and bake until solid. Mrs. J. M. F. 

SPAGHETTI ITALIENNE. 

Take 1% pounds of lean beef cut in small pieces, brown in 
kettle with either butter or olive oil. When brown add 1% cups 
strained tomatoes, 1 onion cut small, clove of garlic, bay leaf, 
piece of cheese size of walnut, 1 can mushrooms, % teaspoon 
cayenne pepper, thyme and marjoram to suit taste; salt. Cook 
3 hours slowly. Cook 1 pound of spaghetti in slightly salted 
water till tender, place on platter, pour the above over it, cover 
with grated cheese. Set in oven till cheese melts and serve. 
M. D. B. 

EGG VERMICELLI. 

Two and a half tablespoons butter, 2V-2 tablespoons flour, 
I 1 :! cups milk, V4 teaspoon salt, speck pepper, 4 to 6 slices toast, 
3 hard boiled eggs. Make a white sauce of the first 5 ingredi- 
ents. Chop the whites of the eggs; add to white sauce and 
pour over toasted bread. Press yolks of eggs through a strain- 
er and sprinkle over top. H. S. 

ITALIENNE. 

One pound round steak, cut in halves; % cup butter. Brown 
meat thoroughly in butter; add 1 bay leaf, 1 large onion, 1 clove 



42 VEGETABLES 

garlic, \V-2 cups strained tomatoes, speck marjoram and thyme, 
saltspoon cayenne pepper, cheese size of walnut, 1 can mush- 
rooms. Cook slowly 3 or 4 hours. Cook spaghetti 1 hour; put 
on a platter; pour over it the meat and sprinkle over all % tea- 
cup grated cheese. Set in oven a few minutes. H. S. 

MACARONI FLORENTINE. 

Have the water boiling and add a teaspoon of salt. Do not 
break the macaroni but immerse the ends in boiling water and 
as it softens, coil it down into the kettle. Let it boil steadily 
for half an hour or more. When tender, drain off the water 
and add a cup of gravy or broth. Let the macaroni simmer 
slowly in this until it has absorbed all the liquid, then add ^4 
cup of grated cheese and a small lump of butter, shake the pan 
over the fire until all is melted and well mixed with the maca- 
roni, turn out on a hot dish and serve. Mrs. C. M. M. 

MACARONI OR SPAGHETTI FOR A FAMILY OF 6. 

Take % pound package, break it into short lengths. Pour 
over 1% pints boiling water, 1 level tablespoon salt, boil until 
tender. Take % head cauliflower, break it up, let it lie in cold 
water 1 hour. Chop fine 1 cup fresh carrots. Put 1 tablespoon 
butter in the dish, melt, then turn the macaroni, carrots and 
cauliflower into the dish, mix, season with salt and pepper. 
Add more butter, pour over 2 cups boiling water, cover, leave 
in moderate oven Vz hour. Remove cover, increase heat for 15 
minutes. Pour over 1 cup cream or milk, leave in oven 5 or 
10 minutes. R. D. 

TOMATO SAUCE FOR MEAT AND SPAGHETTI. 

One quart tomatoes, 2 onions, 2 cloves garlic, 2 green pep- 
pers, few seeds; 2 bay leaves. Boil about 1 hour, strain and 
pour over spaghetti which has been boiled in salted water. 
Cook odds and ends of meat in gravy until tender; mix all to- 
gether, adding a large tablespoon of olive oil and 1 teaspoon of 
Worcestershire sauce. Grate some cheese on top if desired. 
Put in the oven 10 or 15 minutes and serve. R. O. D. 

NUT LOAF. 
Extra Fine for Sandwiches. 

One cup sugar, 1 cup sweet milk, 1 cup chopped walnuts, 
1 egg, 4 scant cups flour, two teaspoons baking powder, */% tea- 
spoon butter. Mix, put into greased pan, let stand 20 minutes, 
bake in a slow oven from % hour to 1 hour. When cold, slice 
thin and place Sw r iss cheese between slices. Serve either with 
butter sauce or mustard sauce. 



VEGETABLES 43 

BUTTER SAUCE. 

One tablespoon melted butter, little black pepper and little 
salt. Pour over tips. 

MUSTARD SAUCE. 

A few drops of onion juice, % teaspoon dry mustard, salt, 
black pepper, 1 tablespoon of vinegar, % tablespoon olive oil. 

HORSERADISH SAUCE. 

One-quarter cup grated horseradish, % cup whipped cream, 
2 teaspoons vinegar, 1 teaspoon sugar, 1 teaspoon salt, y tea- 
spoon mustard. Beat thoroughly and chill. Very fine for roast 
beef. 



44 VEGETABLES 

ADDITIONAL RECIPES 



Salads 



When a head of lettuce has the leaves so tightly curled that 
it seems impossible to detach them without tearing, fill a large 
pan with cold water and immerse the lettuce, quickly shaking 
it about, and it will unfold. After washing wrap the leaves in 
a moist napkin and lay on the ice for at least half an hour, when 
the lettuce will become quite crisp, even if it has been rather 
wilted. 

FRENCH DRESSING. 

Saltspoon of salt, % saltspoon of pepper, J /4 teaspoon of 
onion juice, tablespoon of vinegar, 3 tablespoons of olive oil. 
Mix in order given, adding oil slowly. The onion may be omit- 
ted and lemon juice may be used instead of vinegar. 

GERMAN CHEESE DRESSING. 

Rub 2 tablespoons of soft American cheese with 6 table- 
spoons of thick sour cream, add two tablespoons vinegar, a 
teaspoon of onion juice, a saltspoon of salt, a dust of pepper, 
and a teaspoon of Worcestershire sauce. Mix and use on cold 
sauerkraut or finely shaved cabbage. Use the sauerkraut raw, 
well washed, and soaked in cold water for several hours. 

QUICK MAYONNAISE DRESSING. 

One tablespoon dry mustard, 1 teaspoon salt, % gill of lard, 
Vz teaspoon vinegar, % pint sweet oil, 1 raw egg. Mix the 
mustard, salt and pepper with 1% teaspoons vinegar in bowl; 
add the egg and beat well. Steady the bowl and pour the oil 
in a thin continuous stream while a brisk beating is kept up 
with the right hand. When thick add the vinegar slowly. 
Mrs. H. N. B. 

SALAD DRESSING. 

One quart olive oil, J /2 cup vinegar, 1% tablespoons salt, 1 
tablespoon sugar, 1% tablespoons mustard, 3 eggs. Wet mustard. 
Take IVa tablespoons of the mixed mustard in a large bowl and 
pour in the oil very slowly, beating until it will not take more 
without separating. Break in 1 whole egg. Add oil gradually 
and the other 2 eggs. Beat until very stiff, then add the vinegar 
and seasoning. Pour into 2 pint Mason jars and seal. This 
will keep indefinitely. B. R. P. 



46 SALADS 

SALAD DRESSING. 

(This will keep for several days and will not separate.) 
Yolks of 2 eggs, % teaspoon mustard, 1 cup olive oil, juice 
of 1 lemon mixed with 1 tablespoon vinegar. Beat the 2 yolks 
and add the mustard. Beat in the olive oil 1 teaspoon at a time 
until it begins to thicken. Then begin alternately with the 
lemon juice and the oil, a teaspoon at a time, until all is used. 
Add the beaten whites of the 2 eggs, 1 tablespoon flour, 2 small 
cups water. Cook slowly, stirring until it thickens. Do not 
boil. When cool add % teaspoon salt and little cayenne pepper. 

COOKED SALAD DRESSING. 

One tablespoon butter melted in bowl, 1 teaspoon each mus- 
tard, sugar, salt, little cayenne, % cup each vinegar and hot 
water; yolks 3 eggs. Beat yolks well and mix smoothly with 
mustard. Heat butter and gradually add to mixture, then add 
vinegar and water. Add teaspoon flour and water, mix and 
cook until it thickens. Mrs. M. C. C. 

DRESSING FOR ANY FRUIT SALAD. 

Half cup sugar, 1 rounding teaspoon flour, 1 well beaten egg, 
juice 1 lemon, ^4 cup cold water, small piece butter, pinch of 
salt. Cook in double boiler till creamy. When cold stir in V-> 
cup cream. (Mix the dry ingredients first.) 

GERMAN SALAD DRESSING FOR LETTUCE. 

One cup thick cream, 2 tablespoons lemon juice, % teaspoon 
salt, pepper. Beat cream quite stiff, add seasoning, then lemon 
juice very slowly, beating all the time. Chill before using. 

SOUR CREAM SALAD DRESSING. 

Beat the yolks of 2 eggs until light, stir in gradually % cup 
of thick, sour cream, add % teaspoon salt, a dash of pepper, 2 
tablespoons tarragon vinegar, and the well-beaten whites of the 
eggs. 

LORENZE DRESSING FOR TOMATOES. 

Two-thirds Mayonnaise, % whipped cream, sweetened; a 
little Heinze chili sauce, and a few chopped chives. 

MAYONNAISE. 

One egg, yolk beaten slightly, then add (little at a time) 1 
cup olive oil; teaspoon salt, % teaspoon sugar, juice of 1 lemon. 
Add the well beaten white, and a little paprika. W. S. 



SALADS 47 

TO MAKE GOOD MUSTARD. 

One-third cup mustard (Coleman's), % teaspoon granulated 
sugar and a taste of salt. Mix with boiling water until a paste. 
Fine. Mrs. J. M. F. 

OYSTER COCKTAILS IN PEPPER. 

Cut the stem end of green and red sweet peppers, remove 
the seeds, and stand the peppers in a dish of cracked ice. Put 
in 4 tablespoons of tomato catsup, 2 of lemon juice, and dash 
^f tabasco. Put in each fine nice, small, fat oysters, and serve. 

PRUNE SALAD. 

Prepare large prunes as for ordinary use. Remove the pits 
and fill the prunes with a fine Waldorf salad, (apples, nuts, 
celery and mayonnaise dressing). Arrange the stuffed prunes 
on crisp lettuce leaves and add touches of mayonnaise. E. H. 
W. 

PEAR SALAD. 

Pare and slice a pear. Remove stem and part of center. 
Fill space with mixed chopped apple and celery and mayon- 
naise. Garnish with chopped walnuts and maraschino cherries. 
H. W. M. 

FRUIT AND NUT SALAD. 

Orange, apple, and banana sliced and mayonnaise dressing, 
over which sprinkle chopped nuts or grape nuts, or both. 

RIPE OLIVES AND COTTAGE CHEESE SALAD. 

Slice the olives. One-third olives and two-thirds cheese. 
Mayonnaise dressing. Sprinkle with grape nuts. 

PINEAPPLE SALAD. 

Arrange a slice of canned pineapple on lettuce leaves for 
each person. Stuff a bell pepper with cottage cheese seasoned 
with salt and cayenne. Slice pepper and garnish pineapple with 
peppers and halves English walnut meats and serve with mayon- 
naise dressing. Pears either fresh or canned are delicious pre- 
pared in the same way. Mrs. E. J. McK. 

ONE, TWO, SALAD. 

Free 1 grape fruit and 2 oranges from seed and membrane; 
cut into sections. Skin and seed 1 cup of Malaga grapes. Mix 
the fruit and add % cup pecans, chopped fine. Arrange on bed 
of lettuce, and serve with French dressing. 



48 SALADS 

TOMATO JELLY SALAD. 

Soak 2 box gelatin in cold water; place 1 quart can toma- 
toes in sauce-pan, add 1 dry pepper (whole), 1 onion sliced, 
tablespoon chopped parsley, tablespoon chopped celery; salt to 
taste. Cook until onion is tender; push through strainer; bring 
to a boil and turn over gelatin; beat well; turn in to small molds 
and cool. Serve on lettuce leaves and mayonnaise. Make sand- 
wiches of rye bread and Swiss cheese; put in oven and toast; 
serve immediately. 

ALMOND SALAD. 

V-2 pound blanched almonds, % pound seeded raisins, 1 cup 
celery cut fine. Serve with mayonnaise on lettuce leaves or in 
apple cups, the center of which may be added to salad. H. S. 

NUT SALAD. 

1 pound malaga grapes, 1 pound English walnuts, 1 sour 
apple, 2 bananas. Cut the grapes in halves and remove the 
seeds. Break the nuts, do not chop them. 

DRESSING. 

1 tablespoon flour, % cup vinegar, 1 tablespoon butter, 2 
tablespoons sugar, 3 eggs beaten separately. When cold add 
large cup of whipped cream. Mix with the fruit and nuts just 
before serving. This will serve twelve or fourteen. E. C. 

SARDINE BALLS IN CUCUMBERS. 

Remove the skins and tails from 1 box of sardines; rub the 
sardines to a paste, add a teaspoon of Worcestershire sauce, a 
dash of salt, a drop of tabasco, and form the paste into balls 
the size of an English walnut. Peel a good-sized cucumber and 
cut it into half-inch slices, remove the seeds; soak the cucumber 
in cold water without salt for 1 or 2 hours. At serving time 
put a sardine ball on each slice and place the slices in a nest 
of lettuce leaves. Serve with French dressing. 0. A. T. 

CRAB "LOUIS." 

Cut in pieces meat of 2 crabs, tear 2 heads lettuce in small 
pieces, add 6 hard boiled eggs. Pour over this a French dress- 
ing to which has been added much paprika and sufficient toma- 
to catsup to make it red and thick. Serve in lettuce leaves. 
Half of this will serve 6 People. L. K. 

CHICKEN SALAD. 

Boil 1 chicken tender. Chop moderately fine the whites of 
eight boiled eggs and the chicken. Add a teacup each of 



SALADS 49 

chopped celery and cabbage. Mash the yolks fine; add 2 tea- 
spoons butter, 2 of sugar, 1 of mustard; pepper and salt to 
taste. V-2 cup good vinegar and mix thoroughly. Have a border 
of lettuce leaves around salad. When ready to serve pour over 
mayonnaise. W. C. C. 

RICE SALAD. 

Rub a bowl with a clove of garlic cut in halves; put into it 
a cup of cold, boiled rice, so cooked that the grains are distinct. 
Mix together 3 tablespoons of olive oil, 1 tablespoon of vinegar, 
^4 teaspoon of salt, and a generous J /4 teaspoon of paprika. Mix 
together thoroughly and pour over the rice. With a spoon and 
fork lift the rice to mix the dressing through it. Add ^ cup of 
cucumber cubes or slices of celery and mix again. Put the mix- 
ture into tomatoes, hollowed out for the purpose. Serve on a 
bed of lettuce or shredded cabbage, dressed with the same 
measure of French dressing as was prepared for the rice. 

CROUTONS, GENOESE FASHION. 

Stamp out as many rounds of stale bread as there are indi- 
viduals to be served; spread lightly with butter and brown in 
the oven. When cold spread with anchovy paste. Have ready 
a small heart leaf of lettuce for each round of bread; set these 
above the bread and on each dispose a slightly rounding teaspoon 
of egg salad. For the salad chop fine hard cooked eggs; add % 
the bulk of chopped olives and whole capers, and mix with 
enough mayonnaise dressing to hold the mass together. Gar- 
nish with a figure cut from pickled beet or with fine-chopped 
pickled beet. Serve as an appetizer at dinner or luncheon. An- 
chovies put up in oil may be used instead of the anchovy paste. 
The anchovies in oil will keep several months after the bottle is 
opened. The paste will not keep as well. In using the anchovies 
wipe them free of oil, scrape the flesh from the skin and pound it 
smooth with a pestle; add % the measure of butter and pound 
until the two are smoothly blended, then press through a fine 
sieve. A bit of red pepper pod, chopped exceedingly fine, and 
a few drops of onion juice are an agreeable addition to the 
mayonnaise dressing used for these croutons. 



EGG AND BEAT SALAD. 

One good-sized beet or several slices of pickled beet, 2 salt- 
spoon pepper, 6 eggs, 1 saltspoon salt, 1 lemon. Chop the beet 
rather fine in a shallow pan. Poach the eggs carefully. Lift 
them on a skimmer, dish, and sprinkle with the lemon juice 
and dust with salt and pepper. When ready to serve, put each 



50 SALADS 

egg, which is now cold and neatly trimmed, into the center of 
a nest of lettuce leaves. Cover with the chopped beet, and put 
in the center of each a teaspoon of mayonnaise dressing. Serve 
at once, with nut sandwiches. 

INDIVIDUAL CROWN SALAD. 

First select perfect apples of exceptionally fine flavor, 1 
for each guest. Pare and core the apples carefully, and cut off 
a small slice at one end, to allow the apples to stand erect. 
Then cut each apple into eight equal parts, and arrange in a 
circle on the serving plate. Within the "crown" outline thus 
formed, arrange heart leaves of lettuce, and fill with a salad 
made as follows: Cut slices of pear into fine pieces and mix 
with broken English walnuts, or celery and shredded green 
pepper may be substituted for the pear, if preferred. Serve 
with mayonnaise dressing made without mustard, to which 
whipped cream has been added. B. 



SALADS 51 

ADDITIONAL RECIPES 



Entrees 

CREAMED BRAINS. 

Soak calve's brains in cold water for 1 hour, changing it 
twice, and adding to last water a little vinegar and salt. Tie 
brains in cheese cloth and put in boiling water with 1 bay leaf, 
1 blade mace and few cloves. Cook 20 minutes. Drain, and 
blanch in cold water. Heat in double boiler 1 cup cream. 
Blend thoroughly 1 tablespoon butter with 1 level tablespoon 
sifted flour and stir in 2 tablespoons cold cream or milk. Pour 
hot cream gradually over blended butter and flour, return all to 
stove and cook 15 minutes. Add brains and 1 level teaspoon 
salt and 1 teaspoon kitchen bouquet. 

DEVILED CLAMS. 

Melt in a saucepan 2 heaping tablespoons butter. When 
brown, 1 chopped onion, 12 chopped clams, 4 skinned and 
chopped tomatoes, seasoning of salt, pepper and paprika. Cook 
for % hour. Add 1 teaspoon of mushroom catsup, % cup of 
bread crumbs; beat thoroughly. Wash clam shells well and fill 
with mixture. Sprinkle few crumbs on top of each, dot with 
butter and bake in hot oven 15 minutes. Serve garnished with 
parsley. L. K. 

DEVILED SHRIMPS. 

To each pint of shrimps allow 1 tablespoon butter, 2 table- 
spoons flour and 2 cups of cream or milk. Melt the butter, add 
the flour and stir until smooth; add the milk and stir constantly 
until the mixture thickens; add 3 hard-boiled eggs pressed 
through a sieve, and the shrimps chopped fine. Season with 1 
teaspoon salt, 2 tablespoons chopped parsley, 1 saltspoon of 
pepper, and a dash of cayenne. Fill greased shells with the 
mixture, cover top with bread crumbs and bits of butter, and 
brown in a quick oven. Mrs. E. J. McK. 

RAW TOMATOES AND WHIPPED CREAM. 

Peel large, smooth tomatoes carefully and set on ice until 
chilled. Cut each in half when ready to serve, sprinkle lightly 
with salt and paprika and heap with whipped cream. A wel- 
come entree in summer. Send around heated and buttered 
crackers, and cream cheese with them or thin slices of buttered 
graham bread. 



ENTREES 53 

FOR THE CASSEROLE. 

Take 1 pound of sirloin or the ends of a rib roast; cut into 
squares. Cover with flour and brown in iron frying pan. Place 
this into casserole, then add some water to frying pan and put 
same over meat. Cut 1 onion, carrot, celery and green pepper 
into small pieces and put it with meat. Add 2 cloves, and Lee 
& Perrin sauce to taste. Put salt in after above has cooked 
slowly for some time. Bake in slow oven for several hours. 
I. C. 

QUICK MEAL. 

One can corn with 2 cans tomatoes sliced in a little milk or 
stock and butter; bake till it is heated through. C. A. S. 

TAMALE LOAF. 

One can corn, V-2 can tomatoes, 1 scant cup cornmeal, 2 eggs, 
\V-2 cup milk, 1 bell pepper chopped, 1 teaspoon salt, 1 bottle 
pimolas chopped, 1 teaspoon grandma's Spanish pepper, % 
chopped onion. Bake 1 hour. R. C. 

TAMALE LOAF. 

One medium sized onion chopped very fine and fry to light 
brown in olive oil. 1 A can tomatoes and let cook until soft; add 
to this 1 can of corn and stir up with IVz cups of yellow corn 
meal, 3 eggs beaten and % cup of milk. Put all together and 
add 10 cents worth chopped ripe olives, 1 can chicken chopped, 
1 teaspoon of grandmother's pepper dissolved in a tiny bit of 
water, salt and black pepper and a little red pepper. Put in 
well greased baking pan and bake in slow oven for 1 hour. If 
it seems too thin, add a little more corn meal but not too much 
as it thickens while baking. Mrs. F. F. C. 

TAMALE DE CASUELA. 

Two cups yellow corn meal, 2 eggs, 1 pint olives, green or 
ripe, 2 pounds of pork for stew or a chicken; flour, butter or 
lard; salt, chili powder. Gebhardt's chili pepper. Utensils 
frying pan, 2 stew pans, baking dish, 2 inches across and 3 
deep. If pork is used remove all fat and bones, then cut in 
small pieces about 2 inches in size, boil till tender. When done 
have hot frying pan and about 2 cooking spoons of lard or drip- 
pings or butter. Season with salt, a little garlic. Remove meat 
to frying pan, leaving the broth till later. Fry meat quite 
brown, stirring as it is liable to stick. Add more lard if neces- 
sary to fry in. When meat is quite brown add a cup of broth. 
Add 2 tablespoons chili powder and stir well. Then dredge 
with flour and stir well, then let this simmer on the back of 
the stove until you make porridge; add more broth if too dry. 



54 ENTREES 

PORRIDGE. 

Have a large pot with a quart of boiling water. Add a 
teaspoon of salt. Put in gently 2 cups of corn meal, stirring 
all the time. Cook this as for mush, it must be quite thick. 

Add broth if too thick to handle. Add 2 eggs well beaten. 
Stir in 2 tablespoons lard. Line bottom of baking dish with a 
layer of porridge. Add a layer of meat and olives; cover with 
porridge meat and olives. Bake slowly 1 hour. Mrs. R. R. P. 

LUNCH ENTREE. 

Can of corn, cup of olives (chopped), 2 cans tamales, cup 
of cheese (cut fine), season; put butter on top and bake about 
40 minutes. S. R. J. 

MOCK TAMALE. 

Make thin corn meal mush, line a buttered oven pan with 
this; place layer of meat and layer of tomatoes in pan; (meat 
and tomatoes to be cooked and seasoned before mixing), put 
few olives and few raisins in meat part; season highly with salt, 
pepper and Spanish pepper. Cover the top with corn meal 
mush and bake until brown. Mrs. F. C. 

BONDINES (AN ENTREE). 
Sufficient for 15 People 

Boil with 3 pounds veal or 3% pounds chicken until tender 
and chop meat fine. Add 3 rolled crackers, 1 beaten egg, butter, 
pepper and salt to taste. Then add 2 cup milk and % cup of 
liquor in which meat was boiled. Flavor with water in which 
onion has been boiled. Grease small tin custard cups and fill 
% full of mixture. Set cups in pan of water in oven and bake 
15 minutes. Serve while hot with mushroom sauce. 

MUSHROOM SAUCE 

Take 25c can mushrooms, chop a little, add all the liquor 
in can, 1 pint milk, butter, pepper and salt; heat and thicken. 
Serve Rondines while hot with sauce, on bread and butter plates, 
and add 1 teaspoon of canned peas. Very fine. Mrs. I. P. D. 

DEERFOOT POTATOES. 

Wash and pare potatoes of uniform size. Remove a portion 
from center of each with apple corer. Fill these cavities with 
sausages and insert rounds of potatoes to hide filling. Rake in 
a pan until soft. L. K. 

SWEET POTATO CROQUETTES. 

Mash as many sweet potatoes as desired, with can of oys- 



ENTREES 55 

ters, salt and pepper, 1 egg. Form into croquettes, roll in egg 
and bread crumbs and fry in deep lard. If a sauce is desired, 
the following is fine: Use liquor from oysters (more oysters 
may be added if desired), % cup butter, % cup flour and 1 cup 
stock. Bring to boiling point; pepper and salt. L. K. 



RICE AND NUT CROQUETTES. 

Make a white sauce as follows: 2 tablespoons butter, 2 
tablespoons flour, 1 cup milk. Into this prepared sauce mix 
2 cups of cooked rice, 1 cup of chopped peanuts or bleached 
almonds. Season with few drops of onion and lemon juice, 
salt and cayenne pepper to taste. Prepare and fry same as 
chicken croquettes. K, D. G. 

TOMATO TOAST. 

Run a quart of stewed tomatoes through a colander, place 
in a porcelain stew-pan, season with butter, pepper, salt and 
sugar to taste. Cut bread thin, brown on both sides, butter and 
lay on a platter. Just before serving add some sweet cream 
to the tomatoes and pour over the toast. Serve quickly or it 
will get too soft. M. I). B. 

A DISH FOR SUNDAY. 

Supper or Informal Luncheon, or an Entree. 
(For Eight People) 

Make a rich white sauce, using plenty of butter, 1 pint of 
milk and Vz cup of cream. Into this sauce stir Vs can "hotel 
mushrooms," 2 hard boiled eggs, cut in pieces; 1 cup cooked 
macaroni, cut in % lengths; % cup of veal or chicken cut in 
dice. Put in baking dish. Sprinkle with grated cheese or 
buttered crumbs, and bake 20 or 30 minutes. The proportions 
of mushroom, egg, meat and macaroni can be varied to suit the 
taste, but there should be as many cups of these ingredients 
taken together, as there are cups of liquid used in making the 
white sauce. Flavor with salt, pepper, paprika and sherry to 
taste. R. C. 

A GOOD ENTREE. 

Take 10 cents' worth of hamburger steak, 1 cup of spaghet- 
ti cooked, 1 small can of tomatoes, 1 onion fried in drippings, 
1 clove of garlic, salt to taste, a dash of cayenne, 1 teaspoon 
chili powder. Mix all together with grated cheese on top and 
cook slowly half hour. Very nice for lunch. 



56 ENTREES 

DEVILED HAM AND OLIVES 

Take a couple of cans of deviled ham and mix into them a 
cup of bread crumbs, about six olives, chopped fine (olives 
either pitted or stuffed with tomatoes, will do), and one tomato. 
Add a speck of paprika and salt to taste. After these have been 
thoroughly mixed together, put in an agate pudding dish or a 
tin one will do, and cook in a hot oven 25 minutes. Add a little 
hot water once during the 25 minutes in the oven. 



ENTREES 57 

ADDITIONAL RECIPES 



Eggs 



SPANISH OMELET. 

First, prepare the following chili sauce: Fry a good-sized 
onion to a golden brown; add a quart of tomatoes, 4 or 5 red 
peppers, 2 tablespoons of butter and a pinch of salt; set the mix- 
ture on back of stove to boil gently. Pour a cup of warm milk 
over the same quantity of bread crumbs, add a little melted 
butter; salt, the well beaten yolks of six eggs, and lastly, the 
whites whipped very stiff. Put this into a hot well buttered 
omelet pan, cover tightly; cook over a moderate fire about 15 
minutes. Then remove lid and put in oven to brown. Lay 
omelet, without folding, on a large platter garnished with 
parsley; pour over it the chili sauce and serve immediately. 
M. H M. 

A DELICIOUS OMELET. 

Four eggs, 4 tablespoons water, pepper and salt to taste. 
Separate eggs and beat whites to a stiff froth. Beat the yolks. 
Add water and beat again. Put a tablespoon of butter in a frying 
pan, and while it is heating, carefully fold the yolks into the 
beaten whites, adding the seasoning. Pour into frying pan and 
when under side is a delicate brown place in hot oven to set 
the top. The moment it is done loosen the edges from the pan, 
fold over and serve on hot platter. E. W. C. 

BAKED OMELET. 

Thicken % of a cup of milk with a soup-spoon of corn- 
starch. Beat the yolks of 2 eggs with % teaspoon of salt and 
stir into the thickened milk after it has cooled a little. Beat the 
whites until very light and stir them in quickly. Bake in 
buttered dish or ramekins until puffy and brown about 25 
minutes and serve immediately. Mrs. C. M. M. 

CODFISH OMELET. 

Shred cooked salt codfish in fine pieces. To each cup of 
fish allow a cup of milk and 1 egg, 1 tablespoon butter and 1 
of flour. Make a cream sauce of the above; add to codfish. Bake 
V 2 hour. E. C. 

BAKED EGGS. 

To 2 cups hot riced potatoes add 2 tablespoons butter, Vs 



EGGS 59 

cup rich milk, MJ teaspoon salt. Beat hard three minutes; add 
\V-2 cans pimientos forced through strainer and continue the 
beating until thoroughly blended. Pile on buttered baking dish 
and make a few cavities, in each of which drop an egg. Bake 
until eggs are set. L. K. 

CHINESE EGGS. 

Put 6 eggs in boiling water, cover, let stand away from the 
iire for 45 minutes; remove the shells, and cut the eggs into 
slices. Put 2 level tablespoons of butter and 2 of flour in the 
blazer over the hot-water-pan, add Vz cup of stock, % cup milk, 
Vz teaspoon of salt, and % teaspoon of black pepper. Stir until 
the sauce thickens; add the eggs, and cover for a moment; dust 
with a tablespoon of chopped parsley, and serve. 

BEAUREGARD EGGS. 

Put 5 eggs into warm water, and bring to a boil; then keep 
them just below boiling point thirty minutes; put them at once 
into cold water. Remove the shells, separate the yolks and 
whites, chop the whites very fine, and put the yolks through 
a vegetable press or sieve. Toast 5 slices of bread; butter them 
while hot. Rub together 2 level tablespoons each of flour and 
butter, add % pint of milk, and stir until boiling; add % tea- 
spoon of salt, a dash of black pepper, and the whites of the 
eggs; when smoking-hot pour this over the toast, sprinkle over 
the yolks, dust lightly with salt and pepper, and send to the 
table. 

EGGS A LA MARTIN. 

Half pint cream sauce; cover the bottom of a pie plate or in- 
dividual ramekin dishes with the cream sauce and drop 6 eggs 
into the plate, or 1 into each ramekin dish; sprinkle with 
grated cheese and cover with the remaining cream sauce. 
Stand the dishes in a pan of hot water, and bake in a moderate 
oven 5 minutes. Serve at once. Mrs. H. N. B. 



60 EGGS 

ADDITIONAL RECIPES 



Cheese and Chafing Dish 

Fill the chafing-dish lamp before beginning to cook, as it 
always delays cooking to have to refill during the operation. An 
alcohol filler is a great convenience and removes the danger that 
always attends filling the chafing-dish from a bottle. The hot- 
water pan is used for keeping materials hot in case of a second 
helping, although most people have better success with a Welsh 
rarebit made over hot water. For raw-meat dishes, as beef pats 
and the breasts of birds, use the blazer for first cooking. Un- 
less you wish fine-powdered cheese, do not take the time to 
grate it. Put it through the meat chopper, which will cut fine 
very dry, hard cheese. The soft American cheese, though rather 
unpalatable if eaten uncooked, has great possibilities when 
mixed with other materials and heated. Frequently it is too 
soft to be grated on an ordinary grater, when it must be 
chopped fine or rasped. To keep it in summer, wrap it in 
waxed paper, then in tissue paper, and put it in a tin box in a 
cool place. If the house is damp, wipe the cheese all over with 
pure grain alcohol and then wrap it up. 

CHEESE BALLS. 

Mix a quarter pound of soft American cheese with 1 beaten 
egg, add % teaspoon of salt, a dash of cayenne, and sufficient 
stale' bread crumbs to make a stiff paste. Form in balls the size 
of English walnuts, dip in beaten egg, roll in dry crumbs, and 
fry in hot fat. Serve hot with lettuce or cress salad. 

CHEESE BALLS. 

Add 2 tablespoons of melted butter to % pint of dry cottage 
cheese; rub until smooth, add % teaspoon of salt, a saltspoon of 
paprika, and a dash of black pepper. Form into balls the size 
of English walnuts, roll in finely chopped nuts, and put aside 
to cool. Serve as a cheese course with lettuce and crackers. Z. 



CHEESE PUDDING. 

In England and Switzerland this pudding forms the night 
meal for the laboring classes. It is very nutritious and more 
easily digested than the Welsh rarebit. Grate or chop % pound 
of soft American cheese. Toast and butter 4 slices of bread; 



62 CHEESE AND CHAFING DISH 

put 2 slices in the bottom of a baking-dish, cover with l /2 of the 
cheese, dust lightly with salt and pepper, put over the other 2 
slices and the remaining cheese. Pour over 1 pint of milk, let 
it stand 5 minutes, and bake in a quick oven 20 minutes. This 
will serve four people. Six slices of bread may be used instead 
of 4, with the same amount of cheese, adding an extra cup of 
milk. 

CHEESE FONDUE. 

2 cups milk, with pinch of soda, 1 cup fine bread, Vz pound 
dry cheese, grated; 4 eggs, a little butter, pepper and salt. 

SWISS FONDUE. 

Cover 1 cup of stale bread crumbs with 1 pint of milk and 
let it stand 15 minutes. Beat 2 eggs, without separating, add 
them to the milk and bread, add 2 pound of chopped cheese, 
% teaspoon of salt, a dash of cayenne, a saltspoon of baking- 
soda dissolved in a tablespoon of water, and a tablespoon of 
melted butter. Beat thoroughly, turn into a baking-dish, and 
bake in a quick oven until a delicate brown. D. L. 

DEVILED CHEESE. 

Two cakes Neufchatel cheese, butter size of one cheese, small 
pinch salt, and plenty of white pepper to make it hot; two table- 
spoons cream (water will do), % tablespoon of soda to sweeten 
cheese; % teaspoon Burnett's onion extract; rub together in a 
bowl until very smooth and pack solid in 2 medium sized sweet 
peppers. Add a little chopped pepper in mixture if desired. 
Put on ice and when firm slice and serve with salads. De- 
licious for sandwiches. 

CHEESE SOUFFLE. 

Three eggs, 1 cup cream, 6 tablespoons grated cheese. Season 
with paprika and salt. Beat the eggs separately, add cream 
and cheese to yolks, stir in the beaten whites and lastly add the 
seasoning. Fill ramekins with the mixture, set them in a pan 
containing some boiling water, set the pan in the oven and bake 
about 20 minutes. Serve immediately. Mrs. T. B. R. 



A CHEESE RELISH. 

Place in baking dish alternate layers of thin buttered bread 
and grated Eastern cheese. Pour over the bread and cheese 1% 
cups milk into which has been stirred 2 well-beaten eggs, a 
little salt and cayenne pepper. Bake like a custard for about 
V 2 hour. K. D. G. 



CHEESE AND CHAFING DISH 63 

MACARONI RAREBIT. 

Early in the day boil 4 ounces of spaghetti; throw it into 
cold water, let it stand at least 2 hours, then drain and cut it 
into inch lengths. At serving time put % pound of grated, soft, 
American cheese into the chafing-dish, and a teaspoon of Wor- 
cestershire sauce, a tablespoon of tomato catsup, % teaspoon of 
salt, and a dash of pepper. Beat the yolk of 1 egg with 4 table- 
spoons of water; add it to the cheese mixture; light the lamp, 
and stir continuously until the cheese is melted and soft; lastly 
add the spaghetti; stir until the spaghetti is hot, and serve im- 
mediately. 

WELSH RAREBIT. 

Half pound rich Eastern cheese, 1 cup milk, 1 teaspoon mus- 
tard, 1 teaspoon salt, a little cayenne pepper or a few drops of 
Worcestershire sauce. Break the cheese in small pieces, or if 
hard, grate it. Put with milk in double boiler. Mix mustard, 
salt and pepper; add egg and beat well. When cheese is melted 
stir in egg and cook till it thickens a little, stirring constantly. 
Pour over slices of toast. 

CHEESE PUFFS. 

Heat V-i cup of butter and 1 of water in a saucepan, and 
when boiling add % cup each of flour and grated cheese. Cook 
for 3 minutes, stirring well; season with salt and cayenne and 
allow the mixture to partly cool; then add 2 unbeaten eggs, 
singly, beating each in very thoroughly. Drop by teaspoonfuls 
on a buttered sheet and bake in a moderate oven about 20 min- 
utes. Serve hot. Mrs. J. H. S. 

BARBECUED HAM. 

Trim neatly 1 thin slice of cold boiled ham, cut it into 
quarters. Put 2 level tablespoons of butter, 2 of tomato catsup, 
and 4 of sherry in the blazer; when hot put in the ham; turn 
quickly once or twice, and serve. 

CHEESE NEUVEAU (EXCELLENT LUNCHEON DISH). 

Pieces of bread cut as if for the table, thinly buttered and 
placed in a frying pan. Sprinkle salt very lightly over them 
and add a thick layer of grated cheese, then another layer of 
bread and salted cheese, and, when the pan is full, pour over a 
cup of milk. Cover closely and stand on side of stove, where it 
will steam slowly for 20 to 30 minutes. Turn on hot platter 
and serve at once. 

CHEESE CREAM TOAST. 

Toast slices of bread and cover them slightly with grated 



64 CHEESE AND CHAFING DISH 

cheese. For 10 slices make a cream of 1 pint of milk and 2 
tablespoons of flour. The milk should be boiling hot and the 
flour mixed in a little cold water before stirring in. When the 
cream is nicely cooked, season with salt and butter; set the 
toast and cheese in the oven for 3 or 4 minutes and then pour 
the cream over them. 

CHICKEN A LA KING. 

Put 2 tablespoons each of butter and flour in the blazer; 
mix, add % pint of milk. Stir, add the meat of 1 chicken diced, 
2 tablespoons of green pepper, 1 dozen sliced mushrooms. 
When hot put blazer in water pan. Z. 



CHEESE AND CHAFING DISH 65 

ADDITIONAL RECIPES 



Conserves, Jams, Etc. 

A GOOD APPETIZER. 

One pound good temper, 1 pound of patience, 3 pounds of 
usefulness, 2 pounds of cheerfulness, 2 pounds of forebearance, 
\Vz pounds of contentment, 1 pound of fun. Mix well with 2 
quarts of human kindness, one wine glass full the first thing 
every morning. To be repeated as soon as effectiveness wears 
off. E. W. C. 

ISABELLA GRAPE JAM. 

Remove pulp from medium ripe Isabella grapes, put pulp 
onto simmer until it seems to separate from the seeds. Take 
from fire and pour through a coarse sieve, rub all that will not 
go through of itself with spoon or potato masher. This process 
is simply to do away with the seeds. Measure this pulp by cups 
and add sugar in equal number of cups. Weigh the skins and 
add sugar in equal number of pounds. Mix pulp and skins and 
boil about 20 minutes. One will have better results if only 
small Quantities are made at a time. Mrs. T. B. R. 

GRAPE CONSERVE. 

Four pounds Malaga grapes, 1 pound raisins (seeded), 4 cups 
sugar, 1 lemon, 3 oranges, 1 cup English walnuts. First take 
the seeds out of the grapes. Use only the juice and pulp of the 
oranges. Use the juice and grated rind of the lemon. Cook 
all except sugar and nuts for % hour. Then add sugar. Cook 
until thick. Then add the chopped nuts. Pour into jelly 
glasses. E. C. 

PINEAPPLE CONSERVE. 

One pineapple (or 2 of canned), cut fine; 4 cups rhubard cut 
fine, 8 cups sugar (or 7 if canned apple is used), 1 lemon rind 
grated, 2 oranges run through meat grinder, % pound blanched 
almonds cut fine; cook 1 hour. C. A. S. 

DELICIOUS CHERRY PRESERVE. 

Three and a half pounds cherries, 2Vz pounds sugar, % 
pound raisins, 3 oranges. Stone cherries and cook in their own 
juice slowly 15 minutes. Heat the sugar in oven and add to 
cherries and raisins and juice and pulp of oranges. Cook until 
about as thick as marmalade. H. W. M. 



CONSERVES, JAMS, ETC. 67 

CHERRY JAM. 

Two and a half pounds of currants, 2% pounds of cherries, 
2V-2 pounds raspberries, 3% pounds sugar. Cook sugar and cur- 
rants 20 minutes; add the cherries (stoned), and cook until 
glassy. Drop in the raspberries and cook a few minutes longer. 
Then put in jelly glasses. E. M. C. 

TOMATO JAM. 

Scald 12 large tomatoes; cut them up; use cup for cup of 
sugar and tomatoes; cut up 4 lemons, rind also; teaspoon 
cloves. Let stew until glazed, which takes about 3 hours. 

ORANGE MARMALADE. 

Wash a dozen oranges and slice as thinly as possible rind 
and all, rejecting the first and last slices. Add the juice of 3 
lemons put in bowl, cover with cold water and let stand for 
24 hours. Then boil without draining, until the rinds are ten- 
der, remove from fire and set away for another 24 hours. Add 

1 cup of sugar for every cup of this pulp and boil slowly until 
the marmalade is clear and thick. Marmalade made in this way 
will not be bitter. Mrs. O. M. M. 

FIG MARMALADE. 

To 3 pounds of pared figs add the juice and grated rind of 

2 lemons, and juice of 2 oranges, 2 pounds of granulated sugar. 
Boil slowly 1 hour, then pour hot into jelly glasses. A. T. S. 

ORANGE MARMALADE. 

Five large oranges and 1 lemon. Wash well, slice as thin 
as possible in half, round slices. Weigh. Add 3 pints of water 
to each pound of fruit. Let stand in cool place 24 hours. Then 
boil rapidly 45 minutes, stirring occasionally. Let stand an- 
other 24 hours. Weigh again; add juice of 1 lemon and put 
on the stove. Just as the fruit is ready to boil add to each 
pound 1% pounds of warm sugar. Boil 45 minutes as fast as 
possible. Stir as needed, only. Take off stove and empty in 
jars. 

PERFECTION PRESERVES. 

Stem and rinse strawberries and put in a preserving kettle. 
Cover with 1 cup of sugar for every cup of fruit and set on the 
back of the stove where it will heat slowly but not cook, until 
the sugar is melted. Then put the kettle where it will boil and 
let the preserves boil as hard as possible, up to the top of the 
kettle for eight or nine minutes. Do not stir while cooking, 
and seal hot. This method produces whole fruit in clear jelly, 
and may be used for any kind of berries. Mrs. O. M. M. 



68 CONSERVES, JAMS, ETC. 

QUINCE HONEY. 

One cup grated quince; add 2 cups water, 2 cups sugar. 
Boil until thick. I. C. 

MRS HARRISON'S PICKLES, "FINE." 

Four quarts green tomatoes, 2 quarts ripe tomatoes, 1 dozen 
cucumbers, 1 head of cabbage, 1 dozen green peppers, 2 large 
onions, 2 pounds white sugar, 5 cents celery seed and mustard 
seed, 1 tablespoon cloves, 2 tablespoons cinnamon, 2 quarts of 
best vinegar. Slice vegetables, sprinkle layer after layer with 
salt, let stand over night. Drain and put through meat chopper, 
add seeds, spice, sugar and vinegar and let come to boil. Makes 
12 pints. Fine for sandwich filling. J. P. B. 

CHUTNEY SAUCE. 

Seven pounds fresh tomatoes, 4 ounces ground ginger, V* 
ounce cayenne pepper, 2 ounces garlic, 4 pounds best raisins, 3 
pounds white granulated sugar, 2 quarts French white wine 
vinegar, 3 tablespoons salt. (1 ounce 1 tablespoon. % ounce 1 
teaspoon.) Clean and skin tomatoes. Stew them in 1 quart of 
vinegar. Add raisins, chopped fine; sugar and garlic. Mix gin- 
ger, pepper and salt in remainder of the vinegar, before adding 
to other ingredients. Boil all together on slow fire for % hour. 
Let stand in big bowl for 3 days, stirring often. Then put in 
jars. This makes about 24 ordinary glasses. Mrs. K. 

MOTHER'S TOMATO CHOW CHOW. 

Chop fine 1 peck green tomatoes, ^4 peck onions and 1 
dozen large bell peppers; salt; mix well and drain over night. 
In morning scald in weak vinegar; pour off; place mixture in 
the second vinegar as strong as desired and cook slowly until 
tender. While cooking add % pound sugar, 1 handful white 
mustard, 1 handful horseradish, 1 tablespoon celery seed, a few 
red peppers, stick cinnamon, and a few whole cloves and all- 
spice. Mrs. E. J. McK. 

MOTHER'S TOMATO CATSUP. 

One peck ripe tomatoes, 1 ounce salt, 1 ounce mace, 1 scant 
tablespoon black pepper, 1 teaspoon cayenne, 1 tablespoon 
ground cloves, 2 tablespoons mustard, ground; 1 tablespoon 
celery seed tied in a bag. Cut a slit in the tomatoes, put in 
porcelain kettle, and boil until all juice is extracted and pulp 
dissolved. Strain and press through colander, then a hair sieve. 
Return to fire, add seasoning and boil at least 5 hours, stirring 
constantly last half hour. Let it stand 12 hours in a stone jar 
in a cool place. When cold add pint strong vinegar. Take out 



CONSER\ 7 ES, JAMS, ETC. 69 

bag of celery seed and bottle, sealing the corks. Keep in a dark 
cool place. Mrs. E. J. McK. 

SLICED FIGS. 

Three-quarters pound sugar to 1 pound fruit; stand over 
night. One teaspoon whole cloves, 2 teaspoons whole allspice; 
add little water, cook slowly over slow fire abou-t 2 hours or 
more. Mrs. E. J. McK. 

CHOW CHOW. 

One peck sliced green tomatoes, 1% dozen cucumbers sliced 
and salted over night with the tomatoes. Onion to suit your 
taste; 1% dozen green peppers, opened and seeds removed and 
soaked in cold water over night. 

CHILI SAUCE. 

Thirty-five ripe tomatoes, 4 red peppers, 4 green peppers, 10 
onions, 2 tart apples, 5 cups vinegar, 5 tablespoons salt, 1 head 
garlic, 1 tablespoon ground cloves, 1 tablespoon of cinnamon, 1 
teaspoon of cayenne pepper. Chop onions, peppers, apples, 
and garlic very fine. Cook the tomatoes without peeling; strain 
through a colander then stew all together 3 hours. When near- 
ly done add 3 cups of brown sugar. E. M. F. 

CUCUMBER CATSUP. 

One dozen ripe yellow cucumbers, 1 dozen green peppers, 1 
dozen large white onions. Remove seeds from cucumbers and 
peppers and cut them all in small dice. Add a handful of salt 
and put mixture in a cheese cloth bag to drain for 12. hours. 
When thoroughly drained add % pint each of celery and mus- 
tard seed, pack in stone jars and cover with good cider vinegar 
well mixed through the mass; cover tightly and set away for 
6 weeks to mature. Spread upon cold meats or eaten as a 
pickle this catsup is delicious. N. B. E. 

MINT JELLY (for cold lamb). 

Half box Knox Sparkling Gelatine, % cup cold water, 2 
bunches mint, 2 1 / cups boiling water, 1 cup sugar, juice of 2 
lemons. Soak the gelatin 5 minutes in the cold water; wash 
and dry the mint and let it stand in the boiling water % hour 
on the back of the range. Add the sugar to the gelatine and 
pour the water from the mint over the whole; let dissolve, then 
strain and when cool add the lemon juice and pour into a mold. 
K. G. 

MASSACHUSETTS CATSUP. 

Six onions, 6 red peppers, chopped fine; 48 ripe tomatoes, 



70 CONSERVES, JAMS, ETC. 

peeled; 6 tablespoons salt, 6 tablespoons brown sugar, 6 cups 
vinegar, cinnamon, cloves, ginger and nutmeg to taste. L. K. 

PRETTY PICKLES. 

One quart raw cabbage chopped fine; 1 quart boiled beets, 
chopped fine; 2 cups of sugar, 1 tablespoon salt, 1 teaspoon 
salt, 1 teaspoon black pepper, J /4 teaspoon red pepper, 1 teacup 
grated horseradish. Cover with cold vinegar, and keep from 
the air. Mrs. H. B. 

GREEN MUSKMELON PICKLE. 

Peel and take out all pulp of melons until you have eight 
pounds of fruit; take 1 quart of vinegar and 4 pounds of sugar 
and boil well, then put in the fruit and boil until tender; take 
the fruit out and boil syrup until thick; then put fruit back and 
heat thoroughly; add spices with fruit before heating second 
time. (Do not cook spices very much.) Put in bottles. Mrs. 
F. C. 

SWEET PICKLE CHERRIES. 

Half pound sugar, Vz pint vinegar, bag of spices to 1 pound 
of pitted cherries; put cherries in crock; boil syrup, pour over 
hot, pour off, reheat and pour over every other day, nine times. 
Mrs. R. P. B. 

PEPPERS. 

Take the small yellow button peppers with a few that have 
turned red, leaving the little stems on, and place closely in glass 
jars. Pour over them hot vinegar that has been boiled with a 
little salt; seal; serve with meats. S. D. 

CURRY RECIPE FROM INDIA. 

One ounce Jamaica ginger, 1 ounce cayenne pepper, 1 ounce 
turmeric, 1 ounce cumin, 1 ounce coriander seed, 1 ounce mace, 
1 ounce cardemon. Pulverize and mix thoroughly. Keep in 
bottle tightly corked. 

MRS. FOY'S APPETIZER. 

For 6 people take 3 grape fruit, 4 big oranges, juice of 1 
lemon, (to suit own taste), % cup sugar, 3 tablespoons chopped 
mint. Take off skin and cut fruit in small pieces; then mix 
thoroughly about 1 hour before dinner. Just before serving 
add chopped mint and either cherry or strawberry for looks. 
Mrs. J. M. F. 



CONSERVES, JAMS, ETC. 71 

ADDITIONAL RECIPES 



Bread 



Always save your bread crusts. Dry them thoroughly, put 
them through the meat chopper, and sift the crumbs first 
through a wire basket, then through a sieve. This will give 
you 3 grades. Use the coarsest, moistened with milk, for stuff- 
ing fish or poultry; the medium for puddings, etc., and the finest 
for rolling croquette mixtures. They will keep a long time. 
Do not try to use in this way dry biscuit or buttered toast. 

GRAHAM BREAD. 

Three cups graham flour, 1 cup white flour, % cup New 
Orleans molasses, 2 cups sour milk, 1 teaspoon soda, and salt. 
Mrs. J. L. W. 

GRAHAM BREAD WITH NUTS AND RAISINS. 

One cup white flour, 1 cup graham flour, V teaspoon salt, 1 
teaspoon soda, scant; 1 cup sweet or sour milk (sour preferred), 
x /4 cup syrup, 1 tablespoon sugar, % cup raisins, chopped; 1-3 
cup English walnuts, chopped. Bake in one loaf in slow oven. 
M. F. F. C. 

GRAHAM NUT BREAD. 

Three cups sifted graham flour, 1 cup white flour, 2 cup 
sugar, pinch of salt, 1 pint buttermilk or sour milk, 1 tablespoon 
soda dissolved in sour milk, 1 cup raisins, 1 cup walnuts, 1 cup 
syrup. Bake 1 hour in slow oven. M. X. M. 

WALNUT BREAD. 

Three and a half cups flour, 3% teaspoons baking powder, 
scant teaspoon salt, % cup sugar, 1 cup milk, 1 cup walnuts, 1 
egg. Leave in warm place 15 minutes to raise and then bake 
40 minutes in slow oven. M. X. M. 

NUT BREAD. 

Four heaping cups flour, 4 teaspoons baking powder, 1 egg, 
% cup sugar, 2 cups milk, a little salt, and 1 cup of chopped 
walnuts. Let raise % hour and bake about 20 minutes. Mrs. 
E. B. G. 

NUT BREAD. 

Half cup granulated sugar, 3 cups flour, 3 teaspoons baking 
powder, 1 teaspoon salt, 1 egg, 1% cups milk, 1 cup chopped 



BREAD 73 

walnuts. Mix baking powder, flour, nuts and sugar and salt 
together. Beat the egg into the milk and add last. This can be 
sliced very thin for sandwiches. Let stand for 20 minutes in 
a warm place to raise and then bake in slow oven about 1 hour. 
H. W. M. 

NUT BREAD. 

Two eggs, % cup white sugar, 4 cups flour, 4 teaspoons bak- 
ing powder, 1 cup chopped walnuts, salt. Add milk enough to 
make a stiff batter. Put in 2 baking pans, let raise for % hour. 
Bake in slow oven for Vi hour. B. D. P. 

WALNUT BREAD. 

One egg, % cup sugar, 1 cup milk, }4 teaspoon salt, 3 tea- 
spoons baking powder, flour enough for soft dough, 1 cup 
chopped walnuts. Let stand 20 minutes then bake slowly about 
tij minutes. M. C. 

DATE BREAD. 

One cup English walnuts, chopped; 1 cup dates, chopped; 2 
cups sour milk, 1 cup molasses, 2 cups graham flour, 2 cups 
whole wheat flour, 1 teaspoon soda, stirred into sour milk; 1 
teaspoon salt. Stir all together, the batter should be stiff; put 
into 2 medium sized bread pans and bake very slowly 1% hours. 
R. D. 

WHOLE WHEAT RAISIN BREAD. 

This tastes exactly as good as cake, and is much better as 
a steady diet: 3 cups milk, 1 cup water, % teaspoon salt, 1% 
cups raisins, 1 yeast cake, whole wheat flour. Scald the milk, 
add the salt, and, when luke-warm, the dissolved yeast cake; 
stir in flour enough to make a soft dough; beat well, and stand 
in a warm place until very light and spongy. Then add the 
raisins floured and seeded, and enough more flour to make a 
rather stiff dough. Knead, mold into loaves; put into greased 
pans, and let stand again until light. Brush the tops of the 
loaves with milk; bake in a moderate oven 40 minutes. 

BRAN BREAD. 

Two cups Ralston bran, 1 cup wheat flour, 1 cup sweet milk, 

1 teaspoon baking powder, % teaspoon soda dissolved in milk, 

2 tablespoons molasses, salt; bake 1 hour. J. L. W. 

PRUNE BREAD. 

One pint sliced prunes, 2 pints graham flour, M> pint white 
flour, 1 pint sour milk, % pint molasses, 1 tablespoon brown 
sugar, 1 tablespoon cream or other shortening, 1 teaspoon salt, 



74 BREAD 

1 of soda. Soak the prunes until they are soft, slice and flour 
them before measuring. This makes 2 loaves. Bake 45 minutes. 
Mrs. H. N. B. 

GERMAN COFFEE BREAD. 

One cup scalded milk, % cup butter, or butter and lard, V* 
cup sugar, ^ teaspoon salt, 1 egg, % yeast cake dissolved in % 
cup lukewarm milk, % cup raisins stoned and cut in pieces. 
Add butter, sugar, and salt to milk; when lukewarm, add dis- 
solved yeast cake, egg well beaten, flour to make stiff batter, 
and raisins. Cover, and let rise over night; in morning spread 
in buttered dripping pan % inch thick. Cover and let raise 
again. Before baking, brush over with beaten egg, and cover 
with following mixture: Melt 3 tablespoons butter, add y$ cup 
sugar and 1 teaspoon cinnamon. When sugar is partially melt- 
ed, add 3 tablespoons flour. E. W. C. 

SCOTCH BREAD. 

Put % pound of butter and 1 pound of flour in a bowl and 
rub together until thoroughly mixed. Add the unbeaten yolk 
of 1 egg and % pound of sugar and mix and knead like bread 
until it is a smooth stiff dough. Do not add any moistening. 
Sprinkle a little sugar on the moulding board and shape the 
dough into a flat, round cake to fit a pie-pan. Crimp around 
the edges like a pie: cut into sections and prick with a fork. 
Bake for 1 hour or longer in a very slow oven until delicate 
brown and do not break apart until it is perfectly cold. Mrs. 
O. M. M. 

BOSTON BROWN BREAD. 

Two cups corn meal, % cup graham flour, % cup rye meal, 
2 /?, cup molasses, 1 teaspoon soda, 2 teaspoons salt. Wet with 
boiling water, making about the consistency of griddle cakes; 
steam 3 hours. L. C. W. 

STEAMED BROWN BREAD. 

One pint bread crumbs, fine; 1 egg, 1 cup sweet milk, 1 cup 
molasses, salt, 1 full teaspoon soda in molasses, 1 cup raisins. 
Thicken with graham flour and corn meal the thickness of gems. 
Fill 3 1-pound baking powder cans % full; steam 3 hours with 
covers of cans on S. E. D. 

BROWN BREAD. 

One cup Roman meal, 1 cup graham flour, 1 cup entire wheat 
flour, % cup molasses, 1 cup buttermilk, 1 teaspoon soda in % 
cup hot water. A. 



BREAD 75 

BROWN BREAD. 

Two cups Indian meal, 1 cup graham flour, 1 cup white flour, 
1 cup molasses, Vz cup raisins, 1 teaspoon soda, 1 cup or more of 
buttermilk. Salt to taste. Steam 3% hours. A. 

HEAVENLY CORN BREAD. 

One cup corn meal, 1 teaspoon salt, 1 tablespoon butter, \Vz 
cups of boiling water. Let this stand for 6 hours or all night, 
if intended for breakfast. Then add 1 cup of milk, 3 eggs, 
beaten light; 1 tablespoon of sugar, 1 tablespoon of flour, 2 tea- 
spoons baking powder. Bake in hollow pans a half hour. N. 
B. E. 

CORN BREAD. 

(Mix in order of recipe.) 

One egg beaten, 1 pint milk, 1 tablespoon sugar, pinch of salt, 
1 cup corn meal, enough corn meal to make batter, (not too 
stiff) ; 2 tablespoons melted butter, 2 teaspoons baking powder 
in a little flour. Pour into buttered pans and sprinkle sugar 
on top. Bake. S. D. 

CORN BREAD. 

Two cups sour milk, 1 egg well beaten, 1% cups corn meal, 
V-2 cup flour, 1 level teaspoon soda, % tablespoon molasses, 1 
tablespoon melted shortening. Mix and pour in shallow pan 
that has been greased. Bake 20 minutes in good oven. Mrs. E. 
J. McK. 

CORN BREAD. 

One cup Indian meal, 2 eggs, 1 cup milk, 2 teaspoons baking 
powder, 1 cup flour, Vz cup sugar, 2 teaspoons melted butter or 
Crisco, l /2 teaspoon salt. Mix Indian meal and flour and add the 
salt. Beat the eggs light without separating; add the sugar and 
beat until light. Add the milk and butter to the eggs and sugar, 
and the mixed meal and flour to this, beating all the while. 
When light and smooth and ready to bake, add the baking 
powder. Pour into a greased shallow pan and bake 20 minutes 
in a quick oven. H. \V. M. 

PHILADELPHIA CORN BREAD. 

One cup sifted meal, 1 Vz cups sifted flour, 1 cup milk, 1 table- 
spoon melted butter, 2 well-beaten eggs (yolks and whites to- 
gether), V cup sugar, a little salt, 2 teaspoons baking powder. 
Beat eggs, sugar and butter until smooth. Add milk. Then add 
baking powder and salt to the flour and meal, and stir all to- 
gether, beating thoroughly. Bake in moderate oven. E. C. 



76 BREAD 

RICE CORN BREAD. 

One cup yellow corn meal, 1 heaping teaspoon baking powder, 
1 teaspoon salt, 1 tablespoon sugar, 1 cup of cooked rice, small 
piece of butter, 1 egg beaten separately. Mix thoroughly and 
bake 20 minutes. Mrs. F. C. 

CORN SOUFFLE. 

One pint milk, hot; stir in % cup corn meal, % teaspoon salt, 
and cook 5 minutes. Remove from fire; add 1 tablespoon butter, 
and cool. Beat separately 4 eggs. Add first the yolks, and then 
fold in the whites. Place in oven and bake 30 minutes. Serve 
at once. A. S. W. 

OMELET CORN-CAKE. 

Beat 1 egg light with Vz teaspoon of salt. Add 1 tablespoon 
of melted butter, 1 teaspoon of sugar, 1 heaping tablespoon of 
white flour, Vz teaspoon of baking powder, % cup of sweet 
milk and % cup of sour milk. Beat well and stir in enough 
corn meal to make a batter that will pour easily. Add Vz of a 
teaspoon of soda dissolved in a very little warm water. In an- 
other dish, beat 1 egg very light and stir in Vz a cup of sweet 
milk. When the batter is in the pan, ladle the egg and milk 
mixture over the top of it carefully. Do not stir it in. Slide 
the pan into the oven and bake for 35 or 40 minutes, or until 
it has a rich brown crust. If properly made there will be a 
layer of omelet half way in the loaf. Mrs. C. M. M. 

CORN BREAD. 

One pint sour milk with 1 level teaspoon soda in it, 2 cups 
yellow corn meal, 1 cup white flour, 1 tablespoon melted butter, 

1 tablespoon melted lard, 2 tablespoons sugar, 1 teaspoon salt, 

2 eggs. If sweet milk is used, then add 2 teaspoons of baking 
powder to the flour. This corn bread is much better, made out 
of sour milk. Mrs. F. F. C. 

PARKER HOUSE ROLLS. 

One quart sifted Hour, 1 teaspoon salt, % pint milk, 2 table- 
spoons butter, 2 tablespoons sugar, 1 yeast cake (compressed). 
Let the milk come to a boil; when cold, stir in flour with a 
spoon, it will just take up the milk; put in sugar, yeast and 
butter; set to raise. When light make into a loaf with as little 
flour as possible. Let it raise about 1 hour, then roll out as 
thick as for cookies. Cut with a cooky cutter; put a little 
butter in the middle and fold together; put in tin; let raise; bake 
in a quick oven about 30 minutes. This makes about 3 dozen. 



BREAD 77 

POP-OVERS. 

One cup flour, % teaspoon salt, 1 cup milk, 2 eggs, % teaspoon 
melted butter. Mix salt and flour; add milk gradually, in order 
to obtain a smooth batter. Add egg, beaten until light, and but- 
ter; beat two minutes, using Doan egg beater; turn into hissing 
hot buttered iron gem pans, and bake 30 to 35 minutes in a hot 
oven. Mrs. G. S. W. 

FINE MUFFINS. 

Two eggs beaten separately, 1 tablespoon sugar, IVz cups 
flour, 1 cup sour milk, % teaspoon soda, 1 tablespoon melted 
butter, 1 teaspoon baking powder. Bake in well buttered muffin 
tins about 20 minutes. I. P. B. 

QUEEN OF MUFFINS. 

One-quarter cup butter, % cup sugar, 1 egg, % cup milk 
(scant), 1% cups flour, 2% teaspoons baking powder. Cream 
the butter; add sugar and egg well beaten; sift baking powder 
with flour, and add to the first mixture, alternating with milk. 
Bake in buttered tin gem pans 20 minutes. Mrs. G. S. W. 

CORN MUFFINS. 

One cup corn meal, 1 full cup of milk, 2 cups flour, 2 eggs, 
2 teaspoons baking powder, butter size of egg, % cup sugar, 
a little salt. Mrs. C. P. H. 

SWEET MUFFINS. 

One and three-quarters cups flour, % teaspoon salt, 4 tea- 
spoons baking powder; cream 4 tablespoons butter and 4 table- 
spoons sugar; add 1 egg, well beaten; then add alternately 1 
cup sweet milk and the dry ingredients (flour) ; bake in hot, 
well buttered muffin tins. M. X. M. 

GRAHAM MUFFINS. 

One cup graham or entire wheat flour, 1 cup flour, % cup 
sugar, 1 teaspoon salt, 1 cup milk, 1 egg, 1 tablespoon melted 
butter, 4 teaspoons baking powder. Mix and sift dry ingredi- 
ents; add milk, gradually; egg well beaten, and melted butter; 
bake in hot oven in buttered gem pans 25 minutes. Mrs. G. S. 
W. 

BRAN MUFFINS. 

Two cups Ralston bran, 1 cup flour, 1 teaspoon salt, \Vz cups 
sour milk, 1 teaspoon soda, 2 tablespoons molasses, % cup melt- 
ed butter. This makes 12 muffins. Mrs. C. P. H. 



78 BREAD 

RYE MUFFINS. 

Two cups of rye, 1 cup of flour, 1 cup of sugar, 1 egg, 1 tea- 
spoon of soda, and a little salt; mix rather stiff with sour milk. 
Mrs. H. N. B. 

QUICK BREAKFAST PUFFS. 

Two eggs, 1 cup milk, 1 tablespoon melted butter, 1% cups 
flour, 2 teaspoons baking powder, % teaspoon salt. Beat eggs; 
add' milk and butter; sift flour, salt and baking powder; add and 
beat 2 minutes. Pour into hot, well greased muffin pans and 
bake 20 minutes in hot oven. S. E. D. 

! HUCKLEBERRY GEMS. 

Three-quarters cup sugar, butter size of walnut, 2 small 
cups flour, 1 egg, beaten light; 2 teaspoons baking powder, 1 
jelly glass full of berries dredged with flour; water sufficient to 
thin batter. Bake quickly. M. D. B. 

BRAN GEMS. 

One level cup flour, 1 level teaspoon soda, Vz teaspoon salt, 2 
level cups bran, Vz cup molasses, 1% cups milk, 1 egg. Sift 
flour, soda and salt, then add bran, molasses, milk and the egg, 
well beaten. The egg may be omitted though the gems are 
better with it. Beat all together and bake in hissing hot gem 
pans. R. C. C. 

FRUIT ROLLS. 

Two cups flour, 4 teaspoons baking powder, % teaspoon salt, 
2 tablespoons sugar, 2 tablespoons butter, 2 /$ cup milk, % cup 
raisins and 2 tablespoons citron, a few nuts, raisins, citron and 
nuts chopped fine. Mix dough as for biscuits; roll out %-inch 
thick. Brush with melted butter and sprinkle with fruit, sugar 
and cinnamon. Roll up and cut. Place on buttered tin and 
bake in hot oven 15 minutes. M. X. M. 

CORNMEAL ROLLS. 

One and one-quarter cups flour, % cup cornmeal, 1% level 
teaspoons baking powder, 1 level tablespoon sugar, 1 level tea- 
spoon salt, 2 level tablespoons butter, 1 egg, % cup milk. Sift 
the dry ingredients together and cut in the butter. Beat the 
egg and add with the milk, using enough milk to make a soft 
dough. Knead lightly, roll out and cut with a biscuit cutter. 
Butter % of each roll, fold and press edges together. Bake 20 
minutes in a quick oven. 

SOUTHERN BATTER BREAD. 

Three eggs, 2 level cups corn meal, 1 level teaspoon salt, 2 
level teaspoons baking powder, milk. Beat the eggs; add the meal 



BREAD 79 

sifted with salt and baking powder, and stir in enough milk 
or milk and water to make a thin batter. Pour into a hissing hot 
pan in which 1 level tablespoon of shortening has been melted. 
Bake in a hot oven. B. 

SOUTHERN BEATEN BISCUIT. 

One quart flour, 1 teaspoon salt, 1 pint of milk or water, or 
V-2 pint of each; 2 tablespoons lard. When the flour and salt have 
been sifted together rub in the lard until thoroughly incorpor- 
ated. Mix these with the liquid, having the dough rather stiff. 
Turn it onto a lightly floured board, and beat with a rolling-pin 
until the dough becomes perfectly smooth and small bubbles or 
blisters form. Roll thinly, cut into biscuits and prick with a 
fork. Bake in a moderate oven until the biscuits are a delicate 
brown color. This will take about 15 minutes. The edges of 
the biscuit should crack slightly during the baking and the cen- 
ters should be very fine grained and pure white in color. M. 

SOUTHERN RICE BREAD. 

Beat 1 egg, without separating, until light; add 1 cup of 
milk, Vi teaspoon of salt, 1 cup of cornmeal, and 1 cup of cold 
boiled rice; beat thoroughly; then add % cup of flour sifted with 
3 level teaspoons of baking powder, beat, stir in 4 extra table- 
spoons of milk, turn at once into greased layer-cake pans, and 
bake in a hot oven 30 minutes. Turn out 1 cake, spread it with 
butter, put another on top, spread it with butter, put the third 
on top, dust with powdered sugar, and send to the table. 

BAKING POWDER BISCUIT. 

One quart flour, sifted with 4 teaspoons baking powder, % 
teaspoon salt. Mix with 2 />, milk, y>, water as soft as can be 
handled. Do not knead, but pat with hands. Cut with small 
cutter. Melt 1 tablespoon butter and 1 of lard and with pastry 
brush put on top and bottom. Do not use either butter or lard 
in mixture. Do not use cheap baking powder. A. L. B. 



go BREAD 

ADDITIONAL RECIPES 



Waffles and Pan Cakes 

QUICK WAFFLES That Never Fail. 

Three eggs, 2 tablespoons baking powder, 1 quart flour, 2 
tablespoons melted butter, 1 pint sweet milk, % teaspoon salt. 
Pour in hot, well greased waffle irons. Sour milk and 1 tea- 
spoon soda may be substituted for sweet milk, but they are not 
quite as crisp. I. P. B. 

HOT SYRUP TO SERVE WITH WAFFLES. 

One and a half cups granulated sugar, 1 teaspoon of molas- 
ses; boil with 1-2 cup water till thick. Also use if liked, pow- 
dered sugar and cinnamon, sifted together, "Southern style."- 
I. P. B. 

RICE WAFFLES. 

Three-quarters cup cooked rice, 1 tablespoon butter, 1 table- 
spoon molasses, 4 eggs, 1 pint milk, 1 tablespoon baking powder. 
As little flour as possible to make batter. A. 

DATE WAFFLES. 

One and a half cups flour, 1 teaspoon baking powder, Vz tea- 
spoon salt, 1 tablespoon sugar, 2 tablespoons butter, 1 cup milk, 
1 cup dates, 2 eggs. After sifting together the flour, salt and 
baking powder, add the sugar, then the dates, stoned, floured 
and chopped; melt the butter and add it, together with the yolks 
of the eggs and the milk. Beat the whites of eggs to a stiff 
froth and stir these into the batter at the last moment. Bake in 
a hot, greased waffle-iron and as soon as each waffle is done, 
spread with butter, then sprinkle with powdered sugar to which 
may be added a little grated lemon rind. If preferred, serve 
the waffles with maple or other syrup. Z. 

BUCKWHEAT CAKES. 

One pint buttermilk, 1 pint water, % cup yeast. Stir into a 
batter with buckwheat flour and let rise over night. In the 
morning add % teaspoon soda dissolved in a little water; bake 
on a hot griddle and serve with maple syrup. 

BREADCRUMB GRIDDLE CAKES. 

Two slices stale bread. 2 cups milk, 2 eggs, 2 level tablespoons 
melted butter, 1 level cup sifted flour, % level teaspoon salt, 2 



82 WAFFLES AND PAN CAKES 

level teaspoons baking powder, 1 level tablespoon sugar. 
Crumble the bread, add hot milk and let stand to soften the 
crumbs. When cold add the eggs well beaten, butter, and flour, 
sifted with the remaining ingredients. Beat all together and 
cook on a hissing hot griddle. Remember in buttering the 
griddle to do it as lightly as you would a cake tin. R. C. C. 

SOUR MILK GRIDDLE CAKES. 

Make a batter of a quart of sour milk and as much sifted 
flour as is needed to thicken, so it runs from the dish. Add 2 
well beaten eggs, 1 teaspoon of salt, 1 tablespoon of melted but- 
ter; add a level teaspoon of sola dissolved in a little milk; bake 
on a hot, well greased, griddle. 



WAFFLES AND PAN CAKES 83 

ADDITIONAL RECIPES 



Sandwiches 

SANDWICH COMBINATIONS. 

Dried fruits chopped fine and moistened with orange juice. 

Dates, figs and nuts chopped fine. 

Dates, figs, and jelly. 

Yolks of hard-boiled eggs mashed to a paste and melted 
butter added with salt and cayenne, and, in the summer, a few 
chopped nasturtiums. 

Chopped chicken and celery. 

Lamb and mutton and mint leaves and catsup. 

Peas and mayonnaise. 

Tomato jelly and mayonnaise. 

Sliced quinces and guava jelly. 

Chopped nuts of all kinds, mixed with a little melted butter. 

HAM SANDWICH BISCUIT. 

Three cups flour, 2 teaspoons baking powder, V* teaspoon 
salt, 3 tablespoons butter or lard, % cup finely minced ham, 1 cup 
milk. Rub 2 tablespoons of the fat into the flour, salt and bak- 
ing powder, which have been sifted together. Mix to a dough 
with the milk. Roll out rather thinly. Cut into rounds, and 
spread % of these with the ham which has been moistened with 
the remaining tablespoon of butter melted. Cover the ham in 
turn with another portion of dough; press the sandwich thus 
formed lightly together and bake in a hot oven. A. L. B. 

MOSAIC SANDWICH. 

Cut 3 slices each of white and dark graham bread. Spread 
a slice of white bread with creamed butter and place a slice of 
graham bread on it. Now spread graham with creamed butter 
and place on a slice of white. Repeat this process, beginning 
with graham. Put both piles in a cool place with a light weight 
on them. When the butter has become hardened, trim each pile 
even, cut each pile in 3 %-inch slices. Spread with creamed 
butter and put together so that a white block will alternate with 
a graham one. Put under weight in a cool place and when but- 
ter is hardened cut in thin slices. 

LOBSTER SANDWICHES. 

Chop fine the meat of the lobster; season with tabasco 



SANDWICHES 85 

sauce, lemon juice and oil spread upon lightly buttered bread. 

w. c. c. 

CHEESE SANDWICHES. 

Take 10 cents' worth of Eastern cream cheese (very dry), 
grate fine; take 1 cup of milk and let get hot and put in the 
cheese; add 3 eggs well beaten; then add seasoning of salt, red 
pepper and white mustard; set aside to cool. When sandwiches 
are wanted spread between bread and toast in oven. Mrs. F. C. 

CHEESE SANDWICH. 

Rub to a paste 44 pound of soft American cheese, adding 
gradually 44 cup of thick cream. Season with 44 teaspoon of 
salt, a saltspoon of white pepper, a dash of red pepper, and 
Vz teaspoon of Worcestershire sauce. Mix and spread on thin 
slices of unbuttered bread. 

STRAWBERRY SANDWICHES. 

Half cup of strawberries, 3 tablespoons pulverized sugar, 1 
tablespoon butter, 46 teaspoon vanilla. Work butter to a cream. 
Add sugar, beating well. Add strawberries last and beat smooth. 
B. 

CORONA SANDWICH. 

Use rye bread; mash smooth a Petaluma cheese; stir into 
it contents of a 10 cent bottle of stuffed olives chopped fine. 
Season with cayenne and moisten with cream until consistency 
to spread. C. C. C. B. 

CHEESE AND HORSERADISH SANDWICH. 

Mix 2 cream cheeses with a fork and moisten with 1 pint 
cream, whipped; add 3 tablespoons horseradish, freed as much 
as possible from the liquor; a dash of cayenne, and spread be- 
tween white bread cut very thin. C. C. 

SANDWICH PASTE. 

Fifteen cents' worth of boiled ham, 1 hard boiled egg, 1 
German pickle, 1 bottle stuffed olives, 3 green onions, % 
Heinze's mustard, dash red pepper; chop very fine. 



86 SANDWICHES 

ADDITIONAL RECIPES 



WHEN 

1 YOU WANT QUALITY 

IN 

GROCERIES 



Home-Made Cakes 

Delicacies 
Home-Made Bread 

Fresh Fruit 



S. J. Sill Company 

SHATTUCK AT ALLSTON 



cS^tof AU Spts. rnone eerie. 5204 
I 

hWsw 



Pies and Pastry 



Some one has said that there is nothing an American house- 
keeper can't make into a pie and when you look over the list 
of articles she has used in this way you will believe the state- 
ment. 

PIE CRUST. 

One coffee cup of flour, 1 scant teaspoon salt sifted. To this 
rub in lightly with fingers 1 large tablespoon lard. After 
thoroughly mixed, add 3 tablespoons cold water, and handle as 
little as possible. Mrs. W. S. 

PIE CRUST. 

Three cups flour, 1 cup best lard; rub together with fingers 
until flour is all absorbed; add % cup water in which is dis- 
solved 1 tablespoon salt; add % cup more flour; do not handle 
more than necessary. Better when several days old. A. F. S. 

FAMILY PIE CRUST. 

One and a half cups flour before sifting, scant % cup cot- 
tolene, pinch of baking powder, pinch of salt, 3 tablespoons 
cold water. L. K. 

MERINGUE FOR LEMON PIE. 

Whites of 2 eggs, beaten well, and add what gelatine will 
stay on the point of a case knife; 2 tablespoons sugar and spread 
on pie when nearly done, and brown slowly. Will not fall. 
C. A. S. 

ENGLISH PUFF PASTE. 

To 1 cup of sifted flour add salt to taste and nearly half a 
cup of w r ater. Mix with a spoon until the dough leaves the bowl. 
Roll out thin and spread all over with lard, then sift flour over 
the lard. Fold twice, roll out, spread with lard, sift with flour. 
Do this 3 times. This will make 3 pie crusts, or can be made 
into pattie crusts and filled with creamed oysters, mushrooms, 
chicken or jelly. 

LEMON PIE. 

Two cups sugar, 1 cup butter, 3 cups hot water, yolks 4 eggs, 
and white of 1 egg, juice and rind grated of 3 lemons, 2 heaping 
tablespoons corn starch. When baked, heat remaining 3 whites 



PIES AND PASTRY. 89 

of eggs with 1 tablespoon sugar and spread on top. Set in the 
oven until browned. Makes 2 big pies or 3 small ones. S. D. 

LEMON PIE. 

Filling for lemon pie: Vz cup sugar, yolks of 3 eggs, juice 
of one lemon (if lemons are small use l 1 /^), butter size of a wal- 
nut, V-2 cup cream, pinch of salt, 2 rounded tablespoons of flour, 
rubbed smooth with a little water. Put in double boiler and 
let boil until thick. Beat into this mixture the well beaten 
white of 1 egg. Bake crust first and fill with the above mix- 
ture. Cover with well beaten whites of 2 eggs and 2 level tea- 
spoons sugar. Set in oven and let brown. M. S. 

ORANGE PIE. 

One cup sugar creamed with 2 tablespoons butter. Beat 5 
eggs light and add slowlv to butter and eggs, then add juice of 2 
oranges and grated rind of 1 orange; then add % pint of 
whipped cream. Bake in moderate oven. Mrs. W. S. 

SOUR CREAM PIE. 

One cup of sour cream, 1 cup chopped raisins, 1 cup sugar, 
yolks of 4 eggs, Vz teaspoon ground cloves. Line pie plate with 
pastry, fill with mixture and bake. Cover with meringue made 
of the 4 whites of eggs. Mrs. T. B. R. 

BANANA PIE. 

Three bananas sliced, little sugar, 1 tablespoon cream, 10 
cents whipped cream. L. K. 

DATE PIE. 

Two cups stoned dates, 1 lemon, flour, 3 tablespoons sugar, 
2 tablespoons milk, butter. Stone the dates, cut them into bits, 
and put with them the juice and the grated rind of a lemon, 
the sugar and milk just enough to soften the dates. Fill a 
lower crust with this, sprinkle very lightly with flour, put bits 
of butter here and there, lay on an upper crust and bake. B. 

MOCK CHERRY PIE. 

(Made With Cranberries.) 

One tablespoon cornstarch with % of a cup of cold water; 
add to 1 cup of boiling water, and let boil five minutes. Cut 2 
cups of cranberries in halves crosswise; cover with cold water, 
and let stand 1 hour (when all the seeds will be drawn out), 
then remove from the water. Add the cranberries, % cupful of 
raisins seeded and chopped, 1 cup sugar. B. C. C. 



90 PIES AND PASTRY. 

SWEET POTATO PIE. 

Two and a half pints of well cooked potatoes, mashed; 2 
pints sugar, 4 eggs, whites and yolks beaten separately; 1 pint 
sweet milk, lump of good butter, cinnamon to taste, and a little 
ginger. 

BUTTER-SCOTCH PIE. 

Two cups brown sugar, 2 tablespoons butter, 2 cups milk, 3 
eggs, 2 tablespoons flour, 1 tablespoon vanilla, 1 tablespoon 
powdered sugar. Cream the brown sugar with the butter. Add 
to them the yolks of the eggs beaten very light, and the flour 
rubbed smooth with a little milk. Put to this enough milk to 
make 2 full cups. Heat the milk, sugar and butter together 
with the flour, stirring constantly in a double boiler until the 
mixture is smooth; then whip in the egg yolks. When the 
whole thickens, take from the fire, flavor with the vanilla, turn 
into a crust which has been previously baked, cover with a 
meringue of the whites of the eggs beaten stiff with the pow- 
dered sugar, and brown lightly in the oven. Z. 

JELLY PIE. 

Three tablespoons jelly (acid jelly is best), yolks 3 eggs, 1 
tablespoon butter, 3 tablespoons sugar. Mix well. Put into 
lined pie pan. When cooked to a jelly, take out of oven and 
spread with meringue of 3 egg whites and brown. For 1 pie. 
B. C. C. 

PUMPKIN PIE 3 Pies. 

Two heaping cups sifted pumpkin, 1 quart rich milk, 4 eggs, 
3 teacups sugar, 1 tablespoon each of ginger, cinnamon and salt. 
Then place in oven and put little pieces of butter on top. L. K. 

PUMPKIN PIE. 

One pint strained pumpkin, 1 pint milk (half cream is bet- 
ter), 6 eggs, 1 cup brown sugar, 2 tablespoons brandy, % tea- 
spoon cinnamon, pinch of ginger, 3 tablespoons melted butter. 
Bake in slow oven. Mrs. M. S. 

RAISIN PIE Delicious. 

Two cups seeded raisins chopped fine. Put on stove with a 
small amount of water and cook slowly until tender. 1 cup 
sour cream, yolks of 3 eggs, 1 cup sugar, pinch of salt, pinch of 
cloves, % teaspoon of cinnamon, ginger, and nutmeg. Add 
raisins. Bake with one crust. Use whites of eggs for meringue, 
or whipped cream may be substituted. A. 



PIES AND PASTRY. 91 

BANBURY TURNOVERS. 

One cup of raisins, 1 cracker, 1 cup sugar, 1 lemon and 
grated rind, 1 egg. Stone and cut raisins into small pieces; add 
sugar, egg lightly beaten, cracker finely rolled and lemon juice. 
Roll a pastry %-inch thick and cut into 4-inch squares. Place 
2 teaspoons mixture on each piece, moisten edges with cold 
water. Fold into triangular shapes and press together. Bake 
20 minutes in slow oven. H. S. 

CHEESE CAKE. 

One slice butter %-inch thick, 1 full cup of flour, 3 table- 
spoons of sugar. Mix like pie dough and moisten with 1 beaten 
egg, Roll and fix in a spring-form pan or any deep cake tin. 
Mrs. F. F. C. 

FILLING FOR CHEESE CAKE. 

Fifteen cents Dutch (or cottage) cheese, 1 cup of sugar, 
yolks of 3 eggs, grated rind and juice of 1 large lemon, 2 table- 
spoons flour (level), 1 good slice of butter, melted; add the 
beaten whites (stiff) of the eggs last thing. Then sprinkle % 
cup of chopped English walnuts over the top before placing in 
the oven. Bake % of an hour slowly. Mrs. F. F. C. 

APRICOT SHORTCAKE. 

When strawberries are out of season a delicious shortcake 
can be made by using canned apricots between layers of the 
usual "biscuit dough." Serve with the following dressing: % 
cup maple syrup, 1 tablespoon butter. Boil until it spins a 
thread. Pour gradually into the stiffly beaten whites of 2 eggs. 
When cool add % cup whipped cream. Flavor with few drops 
vanilla. 

VEGETARIAN MINCE PIE. 

Mix 1 pound of seeded raisins, 1 pound of currants, % 
pound of candied cherries, % pound of citron and orange peel, 
shredded, Vi pound of blanched almonds, chopped fine; a level 
teaspoon of cinnamon, 4 tablespoons of sugar, the grated rind 
of 1, and juice of 2, oranges; 1 cupful of dry cracker crumbs, 
and a level teaspoon of salt; add sufficient grape juice to moist- 
en. If you are not going to use this at once, do not add the 
cracker crumbs until baking time. A. L. B. 

FRUIT MINCEMEAT. 

One cup chopped apples, 1 cup brown sugar, 1 cup seeded 
raisins, 1 cup bread crumbs in 1 cup sweet cider, 2 rounding 



92 PIES AND PASTRY. 

tablespoons butter, 1 beaten egg, 1 teaspoon each cinnamon and 
mace, 1 cup cleansed currants, 1 cup chopped walnut meats. 
Mix all together and add hot water to moisten as ordinary 
mincemeat. Bake in 2 crusts. M. E. S. 

MINCE MEAT Extra Fine. 

One pound raisins, 1 pound currants, 1 pound beef suet, Va 
pound candied orange and citron mixed, 1 pound sugar, 3 
pounds apples, 1% teaspoons mixed spices, 1 tablespoon salt, 1 
cup boiled cider, 1 cup nut meats chopped fine, grated rind of 
2 lemons. C. A. S. 

MINCE MEAT. 

5 pounds of meat, 5 pounds of raisins, 5 pounds of currants, 
5 pounds of apples, 2^ pounds suet, 1 pound Brazil nuts and 
walnuts, V-2 pound lemon and orange peel, 2 pounds brown 
sugar, 2 quarts sweet cider, 1 quart boiled cider, 2 teaspoons of 
cinnamon, cloves, allspice and nutmeg. Cook meat in water 
enough to cover. When tender let remain in water until cool. 
Chop fine. Mix all dry ingredients then all liquids. Mrs. W. S. 

TO GLAZE PASTRY. 

Break an egg, separate the yolk from the white. Beat yolk 
for a short time. When pastry is nearly baked, take it out of 
oven, brush it' over with the beaten yolk, then put back in oven 
to set glaze. 



PIES AND PASTRY. 93 

ADDITIONAL RECIPES 



Puddings and Other Desserts. 

RAISIN PUFFS. 

Two cups flour, 3 teaspoons baking powder, 1 cup water, 2 
tablespoons sugar, 1 cup chopped raisins, 2 tablespoons melted 
butter, 2 eggs, % teaspoon cinnamon, a little cloves and nut- 
meg. Steam 'Vz hour in buttered cups or 1 hour in mold. 

Dressing. 2 cups water, % cup sugar, 1 tablespoon butter, 
a little nutmeg; boil and thicken with a little flour. Mrs. E. B. 
G. 

CARROT PUDDING With Butter. 

Grate 1 cup of raw potato, add 1 level teaspoon soda, 1 cup 
grated raw carrot, 1 cup flour, 1 cup brown sugar, % cup each 
of floured raisins and currants, Vz cup melted butter, Vz cup 
citron, y 2 teaspoon cinnamon, % teaspoon cloves, V% teaspoon 
nutmeg. Steam in mold for 3 hours. E. H. W. 

CARROT PUDDING With Suet. 

One cup grated raw carrots, 1 cup grated raw potato, 2 cups 
flour thoroughly mixed with 1 teaspoon soda, 1 cup chopped 
suet, 1 full cup brown sugar, 1 scant cup raisins, 1 teaspoon 
cinnamon, % teaspoon cloves, % teaspoon nutmeg, y 2 cup 
citron. Steam in closed mold 3 hours. Serve with whipped 
cream or foam sauce. E. H. W. 

FRUIT PUDDING. 

Three eggs, % cup molasses (dark), 3 large apples, chopped 
fine; 1 cup flour, 1 cup bread crumbs, teaspoon soda, 1 cup 
raisins. Steam 2 hours. Any good sauce. M. D. B. 

BLACK PUDDING. 

Three cups flour, 1 cup molasses, 1 cup milk, 1 cup raisins, 
butter size of an egg, 2 eggs, 1 teaspoon soda, 1 teaspoon cinna- 
mon, % teaspoon cloves, % teaspoon ginger. Steam 3 hours. 
Serve with any good pudding sauce. S. B. J. 

STEAMED PUDDING. 

Half cup melted butter (scant), 2 /s cup sugar, Vz cup walnuts 
cut fine, y 2 cup raisins, 1 cup flour, 2 cups milk, 1 egg, % tea- 



PUDDINGS AND OTHER DESSERTS 95 

spoon cinnamon, Vz teaspoon nutmeg, 1 teaspoon salt, 2 tea- 
spoons baking powder. Steam 3 hours, and serve with any 
kind of sauce or whipped cream. M. E. S. 

PLUM PUDDING English. 

One pound raisins, 1 pound currants, 1 pound suet, 1 pound 
flour, 1 pound bread crumbs grated, 1 pound potatoes, 1 pound 
figs, 1 teaspoon soda, Vz pound nuts, 1 cup molasses, Vz cup 
orange, lemon, citron peel; 3 teaspoons nutmeg, 1 teaspoon each 
of spices, 3 eggs. Cook 8 hours, by steaming in pudding molds. 
C. L. S. 

ENGLISH PLUM PUDDING. 

One pint bread crumbs, 1 cup brown sugar, 1 cup syrup, 1 
cup milk, 1 cup raisins, 1 cup currants, Vz cup citron, Vz cup of 
brandy, 3 tablespoons suet, 4 tablespoons flour, 4 eggs, 1 table- 
spoon each cinnamon, mace, nutmeg; Vz teaspoon cloves and 
allspice. Steam 4 hours. Serve with hard sauce. Mrs. R. P. B. 

THANKSGIVING PUDDING. 

Chop 1 cup of raisins and mix with 1 cup of flour. Add 1 
cup of brown sugar, 1 cup of chopped suet, Vz teaspoon each 
of cinnamon, allspice and cloves; the juice and grated rind of 
1 lemon, a little finely cut citron and salt to taste. Mix all to- 
gether and add 1 cup of grated raw carrot and 1 cup of grated 
raw potato, with a teaspoon of soda dissolved in the latter. 
Stir well and steam or boil in a mold for 3 hours. 

Sauce Cream together a large tablespoon of butter and a 
cupful of pulverized sugar. Beat in the yolk of an egg and 
when creamy stir in the beaten white, mixing all together light- 
ly. Sprinkle with nutmeg. Mrs. O. M. M. 

MOCK PLUM PUDDING. 

Four slices of dry bread soaked in cup of water; cup of 
either raisins, prunes or dry figs; spices; 3 eggs lightly beaten, 
cup brown sugar, teaspoon baking powder. Boil in bucket for 
\Vt hours. 

TURKISH WAFERS. 

Chop very fine dates, figs and walnuts. Roll in powdered 
sugar. 

OUR FAVORITE PUDDING. 

Mix 2 cups bread crumbs, Vz cup butter, Vz cup molasses, 1 
egg, 2 A cup raisins, Vz teaspoon soda dissolved in 1 cup sweet 



% PUDDINGS AND OTHER DESSERTS 

milk, % teaspoon cloves, 1 teaspoon cinnamon, a pinch of mace 
and salt, % cup orange peel and citron mixed, 1 cup walnuts. 
Boil unceasingly for 3 or 4 hours in boiling water. Cook in 1 
pound coffee can well greased. Serve with hard sauce. Mrs. 
G. S. W. 

STEAMED FIG PUDDING. 

Ten soda crackers rolled fine, % pound dried figs chopped, 
1 cup beef suet chopped fine, 1 cup brown sugar, 2 eggs, % tea- 
spoon soda, Vz nutmeg, 2 tablespoons brandy. Steam 4 hours. 
M. D. B. 

PRUNE PUDDING. 

One cup chopped raw prunes, 1 cup graham flour, 1 cup 
sweet milk, 2 /z cup molasses or syrup, 2 eggs well beaten, 1 
heaping teaspoon of soda, % teaspoon of cinnamon, cloves, nut- 
meg. Steam 2 hours. 

Sauce. Butter size of egg, 1 cup of sugar, juice of 1 lemon, 
1 egg well beaten, 6 tablespoons boiling water added one at a 
time. Place in hot water until hot and well mixed. Hard sauce 
may be used if preferred. Mrs. C. P. H. 

CHOCOLATE PUDDING. 

One-quarter cup butter, 1 cup sugar, yolks of 2 eggs, % cup 
milk, l^j cups flour, 3 teaspoons baking powder, whites of 2 
eggs, 1% squares Baker's chocolate, % teaspoon salt, % tea- 
spoon vanilla. 

Cream the butter and add % the sugar gradually. Beat 
yolks of eggs until thick and lemon-colored, and add, gradually, 
remaining sugar. Combine mixtures, and add milk alternately 
with flour mixed and sifted with baking powder and salt; then 
add whites of eggs beaten until stiff, melted chocolate and va- 
nilla. Bake in an angel-cake pan; remove from pan; cool; fill 
the center with whipped cream, sweetened and flavored, and 
pour around. 

Chocolate Sauce. Boil 1 cup sugar, */& cup water, and a few 
grains cream of tartar until of the consistency of a thin syrup. 
Melt 1% squares Baker's chocolate and pour on gradually the 
hot syrup. Cool slightly, and flavor with % teaspoon vanilla. 
Mrs. H. T. 

ORANGE PUDDING. 

Juice of 4 oranges, yolks of 4 beaten eggs, % cup sugar, 
whites of 4 eggs beaten stiff, 1 cup of cream whipped stiff. 
Melt 1 tablespoon gelatine in very little hot water and add at 
the last. S. B. J. 



PUDDINGS AND OTHER DESSERTS 97 

PLAIN CUSTARD. 

Scald 2 cups sweet milk in a double boiler; yolks of 4 eggs 
beaten light; add to them 3 tablespoons sugar and 1 tablespoon 
flour. Add this mixture to the milk, cook until it thickens, stirr- 
ing constantly. Flavor with 1 teaspoon vanilla. M. X. M. 

FANCY CUSTARD. 

Prepare custard as given above and put alternate layers of 
custard and pineapple, chopped nuts or cocoanut, until glass is 
% filled. Beat whites of eggs stiff, sweeten and place on top of 
custard. A cherry, chopped nuts or cinnamon or nutmeg may 
be put upon the meringue or whipped cream. M. X. M. 

STEAMED CUSTARD. 

Take a fresh egg and beat it up quite lightly. Mix with it 
V-j cup of milk. If the custard is liked sweet add a little sugar 
and extract, or if with the flavor of salt add a pinch of salt. 
Butter a cup, pour in the mixture and steam in boiling water 
till set. If over-done it will get curdled. F. T. 

GRAPE WHIP. 

Half box gelatin, 1 pint grape juice, % cup cold water, % cup 
sugar (or less if the grape juice is very sweet). Cover the 
gelatin with the cold water and let it soak for % hour. Add 
the sugar and stand the mixture over hot water and stir until 
dissolved. Pour in the grape juice; put aside until partly jellied, 
then beat with an ordinary egg whip until the whole mixture 
is like the white of beaten egg. Turn at once into a mold to 
harden. Orange may be substituted for the grape juice, and 
makes a very delicate dessert. 

COFFEE PUFF. 

One egg beat thoroughly, add 2 /3 cup sugar and beat together; 
1 tablespoon of corn starch mixed with a little milk and add to 
the above. Make 1 strong cup of coffee and put in double boiler. 
When good and hot stir in the above. Let boil until it thickens. 
When cold add % pint of whipped cream; save out enough to 
serve on top. F. N. L. 

PEACH FLUFF. 

Materials Whites of 2 eggs, 1 cup of peach pulp either 
fresh or canned, % cup sugar, 1 tablespoon lemon juice. Beat 



98 PUDDINGS AND OTHER DESSERTS 

eggs until stiff and dry. Add gradually fruit pulp and sugar 
and lemon juice. Beat mixture until stiff. Place on ice until 
ready to serve. Serve with cream or fruit sauce. K. D. G. 

CREAM PUDDING. 

Two and a half cups cream, 1 cup sugar, vanilla to taste. 
Whip cream stiff, add sugar slowly. Dissolve package gelatin in 
V-2 cup water and add to cream. Set on ice or in cool place till 
stiff. 

CORN STARCH PUDDING. 

Three eggs, 1 tablespoon butter, 2 tablespoons cornstarch, 
% cup sugar, 2 cups water, vanilla. 

COFFEE CREAM. 

One pint strong coffee, 1 cup sugar, 2 eggs, 2 tablespoons corn- 
starch. Mix the starch and sugar thoroughly and add to boiling 
coffee. Cook in a double boiler until done, and then pour 
slowly over the beaten eggs. Serve in ten sherbet glasses with 
whipped cream. B. R. P. 

CHOCOLATE BLANC MANGE. 

Half box gelatine, 1 pint cream or rich milk, 1 cup grated 
chocolate, 12 tablespoons of sugar. Boil milk, then stir in 
chocolate. Let come to a boil again, then add sugar and gela- 
tine, and flavor to taste. Put in molds in a cool place. 

PINEAPPLE SNOW. 

One small can grated pineapple, 1 cup water, 4 dessert 
spoons cornstarch, juice of 1 lemon, whites of 4 eggs, sugar to 
taste. 

Add pineapple to water in which the cornstarch has been 
dissolved and boil for 20 minutes. Add juice of 1 lemon and 
sugar to the beaten whites of eggs, and add to the boiled mix- 
ture. Serve cold with cream. B. R. P. 

MARSHMALLOW PUDDING. 

One tablespoon Knox's gelatin, 1 cup warm water. Dissolve; 
then add whites of 2 eggs, not beaten; 1 cup sugar. Beat % 
hour. When thick add % can grated pineapple or any chopped 
fruit or nuts. Pour in wet mold. Serve with cream. L. C. W. 

MARSHMALLOW TRIFLE. 

Cut % pound marshmallows into small pieces and mix with 
% pint stiffly beaten cream flavored with sherry. Serve in 



PUDDINGS AND OTHER DESSERTS 99 

frappe glasses with 2 or 3 strawberries or candied cherries on 
top. A. T. S. 

Marshmallows soaked in orange juice over night and served 
in frappe glasses with whipped cream on top and 2 or 3 straw- 
berries makes a pretty and light dessert. A. T. S. 

PINEAPPLE PUDDING. 

One pint cream, 1 cup sugar, 4 eggs, 1 quart can of sliced 
pineapple. Pour the pineapple juice in a sauce pan, add sugar, 
put on and boil till a good syrup, then add the eggs which 
should be thoroughly beaten; cook a few minutes longer, stir- 
ring all the time; when done, remove from fire and allow to be- 
come cold. Add whipped cream and the finely chopped pine- 
apple. Put the mixture in a mold and pack in ice and rock 
salt. Allow to freeze about 4 hours. Mrs. T. B. R. 

SNOW PUDDING. 

Half box of Knox gelatin in a little cold water. Let it stand 
10 minutes, then pour over it a pint of boiling water, 2 cups 
of sugar, the rind and juice of 2 lemons. Let stand until it 
begins to stiffen (which will be about 1 or 1% hours). Then 
stir into it the whites of 2 eggs beaten to a stiff froth. Beat 
all together until white and stiff; put into small glasses to 
mold. When ready to use turn out on dish and serve with soft 
custard. 

SOFT CUSTARD. 

Beat the yolks of the 2 eggs; add 3 tablespoons of sugar 
and a pint of milk. Put on the stove and stir until it thickens. 
Do not let it boil. S. D. 



PRUNE SOUFFLE. 

Whites of 4 eggs, 1 cup sugar, 1 teaspoon cream tartar; beat 
till very stiff, then add 1 cup cooked prunes, stoned and 
chopped. Bake very slowly for 1 hour, putting dish in pan of 
water. Serve with cream, either whipped or plain. 

PRUNE WHIP. 

One big cup of prunes, stewed, pitted and mashed; whites of 
2 eggs well beaten, V teaspoon cream tartar, ^4 cup of sugar, 
a little vanilla. Mix together and put in oven for about 10 
minutes. Serve cold with cream. Mrs. S. S. 



100 PUDDINGS AND OTHER DESSERTS 

JELLIED PRUNES. 

Pick over, wash and soak, % pound of prunes in 2 cups 
cold water; cook in same water until soft. Remove prunes, 
stone and cut in small pieces. To prune water add enough 
boiling water to make 2 cups. Soak 2Y^ tablespoons granulated 
gelatin in ^ cup cold water, dissolve in hot liquid; add 1 cup 
sugar, % cup lemon juice, then strain; add prunes; mold and 
chill. Stir twice while cooking to prevent prunes from settling. 
L. K. 

QUINCE TAPIOCA. 

Cook tapioca in water until clear and thick as jelly. Sweeten 
to taste, and flavor with nutmeg and lemon juice. Then put in 
a buttered pudding dish, in layers, with chopped preserved 
quinces. Cover the top with a meringue made of the whites 
of 2 eggs, whipped stiff with 2 tablespoons of powdered sugar; 
set it in a slow oven and brown delicately. Serve with the 
syrup drained from the fruit as a sauce, or with whipped 
cream. 

APPLE CUP. 

Put Vz pint milk in a sauce pan over the fire; moisten 3 
tablespoons flour with a little cold milk; stir it into the hot 
milk and stir until smooth and thick. Take from fire and add 
beaten yolks of 4 eggs. Beat whites of eggs to a stiff froth and 
stir them in. Have nice sound apples pared and chopped fine. 
Mix them in the batter; fill into greased custard cups; stand in 
a pan of boiling water and bake in a moderate oven about 15 
or 20 minutes. Serve hot with hard or foam sauce. Mrs. E. J. 
McK. 

APPLE DUMPLING. 

One pint flour, 1 tablespoon lard, 1 teaspoon baking powder, 
salt, cold water; roll out and put Vz apple in each. L. K. 

AMBER PUDDING. 

Cook together 1 pound of pared and cored apples, 3 ounces 
of butter and the juice and grated rind of a lemon, until tender. 
Remove from the stove and stir in the beaten yolks of 3 eggs; 
then bake the mixture in pie crust. When brown spread with 
a meringue of the whites beaten light with 3 tablespoons sugar, 
and let this brown. Mrs. O. M. M. 



PUDDINGS AND OTHER DESSERTS 101 

MINUTE PUDDING. 

Scald 2 cups milk in a double boiler; mix 1 cup flour smooth 
with 1 cup cold milk, 2 beaten eggs, and salt. Add 2 cups boil- 
ing water to hot milk. When it boils add the flour and egg mix- 
ture; stir and beat for a minute, then cook 10 or 15 minutes. 
Serve with lemon sauce. L. K. 

COTTAGE PUDDING. 

Two heaping cups flour, 2 teaspoons baking powder, % tea- 
spoon salt, 1 egg, % cup sugar, 2 tablespoons melted cottolene, 1 
cup milk. Bake in moderate oven. L. K. 

SPONGE PUDDING. 

Half cup flour, J /4 cup sugar, 1 pint milk, boiled ; L 4 cup butter, 
yolks of 5 eggs, whites of 3 eggs. Mix the sugar and flour, wet 
with a little cold milk, and stir into the boiling milk. Cook un- 
til it thickens and is smooth. Add the butter and when well 
mixed, stir it into the well-beaten yolks of the eggs. Then add 
the whites beaten stiff. Rake in cups or in a shallow pan, in 
a hot oven. Stand the dish in a pan of hot water, while in the 
oven. Serve with cream sauce. This is fine. E. C. 

DATE PUDDING. 

Three eggs beaten separately, % cup sugar, pinch of salt, V<z 
cup of dates (cut up) and dusted with flour; % cup English 
walnuts (chopped), 1 cup bread crumbs, 1 teaspoon of baking 
powder in the bread crumbs. Bake in buttered dish and place 
in pan of water for about % hour. Serve with whipped cream 
or anv preferred sauce. Mrs. F. F. C. 

FIG PUDDING. 

Whites of 8 eggs beaten stiff, 1 cup of sugar, % pound of 
figs chopped fine, flavor with vanilla. Bake in slow oven 15 
or 20 minutes. Eat with whipped cream. M. D. B. 

BAKED INDIAN PUDDING. 

Two tablespoons of Indian meal, % cup molasses, 1 quart 
milk, 1 egg, butter % the size of an egg, % tablespoon ginger, 
1 teaspoon salt. Boil 1 pint of the milk, and pour it boiling on 
the meal, then turn in the molasses, and next the cold milk, 
butter, ginger, salt, and egg. Bake 1 hour in a moderate oven. 
Serve with cream. 



102 PUDDINGS AND OTHER DESSERTS 

INDIAN PUDDING. 

Two and a half pints of milk, 3 tablespoons corn meal, y?, 
cup molasses. Cook together in sauce pan until quite thick; 
then add Va pint cold milk, 1 egg, 1 tablespoon butter, 2 tea- 
spoons salt, Vi: teaspoon cinnamon. Bake slowly several hours. 

DELICIOUS RICE PUDDING. 

Boil 2 tablespoons of rice until done and dry. Then add 1 
pint milk, a pinch of salt, a small piece of butter. Put in the 
range to boil. Beat the yolks of 2 eggs with 4 tablespoons 
sugar. Pour milk and rice over the egg and sugar while boiling, 
stirring all the time to keep from curdling. Beat whites of eggs 
and spread over the top. Put in oven to brown slightly. E. W. 
C. 

QUEEN OF PUDDINGS. 

One pint fine sifted bread crumbs, 1 quart milk, 1 cup sugar, 
grated rind of 1 lemon, 4 eggs, yolks only; piece of butter size 
of egg. Bake, but do not allow to become watery. Spread a 
glass of currant jelly on this and add the well-beaten whites of 
the eggs mixed with 5 tablespoons sugar and juice of lemon. 
Place in oven to brown. H. W. M. 

DAINTY DESSERT. 

fake cup cakes 2 or 3 days old and hollow them out care- 
fully into little cups. Fill with cut and sweetened strawberries 
and serve with a spoonful of whipped cream on top. Mrs. 0. 
M. M. 

SNOW SAUCE. 

Cream together 2 tablespoons butter, 1 cup of powdered 
sugar and a whole egg. When smooth add a speck of salt and 
a teaspoon of vanilla. Just before serving blend carefully with 
a cup of whipped cream. B. C. C. 

STRAWBERRY CREAM OR SAUCE. 

One cup berries mashed; sweeten to taste; beat in whites 
of 2 eggs. Pour over cakes and serve. L. K. 

A NICE PUDDING SAUCE. 

Four tablespoons butter, 3 tablespoons thick cream, 1 cup of 
powdered sugar, yolks of 3 eggs. Beat all well together, and 
just before serving, stir in the whites that have been beaten 
stiff. Flavor to taste. M. E. S. 



PUDDINGS AND OTHER DESSERTS 103 

FOAM SAUCE. 

Into the beaten yolk of 1 egg stir 1 teaspoon of flour mixed 
with 2 tablespoons sugar. Set the dish into hot water and pour 
into the mixture 1 cup boiling water, stirring well. Cook for 
5 or 10 minutes; then beat into it the white of 1 well-beaten egg. 
E. H. W. 

RICE CREAM SHAPE Very Good. 

One-half ounce gelatine, 1 cup milk, 1 cup boiled rice, 2 
cup cream, whites of 4 eggs; flavor with lemon and a few drops 
almond. Soak gelatine in a little milk; boil the cup of milk, 
add the gelatine, rice and sugar. When partly stiff add the 
cream and whites of eggs separately. Pour into molds and 
serve w r ith cream or a custard made from the yolks of eggs. 



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Cakes. 

BAKING CAKE. 

The general rule in baking cake is to bake in a rising heat. 
After the heat has "set" the minute air cells or made them firm, 
then decrease the heat. If heat be suddenly withdrawn, or very 
much lowered, a cake, though fully risen, will fall. 

DELICATE CAKE. 

One cup of butter, 1 cup of milk, 3 cups of sugar, whites of 
8 eggs, 4 cups of flour (after sifting), 2 teaspoons yeast powder. 
Flavor. Mrs. C. P. H. 

COMPANY CAKE. 

Sift 2 teaspoons baking powder into 3 cups of sifted flour. 
Beat 4 eggs; add 2 cups fine sugar; stir gradually into eggs; Vz 
cup cold water. Add lightly prepared flour. Lastly stir in % 
cup of melted butter. Flavor. Mrs. C. P. H. 

POTATO CAKE. 

Mix in following order: 2 cups sugar, 1 cup butter, 4 eggs 
(whites beaten separately), % cup of milk, 1 cup mashed pota- 
toes, 1 scant cup of chocolate, 2 cups of flour, V-2 teaspoon of 
cinnamon, 1 teaspoon of cloves, 1 teaspoon of alspice, 1 cup of 
chopped walnuts, IVs teaspoons of baking powder. S. V. D. 

ONE-EGG LAYER OR LOAF CAKE Delicious. 

Two cups flour, 1 cup sugar, use vanilla or lemon flavoring, 
2 heaping teaspoons baking powder. Sift all together in bowl. 
Add 1 cup of sweet milk, 3 tablespoons of melted butter, and 
drop in the unbeaten egg. Stir all together and bake in 2 layers 
in well-buttered pans that have been sprinkled with dry flour. 
This recipe can be used in lots of different ways. By adding 1 
cup of seeded raisins, and a little citron makes a delicious loaf 
cake or cup cakes and different fillings. It is always light and 
delicious. J. P. B. 

ONE-EGG CAKE. 

One heaping tablespoon of butter, melted; 1 cup sugar, yolk 
of 1 egg, % cup of milk, 1 cup of flour with 1 teaspoon baking 



106 CAKES 

powder, pinch of salt, 2 tablespoons ground chocolate, white of 
1 egg beaten stiff lastly. Mrs. F. F. G. 

A RICH, DELICIOUS CAKE (No Eggs or Milk.) 

Cream together % cup butter and 1 cup sugar, 1 teaspoon 
each of cinnamon, nutmeg, allspice and cloves; add 1 cup seeded 
raisins. Stir a teaspoon of soda into a little warm water; stir 
it into 1 cup sour apple sauce. Let it foam over the ingredients 
in the bowl; mix well, then add 2 cups flour. Bake in loaf. 
(Cook apple sauce without sugar.) 

1-2-3-4 CAKE. 

One cup butter, 2 sugar, 3 flour, 4 eggs, 1 cup cold water, 3 
teaspoons baking powder. L. K. 

SWEET CREAM CAKE. 

Break 2 eggs into a cup. Fill the cup up with sweet cream. 
Pour into mixing bowl. Add 1 cup white sugar. Mix. Add 1 
full cup Hour sifted with 1 teaspoon baking powder. Flavor. 

SOUR CREAM CAKE. 

Break 1 egg into a cup, fill the cup with sour cream, thin. 
Pour into mixing bowl. Add 1 cup sugar; mix. Add 1% cups 
flour sifted with a scant % teaspoon of soda. Pinch of salt. 
Flavor. 

CAKE "Lightening," or "Quick." 

Dry: One and a half cups flour, % cup sugar, 2 teaspoons 
baking powder, % teaspoon salt. Liquid: One-quarter cup 
melted butter. Break 2 eggs into cup and fill up with milk. 
Pour liquid into dry ingredients. Flavor. Beat 2 minutes. 
Spread batter thicker around edges. Use cool oven. 

TAFT CAKE. 

One and a half cups sugar, 2 cups flour, 2 level teaspoons 
soda, 2 level teaspoons cinnamon, % teaspoon cloves, 3 table- 
spoons cornstarch, % teaspoon nutmeg. Sift all together. Toss 
in 1 cup walnuts, 1 cup raisins; stir all together. One and a 
half cups apple sauce, % cup melted butter. Beat well together. 
Bake 1 hour. Mrs. R. P. B. 

GRANDMOTHER'S CAKE. 

Two eggs, V-2 cup butter, IMj cups sugar, 3 cups flour, 1 cup 
milk, 1 teaspoon cream tartar, % soda spice. Mrs. J. L. W. 



CAKES 107 

SPONGE CUP CAKES. 



2 eggs, 1 cup sugar, 4 tablespoons water, 1 cup flour, 1 tea- 
spoon baking powder, 1 teaspoon flavoring. B. R. P. 



SPONGE CAKE. 

1 cup sugar, Mi cup milk and warm water, 4 eggs, 1 cup 
flour, 1 teaspoon baking powder, flavoring. Mix yolks of eggs 
and sugar to a cream; add water, then flour with baking pow- 
der; last whites of eggs beaten to a froth. Bake in rather slow 
oven M. D. B. 

VELVET SPONGE CAKE. 

2 eggs beaten light; beat in 1 cup of powdered sugar, l /2 cup 
flour. Next Vi cup flour sifted with 1 teaspoon baking powder, 
and lastly Vz (scant) cup of boiling water, very gradually. 
Bake gradually in buttered tin. W. S. 

CREAM SPICE CAKE. 

Two cups brown sugar, 2 cups flour, V* cup butter, 1 cup 
sour cream, 3 eggs, 1 teaspoon soda, 2 teaspoons each of cinna- 
mon (scant), cloves and allspice, and a little nutmeg. Mrs. 
W. S. 

CHINESE NUT CAKE. 

One cup butter, 2 cups sugar, 1 teaspoon each cinnamon and 
nutmeg, % teaspoon allspice, % teaspoon salt, 1 M> cups chopped 
walnuts, 4 eggs, beaten separately, 3 cups flour with 2 teaspoons 
baking powder, 1 cup water. Bake 45 minutes for loaf, 15 
minutes for layers. Moderate oven. M. X. M. 



BOILED RAISIN CAKE Fine. 

Cover 1V6 cups raisins (seeded) with boiling water and let 
simmer for 20 minutes. Then allow to cool. Sift together 1% 
cups flour and 1 teaspoon soda. Cream % cup sugar with 1 A 
cup of butter. Add to this % cup of the raisin water and 1 
egg beaten lightly (yolk and white) and a little of the flour. 
Beat lightly and then add the rest of the flour, together with Va 
teaspoon nutmeg, 1 teaspoon cinnamon, and 1 tablespoon grated 
cocoa or chocolate. Flour raisins and Vz cup English walnuts 
and add. Beat thoroughly, pour into pan lined with greased 
paper and bake in moderate oven. E. C. 



108 CAKES 

ENGLISH SODA CAKE. 

Two pounds flour, % pound lard, % pound butter, 1 pound 
sugar (light brown), 1% pounds currants, % pound citron, 2 
teaspoons soda, 4 eggs. Mix dry ingredients first; put together 
with as much milk as will make a medium batter. Bake in very 
slow oven 2 hours. 

TUMBLER CAKE. 

One tumbler sugar, 1 tumbler flour (sifted twice), 1 tea- 
spoon baking powder. Break 2 eggs in tumbler; fill glass with 
milk; add 3 tablespoons melted butter; mix all together and 
flavor with vanilla. S. B. J. 

HARD TIMES CAKE. 

One cup sugar. 1 cup hot water, 1 cup raisins, 2 cups flour, 3 
tablespoons shortening, 1 cup chocolate, spices to taste, cinna- 
mon, mace and clove; 2 teaspoons baking powder; nuts if de- 
sired. Boil sugar, raisins, shortening 5 minutes. Let cool and 
bake in layers, \vith soft filling. C. W. S. 

CHOCOLATE SPICE CAKE. 

.One-half cup butter, 1 cup sugar, % cup milk, 2 eggs, \Vz 
teaspoons baking powder, 1% cups flour, to which add % tea- 
spoon clove, % teaspoon nutmeg, % teaspoon cinnamon, 4 tea- 
spoons grated chocolate. L. C. W. 

ECONOMICAL SPICE CAKE. 

One cup brown sugar, 1 cup water, 2 cups raisins cut fine, 
Va or V cup shortening (Crisco), 1 teaspoon cinnamon, % tea- 
spoon cloves, a /4 teaspoon nutmeg, Vz teaspoon salt. Mix and 
let boil 3 minutes (stirring). Let cool and add 1 teaspoon soda 
dissolved in hot water, 2 cups flour unsifted (level), % tea- 
spoon baking powder in flour. Bake in moderate oven about 
40 minutes. H. W. M. 

SPICE CAKE. 

One cup brown sugar, y 3 cup butter, V-2 cup strong coffee, V-2 
cup chopped raisins, % cup chopped walnuts, \ 2 /$ cups flour, 
sifted before measuring, % teaspoon each of cloves, cinnamon 
and soda, 1 egg. Bake in loaf. B. R. P. 

SPICE CAKE (Delicious). 
Three eggs, save the white of one for frosting, 1 full cup of 



CAKES 109 

brown sugar, % cup of white sugar, 1 cup sour cream with 
soda enough to sweeten, perhaps Vz teaspoon, 3 tablespoons 
olive oil, 1 teaspoon cinnamon, 1 teaspoon vanilla, % nutmeg 
grated, 1% cups of flour, almost 2 cups, 1 teaspoon salt, 1 tea- 
spoon baking powder (heaping). Cook in slow oven. 

Frosting White of 1 egg, well beaten, 1 teaspoon cold 
water, 1 cup powdered sugar, vanilla. Mrs. S. S. 

SPICE CAKE (Use all the time very good). 

One cup butter, 1 cup sour milk, 2 eggs, 1 teaspoon soda, % 
teaspoon ginger, 2 teaspoons cinnamon, 2 cups sugar, 3 cups 
flour, 1 cup raisins, Va teaspoon cloves, 1 teaspoon nutmeg. 
L. K. 

APPLE SPICED CAKE. 

One cup sugar, YT, cup butter, 1 cup sour apple sauce (hot), 
V-2 teaspoon cinnamon, % teaspoon cloves, Vz teaspoon nutmeg, 
1 pinch of salt, 1 cup of raisins, chopped, 1 cup of English wal- 
nuts, chopped, 1% cups flour with 1 level teaspoon soda mixed 
in it (no eggs, no milk). Bake in a loaf, slowly. Mrs. F. F. C. 

DRIED APPLE CAKE. 

Soak 2 cups dried apples over night. In the morning drain 
and chop fine; add 1 cup of molasses and let boil slowly on the 
back of the stove until the molasses has thickened; let cool. 
Add the following: 1 cup of butter, 1% cups brown sugar, 3% 
cups flour, % cup sour milk, 3 eggs, 1 teaspoon soda, pinch of 
salt, cloves, allspice and cinnamon, teaspoon of each. M. D. B. 

MY SISTER'S BREAD CAKE Fine. 

Piece of dough large enough for a loaf, 1% cups sugar, % cup 
butter, 1 A cup milk, 3 eggs beaten separately, 1 small teaspoon 
saleratus, 1 teaspoon cinnamon, ^ teaspoon nutmeg, % teaspoon 
cloves, 1 cup chopped raisins, 1 cup currants. Mix thoroughly 
together and then knead into loaf well. Add whites of eggs 
last. Let raise 20 minutes and bake 1 hour, or until cooked. 
Mrs. J. M. F. 

QUICK COFFEE CAKE. 

Two cups flour (sifted), 2 teaspoons baking powder, % cup 
sugar, % teaspoon of salt, 1 tablespoon melted butter, 1 egg, 
sweet milk to make a thin batter. Pour in pan and put % cup 
of sugar and. sprinkle cinnamon on top and bake in a moderate 
oven. S. E. D. 



110 CAKES 

GINGER CAKE WITHOUT BUTTER OR EGGS. 

One cup molasses, 3 tablespoons of melted lard, 1 teaspoon 
allspice, 1 teaspoon cloves, 2 teaspoons ginger, 1 teaspoon cinna- 
mon, 1 teaspoon salt, 1 cup of boiling water, 1 cup of raisins, 
enough flour to thicken. Bake in slow oven. Mrs. F. H. L. 

SOFT GINGERBREAD. 

Mix in order in which given, 1 cup granulated sugar, 1 cup 
butter, yolks of 3 eggs, beaten, 1 cup Orleans molasses, 1 cup 
buttermilk or sour cream with 2 teaspoons soda in milk, 2% 
cups flour with 1 teaspoon baking powder, 1 teaspoon lemon, 1 
teaspoon ginger, 1 teaspoon allspice, beaten whites of the 3 eggs 
whipped in with the last of the flour. Bake slowly. S. D. 

FRUIT GINGERBREAD. 

One cup sugar, 1 cup New Orleans molasses, 1 slice butter, 
Vz inch thick (melted), 1 teaspoon cinnamon, 1 teaspoon ginger 
(scant), 1 teaspoon soda in 1 cup of boiling water, 3 cups of 
flour, 1 cup chopped raisins, 1 cup chopped walnuts, 2 egg 
dropped in whole the last thing. Bake in slow oven. Mrs. F. 
F. C. 

SOFT (PLAIN) GINGERBREAD. 

One-half cup sugar, Vi cup butter or Crisco, 2 eggs beaten 
separately, 1 cup New Orleans molasses (scant), 1 teaspoon cin- 
namon, 2 teaspoons ginger (scant), % teaspoon allspice, 2 cups 
flour. Stir well into batter % cup sour milk with 1 level tea- 
spoon soda in it. Bake in slow oven. Mrs. F. F. C. 

NOVELTY GINGERBREAD. 

Cream together % cupful of sugar and % cupful of butter. 
Add Vz cupful of molasses and % cupful of hot water in which 
is dissolved 1 teaspoon of soda. Beat this mixture thorough- 
ly and add 1 beaten egg and 1 teaspoon of ginger. Stir in 1% 
cups of flour, beat hard and pour into long, shallow pan. When 
baked cut across and remove half from the pan. Cover the 
other half with marshmallows and return to the oven until they 
are soft and puffy. Then put the other half of the cake on 
top and press down gently. Serve warm. Mrs. O. M. M. 

GERMAN APPLE CAKE. 

Beat the yolks of 2 eggs and add l a /2 cups of milk, 1 tea- 
spoon of melted butter, % teaspoon of salt and 2 cups of flour 
sifted with three teaspoons of baking powder. Stir in the beat- 



CAKES 1 1 1 

en whites last and pour the batter into a shallow pan. Cover 
with sliced apples, sprinkle with sugar and cinnamon and bake. 
Mrs. O. M. M. 

DUTCH PEACH CAKE. 

Separate 2 eggs, beat the yolks, add a cup of milk, a table- 
spoon of melted butter, % teaspoon of salt and IVn cups flour; 
beat thoroughly, add 2 level teaspoons of baking powder, beat 
again, and fold in the well-beaten whites of the eggs. Pour this 
into a shallow baking pan, cover the top with halves of pared 
peaches, dust with Vz cup of sugar, and bake in a moderately 
quick oven a half hour. Serve warm, with milk or cream. 
This will serve six or eight people. The recipe is easily divided. 

A CHILD'S BIRTHDAY CAKE. 

For a child's birthday party bake little cakes in gem pans. 
When ready for icing, make a small hole in the top of each 
cake and slip in a tiny doll the penny variety will do. Then 
ice as desired. The icing will hold the doll in place, and each 
little girl will be delighted with a dolly cake. Z. 

FRUIT CAKE (EXCELLENT FOR WEDDING CAKE). 

Eleven eggs, % pound butter, 3 cups brown sugar, 1 cup New 
Orleans molasses, Vz cup sour cream, % cup strong black coffee, 
1 cup ground chocolate, 2 pounds raisins, 2 pounds dried cur- 
rants, % pound citron, Vz cup chopped walnuts, Vz cup pressed 
figs, Vz cup currant or grape jelly, 1 tablespoon of cinnamon, 
clove, allspice, % teaspoon mace, % teaspoon vanilla, as much 
flour as can be mixed with a spoon, 1 teaspoon baking soda, % 
teaspoon baking powder; cream butter and sugar; add yolks of 
eggs 1 at a time, unbeaten; beat well; then jelly, chocolate and 
spices; beat well; then add cream and coffee, then flour and 
whites of eggs, well beaten. Sift baking powder and soda with 
flour; last fruit and nuts well floured. Mix well with hands. 
Hake in very slow oven 3 or 4 hours. Line pan with well 
greased paper. This cake is best if baked in one large loaf. 
A. L. B. 



112 CAKES 

ADDITIONAL RECIPES 



CAKES 113 

ADDITIONAL RECIPES 



SPECIAL MOULDS 
Frozen Puddings, Bricks and Punches for All Occasions 

When you want the Best call up Berkeley 2603 

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GROCERY 

2801 Telegraph Ave., Cor. Stuart 
Berkeley, Cal. 



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DRUGS AND CHEMICALS 

Delivery service at the other end 
of your phone Berk. 147 & 148 

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Martin and Clayworth 
2134 Shattuck Ave. Berkeley, Cal. 



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ORIENTAL FABRICS AND NOVELTIES 

Mrs. Minnie R. Churchill 

1641 Euclid Avenue, Berkeley, Cal. 

Direct Importer of 
Mandarin Coats, Kimonos, Dress Patterns and Laces, unusual 

novelties especially suited for prizes and gifts. 

Her stock includes many fascinating and novel things that will 

solve your Christmas difficulties. 

Hours 9 a. m. to 5:30 p. m. 
Phone Berkeley 2401 



Layer Cakes. 



CREAM CAKE. 



One and one-half cups sugar in mixing pan. Cut about ^ 
inch from a square of butter, break into pieces and drop on 
top of the sugar. Set in the oven for about a minute or until 
the butter begins to soften. Take out and beat about 2 min- 
utes; whip in beaten yolks of 3 eggs; add a cup of milk and 1% 
cups of flour with 2 teaspoons of baking powder. Flavor with 
1 teaspoon vanilla. Bake in 3 layers. 

Filling Whip 1 pint of pastry cream, add 2 tablespoons 
sugar and 1 teaspoon vanilla. Spread between layers and on 
top with sliced bananas. S. D. 

DATE CAKE. 

Five eggs, 1 cup sugar (granulated), 2 heaping tablespoons 
flour, 1 teaspoon baking powder, 1 pound chopped dates, 1 cup 
chopped w r alnuts, little vanilla. Beat yolks and sugar, flour and 
baking powder sifted together, nuts, dates, vanilla and lastly 
whites of eggs, well beaten. Bake in moderate oven in two lay- 
ers. When cold, add whipped cream filling. 

DATE CAKE. 

Three-quarters cup butter (scant), 1 cup flour, 1 cup sugar, 
% cup water, 1 cup walnuts, % cup dates, 2 eggs, % teaspoon 
soda. Loaf or layer. 

Date Filling White of 1 egg, 1 cup sugar boiled, Vz cup 
dates. Mrs. R. P. B. 

FIG CAKE. 

One-quarter cup butter, 2 eggs, 2 teaspoons baking powder, 
*/3 cup of sugar, V4 cup milk, l 1 /^ cups flour, 2 teaspoons vanilla. 
Cream butter and sugar, add beaten yolks, then milk, then sift 
flour with baking powder and add to other ingredients; add 
vanilla and pour into 2-layer cake tins, and bake in hot oven. 
Spread with fig filling. Save 3 teaspoons of filling and add to 
beaten white of 1 egg and Va cup of powdered sugar. Cover 
with this frosting. 

FIG FILLING. 

One-half pound figs, finely chopped, % cup sugar, y 3 cup 



116 LAYER CAKES 

boiling water, 1 tablespoon lemon juice. Mix ingredients in the 
order given and cook in double boiler until thick enough to 
spread. Spread while hot. Figs may be chopped by forcing 
through meat chopper. Mrs. H. T. 

LEBKUCHEN. 

Four eggs, 2 cups brown sugar, ^ teaspoon cloves, }4 tea- 
spoon allspice, 1 teaspoon cinnamon, 1 cup chopped blanched 
almonds, 1 cup chopped citron, 4 tablespoons chocolate, 2 table- 
soons molasses, 2 cups flour, 2 teaspoons baking powder. Bake 
in 2 square tins. 

Frosting One cup granulated sugar, 2 tablespoons choco- 
late, 1 A teaspoon vanilla with 2 tablespoons water. Boil until 
it threads. Pour over cakes and spread. Cut in squares when 
about cool. A. T. S. 



HARLEQUIN CAKE. 

Three-fourths cup butter, 2 cups sugar, 1 cup milk, 3 eggs, 

2 teaspoons baking powder, 2 cups flour. Cream butter and 
sugar; add yolks well beaten, then milk, then flour and baking 
powder; well beaten whites last. Divide this into four parts; 
have two parts white, one part pink (with fruit coloring), and 
one chocolate. Spread layers with boiled icing. 

Icing. One cup sugar boiled in 4 tablespoons water. When 
it ropes from spoon, add to the well beaten white of 1 egg. 
Beat well and add flavoring. Mrs. W. S. 

SIMPLE LAYER CAKE. 

One cup flour, 1 cup sugar, 2 teaspoons baking powder; sift 

3 times. Into same measuring cup break 2 eggs, 3 tablespoons 
of melted butter. Fill cup with milk. Stir into flour; beat to- 
gether. Flavor. Mrs. C. P. H. 

OLD FASHIONED LAYER CAKE. 

Materials One cup of butter (scant), 2 cups sugar, 4 eggs, 
3 cups of flour sifted twice, 1 cup sweet milk, 3 teaspoons bak- 
ing powder. Way of preparing. Divide into 3 parts. To the 
third part add % cup of molasses and spices, cinnamon, allspice, 
cloves, mace, 2 teaspoon of each, add a trifle more flour, put 
together with frosting. Spiced layer in middle. 

Frosting. Whites of 2 eggs; 2 cups of bar sugar; 1 grated 
lemon and juice. E. W. C. 



LAYER CAKES 117 

LIGHTNING CAKE. 

One cup sugar, 1 cup flour, 2 small teaspoons baking powder. 
Sift together 3 times. (2 eggs, 4 tablespoons melted butter. Put 
in cup and fill with milk.) Beat all together. Bake either loaf 
or 2 layers. 

Chocolate Icing. One cup brown sugar, 2 large spoons choc- 
late, piece of butter size of a walnut. Mix and stir in 2 table- 
spoons of coffee, hot. 

Chocolate Icing. One and one-half cups sugar, 3 large 
kitchen spoons of chocolate, water to mix, boiled; slice of but- 
ter, thin, makes it stick to cake and not crumble. Mrs. R. P. B. 

LILY CAKE. 

One cup butter, 1 cup sugar, % cup milk, 1% cups flour, 2 Ms 
teaspoons baking powder, whites of 3 eggs, j/j teaspoon lemon 
or % teaspoon of vanilla extract. This will make a nice layer 
cake if divided into half and frosted with either white or any 
frosting one may desire. Mrs. G. S. W. 

POTATO FLOUR CAKE. 

Four eggs, 1 cup sugar, Ms cup potato flour, 1 teaspoon bak- 
ing powder, Ms teaspoon salt, flavoring. Beat yolks thoroughly; 
add sugar little at a time. Beat whites very stiff and add to 
yolks and sugar, then add flour and baking powder. Bake in 
slow oven about 30 minutes. Nice made as layer cake and 
filled w r ith whipped cream. 

APPLE CREAM CAKE. 

One-half cup sugar, MJ cup milk, 1 egg, % cup melted but- 
ter, 1 teaspoon lemon extract, IMs teaspoons baking powder, 
enough flour to make a smooth batter (not a stiff cake batter). 
Mix well and bake in 3 layers. Filling between layers and on 
top. Grate 1 large apple, add 1 cup sugar, the beaten white of 
1 egg, 1 teaspoon flavoring. Beat all together with an egg beater 
until light and creamy. This is fine with strawberries instead 
of apple. S. E. I). 

CREAM BANANA CAKE. 

Cream a scant Ms cup of butter, add gradually 1 cup sugar 
and beat until light and creamy. 2 cups flour, 2 teaspoons bak- 
ing powder; add to first mixture alternately with J /2 cup milk; 
then add beaten whites of 4 eggs; flavor with MJ teaspoon al- 
mond or vanilla. Beat entire mixture 10 minutes and bake 25 
minutes in 2 layers. 

Cream for above. Boil 1 cup sugar and % cup water until 



118 LAYER CAKES 

it strings. Pour slowly on beaten white of 1 egg. Beat until 
cool. Spread layer on cake then layer of bananas sliced thin, 
then another layer of cream. M. X. M. 

MOCHA CAKE. 

One-half cup butter, 1 cup sugar, 1% cups flour, % cup cold 
black coffee, 1 teaspoon baking powder, whites of 3 eggs. 

Filling and Icing. Two cups powdered sugar sifted 5 times, 
scant Vz cup butter to cream it. When well creamed add 2 
tablespoons cold black coffee. M. X. M. 

MOCHA CREAM CAKE. 

One and two-thirds cups of sifted flour, 1 cup sugar and \Vz 
teaspoons baking powder. Sift all together. Break 3 eggs into 
a bowl and add Vz cup of milk. Pour eggs and milk into the 
dry ingredients and beat all together with an egg whip. Then 
add Vs of a cup of melted butter and 1 teaspoon of vanilla; bake 
in 2 large layers. 

Filling. Two tablespoons coffee, 1 cup boiling water. Boil 
down to Vz cup. One pat unsalted butter beaten to a cream; 
add gradually 1 cup powdered sugar and beat well. Add 2 
tablespoons black coffee and 1 teaspoon vanilla, a little at a 
time, to prevent curdling. Beat all until very light and creamy 
and place between the layers. 

Frosting. One and one-half tablespoon black coffee; add 
powdered sugar to make it thick and spread over top of cake. 
Mrs. R. I. 

CHOCOLATE MARSHMALLOW CAKE. 

One-half cup of butter, 1 cup of sugar, 2 cups of flour, I 1 /-; 
teaspoons of baking powder, Vz cup of water, and the whites of 
4 eggs beaten stiff. When baked in a large shallow pan, cover 
thickly with marshmallow filling as follows: Cook 1% cups 
of sugar with Vz cup of milk for 10 minutes. Melt Vz pound of 
marshmallows in a little water and add to the milk and sugar. 
Beat till thick; flavor with vanilla. When the marshmallow fill- 
ing has had time to cool on the cake, cover with melted unsweet- 
ened chocolate. 

PENOCHE CAKE. 

Two cups brown sugar, Vz cup of butter, Vz cup of sweet 
milk, 2 eggs, 3 cups sifted flour, 2 teaspoons of yeast powder, 
Vz a cup of chocolate filled with Vz a cup of hot water, added 
last. 



LAYER CAKES llv 

Filling. Two cups of brown sugar, V-2 cup of sweet milk, 
1 cup of chopped nuts, butter size of an egg. If filling becomes 
too stiff to spread upon cake add a little milk. 

CARAMEL CAKE 

One and one-half cups sugar, Vz cup butter, 3 eggs, % cup 
milk, 2 cups flour, 2 tablespoons baking powder. 

Frosting. Three cups brown sugar, 1 cup white sugar, 1 
cup cream, 1 tablespoon butter, 1 teaspoon vanilla. Boil until 
creamy. Beat well. Mrs. R. P. B. 

BURNT SUGAR CAKE. 

One cup of granulated sugar, 1 cup cold water. Boil this 
without stirring until it becomes dark brown and smokes; then 
thin it with a scant cup of boiling water. Let this cool before 
using it. 

Layer Cake Part. One and one-half cups sugar, % cup but- 
ter, yolks of 2 eggs, 1 cup cold water, % teaspoon vanilla, 2 
cups flour, 2 teaspoons baking powder. Beat this 5 minutes and 
add the beaten whites of 2 eggs and 4 teaspoons or more of the 
burnt sugar. 

Iceing. Add 3 tablespoons of burnt sugar to regular boiled 
iceing. Mrs. E. B. G. 

LEMON FROSTING CAKE. 

Two cups sugar, % cup butter, 2 eggs and yolks of 2 more, 
1 cup sweet milk, 3 cups flour, 2 teaspoons baking powder. 

Frosting Whites of 2 eggs, 2 cups of fine sugar, 1 grated 
lemon and juice. Mrs. G. S. W. 

Frosting Without Eggs. 

MOCHA ICING. 

Put a cup of sweet cream, 2 /3 cup of sugar and a level tea- 
spoon of butter in an agate saucepan. As soon as the mixture 
begins to thread, remove from the stove. Add ~V of a cup of 
strong coffee. 

BOILED ICING. 

One cup of sugar and 2 tablespoons of milk. Boil until it 
will "hair" on the spoon, taking care not to cook too much. Re- 
move from the fire and stir until it becomes smooth and white. 



120 LAYER CAKES 

MAPLE SYRUP ICING. 

One cup of maple sugar, % cup of milk. Put these into a 
saucepan and let thicken until a soft, rather thick mass is 
formed when a spoonful is dropped into cold water. Then add 
a tablespoon of butter. When partly cold, beat thoroughly, as 
it becomes smooth by continued beating. Chopped nuts added 
are excellent. 

GRANDMOTHER'S STRAWBERRY SHORTCAKE. 

Stem 2 boxes of strawberries. Reserve 1 cup of the nicest 
berries for the top of the shortcake. Mash the remainder, add 
% cup of sugar, and stir a minute to dissolve the sugar. Sift 
1 pint of flour with % teaspoon of salt and 2 level teaspoons of 
baking powder. Rub in 1 tablespoon of butter, and add enough 
milk just to moisten. Knead quickly, and roll out in the shape 
of the pan in which it is to be baked. Rrush with milk, and 
bake in a quick oven for 20 minutes. Pull it apart without cut- 
ting you can do this easily with 2 forks. Remove a portion 
of the crumb from the center, butter both pieces, place the 
bottom on the serving-dish, pour over the mashed berries, put 
on the top, garnish it neatly with the whole berries, dust thickly 
with powdered sugar, and send to the table with a pitcher of 
cream. 

LOVERS' WEDDING CAKE. 

Four pounds of flour of love, % pound of buttered youth, 
% pound of good looks, % pound of sweet temper, % pound of 
self forgetfulness, Vz pound of powdered wits, % ounce of dry 
humor, 2 tablespoons of argument, % pint of rippling laughter, 
% wine glass of common sense. Then put the flour of love, 
good looks and sweet temper into a well furnished house; beat 
the butter of youth to a cream. Mix together blindness of 
faults, self-forgetfulness, powdered wits, dry humor, into sweet 
argument. Then add them to the above. Pour in gently ripling 
laughter and common sense. Work it together until it is well 
mixed; then bake it gently forever. C. S. 



LAYER CAKES 121 

ADDITIONAL RECIPES 



Cookies and Small Cakes. 



COOKIES. 

Three-fourths cup of butter, l 1 /^ cups sugar, 3 eggs, 2 tea- 
spoons baking powder, sufficient flour to roll very thin. Flavor 
with vanilla. Bake slowly. 

BOSTON COOKIES. 

One cup of butter, 1% cups of sugar, 2V-2 cups of flour, 
\Vz cups raisins (chopped), 3 eggs, pinch of salt, a little nutmeg, 
cinnamon and cloves, % scant teaspoon of soda in a little warm 
water, % teaspoon of baking powder in flour. Spread in a 
large bread pan about %-inch thick and then place English wal- 
nuts all over the top. Bake and then cut in squares. Mrs. F. C. 

NUT COOKIES. 

One cup butter, 1% cups sugar, 3 eggs, 1 cup walnut meats 
slightly broken, % teaspoon baking powder, 1 teaspoon lemon 
extract. Use the least flour possible. Roll thin; sift sugar on 
top and bake a very light brown. Mrs. J. L. W. 

SOUR CREAM COOKIES. 

Two cups sugar, 2 eggs, salt, 1 cup sour cream, 1 teaspoon 
soda dissolved in cream, 1 cup butter, 1 teaspoon lemon extract, 
or % nutmeg grated. Enough flour to handle. Mrs. E. J. McK. 

MOLASSES NUT CAKES. 

One-half a cup of brown sugar and the same quantity of 
butter creamed; add % cup of molasses, a beaten egg, 2 /z of a 
cup of milk, teaspoon of soda sifted with 2 cups of flour, cup 
of seeded and chopped raisins, spices to flavor, % cup of cleaned 
currants and the same quantity of chopped pecans. Fill deep 
patty pans and bake in hot oven. 

OAT MEAL DROP CAKES. 

Mix together 2 cups of oat meal, a cup of seeded raisins, a 
cup of nut meats, and chop all together well. Add % cup of 
softened butter, creamed with 1 cup of sugar; add 3 beaten 



COOKIES AND SMALL CAKES 123 

eggs, 2 teaspoon of soda in % cup of milk. The grated rind 
of a lemon or orange with a tablespoon of the juice is also an 
excellent addition. Two cups of flour. Beat well, and drop 
from small spoon on buttered tin and bake. 

GINGER COOKIES. 

Two cups sugar, 1 cup New Orleans molasses, 2 cup butter, 
2 cup lard, scant cup boiling water, 2 heaping teaspoons soda, 
2 heaping teaspoons ginger. Flour to roll. 

HERMITS. 

One cup butter, 2 cups sugar, 4 eggs, 2 teaspoon soda, 4 
tablespoons sour milk, 2 teaspoons cinnamon, 1 teaspoon cloves, 
2 cups seeded raisins, 1 cup chopped nuts, 4 cups flour. Drop 
from teaspoon on greased tins and bake. H. S. 

ROLLED OATS COOKIES. 

One scant tablespoon butter, 1 cup sugar, 2 eggs beaten 
separate, 2% full cups rolled oats, 1 teaspoon baking powder, 
flavor. Bake slowly; small pats. Mrs. R. P. B. 

NUT CRISPS. 

One tablespoon melted butter, 1 cup sugar, 2 eggs, beaten 
separately; 2% cups rolled oats (dry), 2 teaspoons baking pow- 
der, and Vz teaspoon salt mixed with oats; 1 teaspoon vanilla, 
and about 2 drops almond extract, or a little nutmeg. Drop 
from teaspoon on large pan. Bake slowly. L. C. W. 

NUT MARGUERITES. 

Two eggs, 1 cup brown sugar, 2 cup flour, 1 A teaspoon 
baking powder, s teaspoon salt, a little vanilla extract, 1 cup 
English walnuts chopped. Bake in gem pans in slow oven. 
This makes 1 dozen. Mrs. F. F. C. 

NUT KISSES. 

Whites of (i eggs, 1 pound sugar, 1 pound chopped hickory 
(or English walnuts). Beat eggs and sugar until stiff. Add the 
nuts. Drop from spoon into pans lined with buttered paper. 
Put into moderate oven until slightly browned. E. C. 

COCOANUT KISSES. 

Two whites of eggs (beaten stiff), 1 cup of sugar, 2 cups of 
shredded cocoanut, 2 tablespoons of flour. Bake in slow oven. 
Just a little of above mixture on tip of spoon for each one. Do 
not remove from pan until cold. Mrs. F. F. C. 



124 COOKIES AND SMALL CAKES 

MARSHMALLOW KISSES. 

Place one marshmallow upon a Barinet cracker and upon it 
a tiny piece of crystalized ginger. Place in oven until tinged 
a golden hue. Serve with tea. M. X. M. 

MARSHMALLOW CAKES. 

Cream together % cup of butter and 2 cups of fine sugar. 
Add a tea cup of sweet milk, the whites of 5 eggs beaten stiff 
and 2 cups of flour sifted 4 times. Bake in a large sheet and 
cut into small squares when cold. Spread with marshmallow 
filling and decorate with nuts. 

NUT BARS. 

Mix 1 cup of brown sugar with 1 egg, 1 cup of walnut 
meats broken into bits, V teaspoon of soda dissolved in a tea- 
spoon of hot water, and 2 large tablespoons of flour. Bake in 
a thin sheet and cut in bars. 

MAPLE GEMS. 

Two cups of maple sugar shaved, % cup of milk or cream, 
% cup of soft butter, 2 beaten eggs, 2 teaspoons of baking pow- 
der, and sufficient flour to make rather a stiff batter. Bake in 
hot buttered gem pans and serve hot. 

MARGUERITES. 

Beat the white of an egg very light and add 1 cup of pow* 
dered sugar. Stir in y$ of a cup of finely chopped nuts, and 
spread the mixture on salted crackers. Put in oven until nicely 
browned. Mrs. O. M. M. 

ORANGE WAFERS. 

One-fourth cup butter, Vz cup sugar, 1 egg, 2 tablespoons 
orange juice and a little grated rind, 1 cup flour, 1 teaspoon 
baking powder. Roll thin, adding a little more flour if neces- 
sary. Sprinkle wafers with sugar and bake in moderate oven. 
L. C. W. 

GOO GOO EYES. 

One and one-half cups brown sugar, 1 cup of butter, 3 eggs, 
2Vz cups flour, 1% teaspoons cinnamon, 2 teaspoons baking 
powder, 1 cup raisins, 1 cup walnuts, 1 teaspoon soda with 2 
tablespoons of hot water, % teaspoon salt, % teaspoon nutmeg. 
Drop on tin not too thick. Cream the butter and sugar well, 
and beat eggs very light. M. E. S. 



COOKIES AND SMALL CAKES 125 

JIM'S DEW-DROPS. 

Cream 1 scant cup of sugar with 1 tablespoon of butter. 
Add 2 beaten eggs, % cup of milk, 2 cups of flour sifted with 1 
teaspoon of baking powder. Flavor and drop by small spoon- 
fuls on a baking pan. When baked, frost and sprinkle with 
cocoanut. Mrs. O. M. M. 

COCOANUT MACAROONS Easy to Make. 

Whites of 3 eggs beaten light; add 1 cup of sugar, 3 table- 
spoons of cracker crumbs, rolled fine; 2 cups of cocoanut, 
shredded; add almond flavoring; drop in teaspoonfuls on well- 
buttered tins. Bake in slow oven about 15 minutes. Let cool 
and remove. Makes about 60. J. P. B. , 

FRUIT AND NUT COOKIES. 

Beat 1% cups of light brown sugar with 1 cup of butter and 
lard. Add 2 eggs, beaten; ^ cup molasses, % teaspoon each of 
nutmeg, cinnamon and cloves, % cup of sour milk with 2 tea- 
spoons soda, 1 cup of chopped raisins, 1 cup of chopped wal- 
nuts. Use flour enough to roll; cut, and bake in a quick oven. 

MACARONI CROQUETTES. 

Break into small pieces 6 ounces of macaroni; throw this 
into boiling water and boil rapidly 20 minutes. When done 
drain in a colander and throw into cold water to blanch for 15 
minutes. Put % pint of milk into a double boiler; rub together 
1 tablespoon butter, and 4 even tablespoons of flour; stir into 
hot milk, stirring continually until a thick paste is formed. 
Then add the yolks of 2 eggs. Cook a moment longer. Take 
from the fire; add 2 tablespoons grated cheese, and seasoning 
of salt and pepper. Drain and shake the macaroni; cut it into 
fine pieces; stir these into the mixture and turn out to cool. 
When cold form into croquettes, dip first into egg and then into 
fine bread crumbs and fry in deep smoking hot fat. This 
quantity will make 18 good sized croquettes. Mrs. E. J. McK. 

RICH CRUELLS. 

One cup of sugar, 3 tablespoons of butter, 4 eggs, 1 gill of 
milk, % teaspoon of salt, % teaspoon of nutmeg, 2 teaspoons 
of baking powder, 1 quart of flour, the grated rind of 1 lemon. 
Mix baking powder, salt, nutmeg, with flour, and put through 
a sieve; then rub in the butter. Beat the eggs, add sugar, lemon 
rind and milk. Pour the liquid on the dry ingredients, adding 
enough flour to make a soft dough. Cut and fry in hot fat. 
When cool roll in powdered sugar. 



126 COOKIES AND SMALL CAKES 

DOUGHNUTS Fine. 

One cup sugar, 2 tablespoons lard, 1 cup sweet milk, 2 tea- 
spoons baking powder, 1 egg. Mix with as little flour as will 
roll well. L. K. 

DOUGHNUTS. 

One cup sugar, 1 cup milk, 1 teaspoon nutmeg, 1 teaspoon 
salt, 2 tablespoons shortening (same as frying fat), 3 eggs, 2 
teaspoons baking powder, flour enough to roll out. Mrs. F. S. 
McC. 



COOKIES AND SMALL CAKES 127 

ADDITIONAL RECIPES 



Ices and Cold Desserts. 



THREE OF A KIND. 

Boil 3 cups of water and 3 cups of sugar for 3 minutes. Add 
the juice of 3 oranges and 3 lemons and the mashed and sifted 
pulp of 3 bananas. When perfectly cold add the beaten white 
of an egg and freeze. Mrs. O. M. M. 

MARSHMALLOW FLUFF. 

Use 1 pound marshmallows, % pound English walnuts, 
whites of 2 eggs, 1 pint double cream; whip cream to stiff 
froth; fold in egg whites well beaten; cut marshmallows in 
small pieces and add with nuts. Bananas or berries may also 
be used. Sweeten to taste. Serve in tall glasses. L. K. 

STRAWBERRY SHERBET. 

Two boxes fresh berries crushed fine, 1 pint sugar, 1 % pints 
water. Boil water and sugar together for 20 minutes; add the 
juice of 2 lemons. Mix everything together and freeze. 

For orange sherbet take the juice of 1 dozen oranges and 
make like the above. Strain before freezing. Mrs. S. J. S. 

ICE CREAM. 

Two cups milk, 1 cup sugar, 3 eggs, yolks only; heat these 
ingredients and when cool add 1 pint rich cream, whites of 3 
eggs beaten very light. Flavor and freeze. L. C. W. 

CAFE FRAPPE For One Person. 

One egg, 1 tablespoon sugar, 4 very full tablespoons cream, 
1 or 2 tablespoons essence of Turkish coffee. For 6 people 
One pint cream. Mix sugar and yolk of egg together well. Put 
in farina kettle having the water boiling. Stir constantly until 
it thickens. Let it cool, not cold. Whip the cream; add the 
white of egg beaten stiff. Then pour the yolk and sugar onto 
the beaten cream and white of egg. Add coffee essence. Put 
in jelly glasses and cover tightly with the metal tops. Stand 
in a pan full of ice and salt. Let them stand 3 or 4 hours and 
then turn out and serve. 



ICES AND DESSERTS 129 

RASPBERRY MOUSSE. 

Three cups heavy cream, whipped; 1Y2 cups crushed rasp- 
berries, % cup powdered sugar. Time to make. Preparation, 
15 minutes; freezing, 3 hours. Add the sugar and the berries 
to the cream; which has been whipped until stiff. Mix care- 
fully, and pour into a mold. Cover and bind the seam with a 
strip of muslin or cheese cloth which has been dipped into 
melted fat or paraffin. Pack in a tub of crushed ice and salt 
allowing about 1 cup of salt to every 3 cups of ice and let 
stand for about 3 hours. When properly frozen, this should 
be solid on the outside, but creamy in the center. This dessert 
is easily made, wholesome and nice enough for any dinner, no 
matter how formal. Other mousses may be made in the same 
way by simply changing the fruit or flavor used. B. 

MAPLE MOUSSE. 

One pint thick cream, whipped; then stir in 1 cup maple 
syrup, 1 cup walnuts chopped fine, 1 box marshmallows (lOc 
size), cut in small pieces; 12 maraschino cherries chopped. Pack 
in car or mold and bury in salt and ice for 4 hours (half salt 
and half ice). This makes nearly 2 quarts and will serve 14 
easily. Mrs. G. S. W. 

STRAWBERRY CHARLOTTE. 

Mash 1 box of prime berries through a colander, add 2 /z of 
a cup of powdered sugar, and stir until it dissolves. Soak % 
box of granulated gelatin in a % cup of cold water for 30 
minutes, then melt it over hot water. Add the strawberry juice, 
and stir continually until the mixture begins to thicken, then 
fold in a pint of whipped cream. Pour into a mold, and stand 
on ice to harden. Serve plain. 

FROZEN PUDDING WITH STRAWBERRY COMPOTE 

Beat the yolks of 3 eggs; boil % pound of sugar and a pint 
of water for 5 minutes; add the yolks, and beat over the fire 
for 1 minute. Stand the saucepan in a pan of ice-water, and 
beat until cold. Add V of a pound of chopped candied cherries, 
freeze until hard, then work in 1 pint of cream, whipped. Cover 
and repack for 1 or 2 hours. 

FROZEN PUDDING. 

One quart cream whipped stiff. Divide in 3 parts; leave one 
white, color one pink with tablet that conies with gelatin pack- 
age; add chocolate to one; sweeten to taste; flavor with vanilla; 
roll fine 1 pound of stale macaroons, take 5 pound lard pail wet 
in cold water, put white cream in bottom, sprinkle a layer of 



130 ICES AND DESSERTS 

macaroons, then chocolate cream, layer of macaroons, then 
pink cream. Pack in ice cream freezer, and let it stand 5 hours. 
Remove from pail by placing it in warm water a second. Serve 
with sponge cake. Pretty, easy to make, and delicious A. L. B. 

FROZEN PUDDING. 

Boil 1 can of sliced pineapple cut very thin, and 1 cup of 
sugar, 5 minutes. Remove from fire and add 4 eggs well beaten. 
When cold add 1 pint of whipped coffee cream. Pack in ice 
and let freeze 3 or 4 hours. Mrs. E. B. G. 

RUBY SAUCE. 

Boil 1 cup of sugar, % cup of water, and a tablespoon of 
lemon juice to a thread. Take from the fire, and add % pint of 
strawberry juice or strawberry jelly. Use very cold. 

j STUFFED APPLES. 

Hollow out cores of good baking apples, stuff with mixture 
of chopped dates, nuts and figs and then bake them. Serve w r ith 
whipped cream and a big cherry on top of each. These make 
a most delicious dessert served with lady fingers. 

FRIED BANANAS. 

Slice bananas and put on platter; sprinkle with brown 
sugar and dots of butter. Put in oven and brown. Take from 
oven and squeeze V'z lemon over them. Pour on 3 tablespoons 
of caramel sauce, then put back in oven and bake from 10 to 
15 minutes. 

BAKED BANANAS. 

Put in oven and bake the same as potatoes. Cut a slit in 
top and open. Serve in skins. Nice for breakfast. A. B. 

BAKED PEACHES. 

Pare 6 nice peaches and push out the stones, keeping the 
peaches whole. Stand them in a granite or china baking-dish; 
fill the core spaces with chopped nuts; put % cup of water in 
the dish, dust with 4 tablespoons of sugar, and bake in a quick 
oven for 20 minutes, until the peaches are soft, but whole. 



ICES AND DESSERTS 131 

ADDITIONAL RECIPES 



Punch, Etc. 

FRUIT PUNCH For 25 Persons. 

Four cups sugar, 8 cups water, 2 quarts Apollinaris water, 
1 pineapple shredded, 1 cup fmit juice (any kind), 1 box straw- 
berries hulled and cut in pieces, 4 bananas cut in slices, juice 
of 6 oranges, juice of 3 lemons. Boil sugar and water 5 minutes. 
Add fruit, ice, Apollinaris and water to make punch right 
strength. One cup of Maraschino cherries may be added. 

GRAPE JUICE. 

Pick the grapes from the stems and put them into a clean 
saucepan with a pint of water to each 2 quarts of grapes; cover 
and heat slowly to the boiling point. When the mass is boiling 
hot throughout, turn it into a heavy bag to drain; when cool 
press out the juice remaining. Turn all the juice together, or 
keep that expressed by pressure by itself as a second quality of 
juice. Heat the juice to the boiling point, skim and store in 
fruit jars as in canning fruit. Sugar may be added to the juice 
if desired, but it is preferable to omit it. 

GRAPE COCKTAIL. 

Mix 8 tablespoons of grape juice with 2 tablespoons sugar 
syrup, 2 tablespoons lemon or 2 tablespoons pineapple juice; 
add 2 tablespoons seeded grapes. Pour into punch glasses that 
have been partly filled with cracked ice. 

ICED COCOA. 

Put 2 heaping teaspoons of cocoa into a double boiler, add 
gradually % pint of boiling w r ater; cook and stir 5 minutes, add 
2 pint of milk, beat thoroughly, take from the fire, and stand 
aside to cool. At serving time fill the glasses yj full of finely 
chopped ice, add a teaspoon of powdered sugar, fill the glass 
-A full of the cocoa, and fill the remaining % with whipped 
cream. A. L. B. 

TEMPERANCE PUNCH. 

One gallon water, 4 cups Karo (crystal white), 1 dozen 
lemons, % dozen o.-anges, 1 can pineapple. Cut pineapple into 



PUNCH, ETC. 133 

dice and pour syrup made from water, Karo and fruit juice over 
it. Fill bowl about % full of cracked ice, and add punch. K. 
K. B. 

CURRANT PUNCH For 25. 

Four cups currant juice, 4 cups sugar, 12 cups water, 6 
lemons (juice), 6 oranges (juice), 2 cups tea. Boil sugar and 
water 5 minutes, add tea, fruit juice, lemons and oranges and a 
large piece of ice. 

CURRANT PUNCH. 

Whip to a froth a tumbler of currant jelly, adding 1 pint 
of boiling water; add % cup of sugar and the juice of 1 lemon; 
put aside to cool. At serving time, add a quart of plain cold 
water, apollinaris, or other sparkling water. A. L. B. 

STRAWBERRY COCKTAILS. 

Slice large fine berries, cover them with orange juice, and 
stand on ice. Serve in stem-glass ice cream dishes, punch cups, 
or baskets made from the orange skins. Add a teaspoon of 
powdered sugar and a tablespoon of shaved ice to each portion. 
Serve with them a teaspoon and a berry fork. B. 

MINT PUNCH. 

From 12 stalks of mint, strip off the leaves, chop them very 
fine, and rub them to a paste, adding gradually 1 pint of cold 
water; add a pound of sugar; boil 5 minutes, and strain through 
a cheese cloth. When cold add the juice of 6 lemons. At serv- 
ing time turn this mixture into the punch bowl over a block of 
ice, throw in a few mint leaves and add sufficient apollinaris to 
make a palatable drink. A. L. B. 

MINT PUNCH, FROZEN. 

Strip the leaves from 2 dozen good stalks of mint, chop the 
leaves fine, and rub them to a pulp with % pound of sugar; add 
1 quart of water; bring to a boil, boil for 5 minutes; cool, and 
add three drops of vegetable green coloring and the juice of 2 
lemons; strain, and when cold freeze, turning slowly all the 
while. This will serve 8 persons. 

FROZEN PUNCH To Serve With Turkey. 

(This will make 3 quarts.) 

Boil 3 cups of white sugar and 1% pints of water together 
for 3 minutes. Remove from stove and add juice of 3 oranges 
and 3 lemons and juice of 1 bottle of maraschino cherries (25c), 



134 PUNCH, ETC. 

and 1 envelope of pink powder that comes with Knox's gelatin. 
(Dissolve powder in hot water.) When mixture has cooled, 
freeze. When nearly frozen add white of 1 egg which has been 
beaten with 1 teaspoon of sugar. Serve with turkey course, in 
sherbet cups, and put 2 cherries on top of each glass. Fine. 
Mrs. I. P. D. 

AMBROSIA. 

One pint sweet cream beaten stiff and flavored. Cut in %- 
inch squares pineapple, bananas, oranges and marshmallows. 
Add cream and serve in sherbet glasses with cherry on top. 
M. X. M. 



PUNCH, ETC. 135 

ADDITIONAL RECIPES 



Candy. 

FONDANT. 

Four cups of granulated sugar, iy 2 cups of cold water, J /4 
teaspoon of cream of tartar, or 3 drops of acetic acid. Stir the 
sugar and water in a saucepan, set on the back part of the 
range, until the sugar is melted, then draw the saucepan to a 
hotter part of the range, and stir until the boiling point is 
reached; add the cream of tartar or acid and, with the hand 
or a cloth wet repeatedly in cold water, wash down the sides 
of the saucepan, to remove any grains of sugar that have been 
thrown there. Cover the saucepan and let boil rapidly 3 or 
4 minutes. Remove the cover, set in the thermometer if one 
is to be used and let cook very rapidly to 240 degrees F., or 
the soft ball degree. Wet the hand in cold water and with it 
dampen a marble slab or a large platter, then without jarring 
the syrup turn it onto the marble or platter. Do not scrape 
out the saucepan or allow the last of the syrup to drip from it, 
as sugary portions will spoil the fondant by making it grainy. 
When the syrup is cold, with a metal scraper or a wooden 
spatula, turn the edges of the mass towards the center, and 
continue turning the edges in until the mass begins to thicken 
and grow white, then work it up into a ball, scraping all the 
sugar from the marble onto the mass; knead slightly, then cover 
closely with a heavy piece of cotton cloth wrung out of cold 
water. Let the sugar stand for an hour or longer to ripen, 
then remove the damp cloth and cut the mass into pieces; press 
these closely into a kitchen bowl, cover with a cloth wrung out 
of water (this cloth must not touch the fondant) and then with 
heavy paper. The fondant may be used the next day, but is in 
better condition after several days, and may be kept almost in- 
definitely, if the cloth covering be wrung out of cold water and 
replaced once in five or six days. Fondant may be used, white 
or delicately colored with vegetable color-pastes or with choco- 
late, as frosting for small cakes, or eclairs or for making candy 
"centers," to be coated with chocolate or with some of the same 
fondant tinted and flavored appropriately. W. B. 

CARAMELS. 

Two cups granulated sugar, 1% cups Karo, 2 cups cream, 1 
cup butter, 1 teaspoon vanilla, 1 cup chopped nuts. Cook sugar, 
Karo, % the cream and butter together. When it boils, stir in 



CANDY 137 

the rest of the cream, but do not allow boiling to cease. Test 
for a firm ball in cold water. Add vanilla and nut meats. Turn 
into buttered tin. When nearly cold, cut in cubes and wrap in 
waxed paper. The boiling sometimes requires nearly an hour, 
but when carefully made these caramels cannot be excelled. 

DIVINITY CANDY. 

Two cups white sugar, 1 cup brown sugar, % cup corn 
syrup, V-2 cup boiling water, % cup walnuts, Vz teaspoon vanilla, 
pinch of salt. Cook until brittle, then pour half of it over the 
well beaten whites of 3 eggs. Cook the rest of the syrup 5 or 
6 minutes longer and add the nuts just before pouring out into 
a platter. Don't stir while cooking. 

CHOCOLATE CREAMS. 

Make the fondant into little cones. Melt the chocolate in a 
small bowl, set in hot water; when it is liquid beat it with 
a teaspoon to make it glossy. Cover the cones smoothly with 
the chocolate, using the fingers, and set on waxed paper to dry. 

KLOPPENBERG TAFFY. 

One pint water, 3 cups sugar, small piece butter, 1 cup Karo 
syrup, 1 teaspoon cream tartar. Put sugar, water and cream 
tartar on to boil and let boil until crispy. Then add syrup and 
let all boil until brittle when tried in water. Before taking off, 
add butter and flavoring. Pour into buttered pans till cool 
enough for pulling E. C. 

DIVINITY CANDY. 

Two cups granulated sugar, % cup Karo syrup, 1 cup wal- 
nut kernels, 1 teaspoon vanilla, whites of 2 eggs. Boil sugar, 
syrup and water until it becomes a hard ball in cold water. 
Then pour over the beaten whites, a continual beating going on 
during the process. Then add nut kernels and vanilla, and beat 
well. Pour into buttered tins and when cool enough, mark into 
small blocks. E. C. 

DIVINITY CANDY. 

Three and one-half cups sugar, % cup of water, y$ cup of 
Karo corn syrup, % teaspoon cream tartar. Cook together and 
stir continually. Have ready beaten whites of 2 eggs, into 
which pour the mixture. When done sufficient to thread, add 
\V-i teaspoons vanilla and a cup of chopped walnuts. Good for 
cake filling also. L. G. 



138 CANDY 

TAFFY CANDY. 

Mix 2% cups granulated sugar, 2% tablespoons vinegar, y$ 
cup cold water. Put on the stove and heat slowly, stirring 
occasionally until the liquid becomes clear. Remove any grains 
of sugar from the sides of the pan or the spoon. Then let it 
come to a boil and do not stir after it begins to boil. When 
nearly done put in a piece of butter the size of a walnut. Test 
by dropping into cold water and when hard enough to pull (not 
brittle), pour out in a buttered platter. Use no spoon and do 
not let the last of the syrup drip from it as any sugary por- 
tions may cause the whole to become grainy. Pour over this a 
teaspoon of vanilla and sprinkle with a little baking powder. 
When sufficiently cool, pull until very white; place on bread 
board and cut into small pieces. S. I). 

FUDGE. 

One cup white sugar, 1 cup brown sugar, 1 tablespoon 
chocolate, 1 cup milk, 1 teaspoon butter. As soon as it begins 
to boil, add a pinch of salt and a pinch of soda. Let it boil for 
about 15 minutes. Beat it until it whips or gets stringy. Pour 
into buttered pans and cut into squares. Add raisins or currants 
if you wish. E. C. 

PEANUT BRITTLE. 

One and one-half cups sugar, */?, cup water, Vi cup of glucose 
(pure corn syrup), 2 level tablespoons butter, V-2 pound of raw 
shelled peanuts, 1 teaspoon vanilla extract, 1 level teaspoon of 
soda, 1 tablespoon of cold water. Put the sugar, water and glu- 
cose over the fire; stir till the sugar is dissolved; wash down the 
sides of the saucepan with a cloth or the fingers dipped in cold 
water, cover and let boil 3 or 4 minutes, then uncover and let 
cook to 275 degrees F., (when a little is cooled and chewed it 
clings but does not stick to the teeth), add the butter and pea- 
nuts and stir constantly until the peanuts are nicely browned 
(or are of the color of well roasted peanuts). Dissolve the soda 
in the cold water, add the vanilla and the soda and stir vigor- 
ously. When the candy is through foaming, turn it onto a warm 
and well-oiled marble or platter. As soon as it has cooled a 
little on the edges, take hold of it at the edge and pull out as 
thin as possible. Loosen it from the receptacle at the center by 
running a spatula under it, then turn the whole sheet upside 
down, and again pull as thin as possible. 

MARSHMALLOWS. 

Part one. Eight tablespoons cold water. Dissolve 1 pack- 
age Knox's sparkling gelatin and the color tablet. 



CANDY 139 

Part two. Four cups granulated sugar. Sixteen tablespoons 
water. Boil together 1 minute. Pour part one into part two, 
add 1 teaspoon vanilla, and beat without stopping until it is 
stiff'. Pour into shallow pan, cut in squares, and dip into pow- 
dered sugar. Mrs. H. N. B. 

CHOCOLATE POP CORN BALLS. 

One and one-half cups sugar, y 3 cup glucose, 2 /z cup water, 
% cup molasses, 3 tablespoons butter, 3 squares of Baker's Pre- 
mium No. 1 chocolate, 1 teaspoon of vanilla extract, about 4 quarts 
of popped corn, well salted. Set the sugar glucose and water over 
the fire, stir until the sugar is melted, then wash down the sides of 
the saucepan, cover and let boil 3 or 4 minutes, then remove the 
cover and let cook without stirring to the hard ball degree; add 
the molasses and butter and stir constantly until brittle in cold 
water; remove from the fire and, as soon as the bubbling ceases, 
add the chocolate, melted over hot water, and the vanilla; stir, 
to mix the chocolate evenly through the candy, then pour onto 
the popped corn, mixing the two together meanwhile. With 
buttered hands lightly roll the mixture into small balls. Press 
the mixture together only just enough to hold it in shape. Dis- 
card all the hard kernels *n the corn. Have the corn warm 
and in a warm bowl. 

SALTED ALMONDS. 

Shell and blanch the almonds by pouring boiling water over 
them and letting them stand until the skins slip off easily. Put 
1 cup of olive oil into a frying pan and when boiling hot drop 
in the almonds. Stir and shake the nuts constantly until they 
begin to turn light brown. Take them out with a skimmer and 
scatter on a cloth previously sprinkled with salt. Roll them 
until sufficiently salted, and if too salty rub in a clean cloth. 
Peanuts are equally good this way and the oil may be strained 
and used repeatedly. Mrs. O. M. M. 



140 



CANDY 
ADDITIONAL RECIPES 



Nyftee Mellow 

MARSHMALLOWS 



CAKES 



lOc Tins 



EATING TOASTING 

ALL QUALITY 

Seven Flavors 
Seven Colors 



Cracker Dishes. 

BREAKFAST RELISH. 

Butter crackers; put in pudding dish; chop ham; 1 layer 
of ham, 2 layers of crackers; season well; cover with milk; 
bake 20 minutes. A. L. B. 

CHILDREN'S DESSERT. 

Six soda crackers, pour over hot water to moisten; % cup 
sugar; flavor with vanilla; let cool; put in punch glasses with 
whipped cream on top. This dessert is always relished and 
thought by grown people to be more elaborate than it is. A. L. 
B. 

MARGUERITES (Cracker). 

White of 1 egg, 1 cup sugar (granulated), ~Vi cup chopped 
walnuts; beat egg; add sugar and nuts; spread on dainty chips 
or salteens and brown in hot oven. A. L. B. 

NEW ENGLAND CRACKER PUDDING. 

(New Hampshire Favorite) 

Six soda crackers, 2 eggs, 1 quart milk, 1 cup sugar, 1 cup 
raisins; flavor with nutmeg; break crackers in small pieces; 
soak in the milk 1 hour; beat eggs jut a little; add sugar and 
raisins; bake in slow oven until you can insert a knife and the 
pudding will not stick. A. L. B. 

SNACKS. 

Six soda crackers; butter; sprinkle thick with sugar and 
cinnamon; brown in hot oven. A. L. B. 

CHEESE CRACKERS. 

Butter soda crackers; either grate cheese or place lumps of 
cheese; brown in hot oven. A. L. B. 

JAM DELIGHT. 

Spread jam on crackers; place in hot oven 5 minutes. A. L. 
B. 

SARDINE SANDWICHES. 

Remove the bones from sardines; pour off the oil; to 1 can 
of sardines add 1 egg chopped fine, juice of 1 lemon, 6 ripe 
olives; mix well and spread between small crackers. A. L. B. 



Fireless Cooking. 



CREAM CHICKEN STEW. 



One 3 pound chicken, 1 cup sweet cream, 1 cup boiling 
water. Clean and cut up chicken; cook from 2 to 3 hours in 
caloric in 1 cup boiling water. Remove chickens; add cream to 
liquor; season with salt, pepper, paprika, and thicken with a 
little flour. Return chicken to the gravy and cook another hour 
in caloric. Mrs. H. K. 

JELLIED VEAL. 

Put a shank of veal into 1 auart of boiling water and 
cook in cooker 3 hours, using 1 radiator. When done, remove 
the bones, season the meat with salt, paprika, and celery salt. 
Place over a flame, stir with fork, until the water is nearly ab- 
sorbed. Turn into a dish and when cold cut in slices. Mrs. H. 
K. 

RARE ROAST BEEF. 

Melt a little butter in caloric-kettle, and sear the meat on 
all sides. Season to taste and remove to caloric, using two radi- 
ators sizzling hot. Allow 20 minutes to each pound of meat. 
After removing the meat, thicken the gravy and boil slightly. 
Mrs. H. K. 

BAKED BEANS. 

One quart white beans, % pound salt pork, 3 tablespoons 
molasses (N. O.), 2 teaspoons salt, 1 teaspoon mustard. Wash 1 
quart of beans; soak them over night. In the morning drain 
off the water; cover with boiling water; add 1 pinch of soda; 
cook 1 hour in caloric using 1 radiator. Remove and drain 
well. Put them in baking pan with salt pork. Put molasses, 
salt, and mustard in a cup, which fill with cold water. Pour 
this mixture over the beans. Bake in caloric basket 6 hours, 
using 2 radiators. Mrs. H. K. 

GREEN PEAS. 

Shell; add a very little salted water and cook in caloric V-2 
hour. One cup full of water is sufficient for 3 pints of shelled 
peas. Cover with a sauce made of cream or milk and butter 
slightly thickened with flour. Mrs. H. K. 



FIRELESS COOKING 143 

ONIONS. 

Cover onions with boiling water and allow them to boil 5 
minutes. Drain; add fresh hot water and heat to boiling point. 
Cook in caloric 1 hour. When ready to serve drain and pour 
cream sauce over them. Mrs. H. K. 

BOILED RICE. 

One cup washed rice, 2 cups boiling water, 1 level teaspoon 
salt. Put boiling water and rice together, remove to caloric and 
cook 1 hour. Mrs. H. K. 

OLD FASHIONED OATMEAL. 

One cup oatmeal, 3% cups water, 1% teaspoons salt. Stir 
the cereal slowly into the water and place in caloric for 5 
hours. Mrs. H. K. 

ROLLED WHEAT. 

One cup wheat, 2% cups boiling water, 1 teaspoon salt. 
Treat like old fashioned oatmeal. Mrs. H. K. 

RICE SOUP WITH TOMATOES. 

Six tomatoes, 1 onion, Vz cup rice, \V-2 quarts of stock, 2 
tablespoons butter. Stew tomatoes with sliced onion in a very 
little water. Rub through a colander. Heat butter. Add to- 
matoes and also add the well washed rice. Add the heated 
stock. Remove to cooker for 1 hour. Mrs. H. K. 

STOCK. 

Six pounds beef, 3 quarts water, 6 whole cloves, 6 pepper- 
corns, 1 bay leaf. Cut meat in small pieces, add cold water 
and spices; heat slowly and remove to cooker, cooking 6 hours, 
using 1 radiator. When cold remove all fat and strain. The 
stock will form a jelly and can be kept for days in a cool place. 
Mrs. H. K. 



Table of Weights and Measures. 

One saltspoon equals quarter teaspoon 

Three teaspoons one tablespoon 

Sixteen tablespoons one cup 

Two gills one cup 

One wineglass half gill 

Two tablespoons butter one ounce 

Two tablespoons granulated sugar one ounce 

Four cups sifted pastry flour one pound 

Two cups butter one pound 

Two cups granulated sugar one pound 

Two cups chopped meat one pound 

Two cups rice one pound 

Four cups sifted flour one pound 

Eight ordinary eggs or 10 small eggs one pound 



Webster 5tu6io 

517-519 Fourteenth Street 
Phone Oakland 1527 



Fine Photographs 

Taken in your home if you prefer 



Miscellaneous. 



TWENTY USES OF THE LEMON. 

Few people realize the value of lemons, which can not be 
overestimated. In cases of fever, sore throat or torpid liver the 
medicinal qualities are unexcelled. 

1. Two or three slices of lemon in a cup of hot, strong 
tea will cure a nervous headache. 

2. A teaspoon of lemon juice in a cup of black coffee will 
relieve a billious headache. 

3. The juice of half a lemon in a cup of hot water on 
awakening in the morning is an excellent liver corrective and 
successful substitute for calomel and other alterative drugs. 

4. A dash of lemon juice in plain water makes a cleansing 
tooth wash, not only removing the tartar, but sweetening the 
breath. 

5. A lotion of lemon juice and rose water will remove tan 
and whiten the skin. 

G. Lemon juice with olive oil is far superior to vinegar 
for salad dressing equal parts used for blending. 

7. Lemon juice and loaf sugar is good for hoarseness. 

8. Outward applications of the juice allays irritation caused 
by insect bites. 

9. A refreshing drink is made by adding a freshly beaten 
egg to lemonade, and 

10. The same mixture when frozen makes a delicious ice. 

11. If when boiling sago or rice a teaspoon of lemon juice 
is added the kernels will be whiter and a delicate flavor is 
added. 

12. An old fashioned remedy for croup is lemon juice, 
honey and alum. 

13. We all know the value of lemon juice and salt for 
removing rust stains from white goods. 

14. After the juice is extracted the rind dipped in salt 
cleanses brass beautifully and conveniently. 

15. It also removes unsightly stains from the hands. 

16. For flavoring cookery lemon juice is unexcelled. 

17. After the pulp is removed the skins make dainty recep- 
tacles for serving salads, ices, etc. 

18. Tough meat can be made tender by adding a teaspoon 
of lemon juice to the water in which it is boiled. 

19. Slices of lemon garnish fish of all description. 



146 MISCELLANEOUS 

20. Tea is greatly improved by the addition of a slice of 
lemon, either iced for summer's use or as Russian tea on a cold 
winter day. 

In buying lemons select those having a thin, dry rind. They 
are cheaper and are much jucier than the fresh, plump ones. 
Mrs. J. J. O'C. 

TO SHARPEN SCISSORS. 

Cut them rapidly on the neck of a small glass bottle, or on 
a ground glass stopper. It trues the edges and makes them cut 
like new. Another way is to place the scissors upon an ordinary 
knife as if in the act of cutting. By drawing the steel along 
the blades in this manner several times you will sharpen your 
scissors. 

WHEN THE LAYERS SLIDE. 

Almost everyone has the experience, when filling and icing 
a layer cake, of the layers slipping and sliding, thereby causing 
an unattractive-looking cake when dry. If you will stick two 
or even three of the skewers used by butchers down through 
the layers they will hold the cake beautifully in place until set. 

REMOVING FRUIT STAINS 

from table linen may be much more easily done if the 
stained part is stretched tight in an embroidery frame placed 
over a basin and boiling water poured upon it. Taking out 
fruit stains with boiling water is an old and valuable piece of 
knowledge, but the use of an embroidery frame to support the 
article probably will be a new suggestion to most housekeepers. 

WASHING WHITE SILK GLOVES. 

At night is recommended as a means of keeping them from 
turning yellow. White silk stockings also should be treated in 
the same way. Wash both in warm not hot suds, using a 
good soap. Rinse well and hang on a rack to dry. By morning 
they will be ready to use. 

When using bottled blueing, the common tendency to pour 
in too much can be overcome by tying about four thicknesses of 
old muslin over the neck of the bottle. This causes the blueing 
to filter, so that you can put in just the right amount. 

ODORLESS GASOLENE CLEANING. 

When washing articles in gasolene pour in a few drops of 
oil of sassafras, about five drops to a quart of gasolene. This 
will destroy all odor, and the garment washed can be pressed 
and worn as soon as the gasolene evaporates, thus eliminating 
the lengthy airing process. 



Table of Contents. 

Page. 

Soups 13- 1C 

Fish 18- 20 

Fowl 22- 24 

Meats and Accompaniments 27- 33 

Vegetables 35- 43 

Salads 45- 50 

Entrees ; .... 52- 56 

Eggs 58- 59 

Cheese and Chafing Dish 61- 64 

Conserves, Jams, Etc ." 66- 70 

Bread 72- 79 

Waffles and Pan Cakes 81- 82 

Sandwiches 84- 85 

Pies and Pastry 88- 92 

Puddings and Other Desserts 94-103 

Cakes 105-111 

Layer Cakes 115-120 

Cookies and Small Cakes 122-126 

Ices and Cold Desserts 128-130 

Punch, etc .... 132-134 

Candy 136-139 

Cracker Dishes 141 

Fireless Cooking 142-143 

Tafcle of Weights and Measures 144 

Miscellaneous .. .. 145-146 



BOWMAN DRUG CO. 

Berkeley Store 
S. E. Cor. Center and Shattuck 



Phone Berkeley 113 



G. J. Flaherty 



L, S. Flaherty 



North Gate Grocery 

FANCY AND STAPLE 
GROCERIES 

3076 Claremont Avenue 
Berkeley, Gal. 

Phones: Berkeley 7796 7797 



Phone Berkeley 954 J. Hansen 

Elmwood Fruit Market 

Wholesale and Retail Dealers in 

Fresh Fruits, Vegetables 

Canned Goods, Dried Fruits, etc. 
Butter and Eggs. 

2648 Ashby Avenue 

Near College Ave. 

Orders Promptly Delivered 



Phone Berkeley 2535 

ML Nina Williams 

ARTISTIC MILLINER 

2202 Shattuck Avenue 
Shattuck Hotel Building 

Berkeley, Gal. 

(Top j? (Bown 

BERKELEY'S WAIST SHOP 

Agents for Pictorial Review 
Patterns 

Fownes Gloves, Phoenix Hosiery 

Bon Ton and Royal Worcester 
Corsets 

2142 Center St. Berkeley 




Like cut $100.00 



Victor - Victrolas 

AT 

Tupper & Reed's 

(Berkeley's Music Dealers) 

2237 Shattuck Ave., Berkeley 
Sold on easy terms 



W. Co BLACK 

FUEL, FEED AND ICE 

SATISFACTION GUARANTEED 



Telephone Berkeley 159 

SHATTUCK AND ASH BY AVENUE 



White 

Diamond 

Water 

Co. 

ELECTRICALLY PURIFIED 

Drinking Water 

Phone Piedmont 1720 




L. KIRKHAM 

Job Plumbing and Supply Co. 

Auto Sundries and 

Electrical Supplies 
General Repairing. 
2930 College at Ashby. 

Phone Berkeley 8700. 



"If you have beauty, come, I'll 

take it; 
If you have none, come, I'll make 

it." 



Portrait Photographer 

2121 Center St., Berkeley, Cal. 
Phone Berkeley 4941 



CALL UP OAKLAND 489 



FOR 



Daily wagon service in Berkeley, Oakland and Alameda 



Get the BEST results 
by USING 



Pied. 70 



41st & Market 
Oakland 




PASTEURIZED 

MILK 



M. SILVERMAN 
GROCERIES 

Lehnhardt's Ice Cream and 

Candies. 

Butter, Eggs, Milk and Cream. 
Daily Papers and Magazines 

Stationery, Post Cards. 
Bakery Goods Cigars and 

Tobacco. 
Telephone Berkeley 1758. 

3084 Claremont Ave. 
BERKELEY California 



Oakland 

White Star 

Laundry 

Quality and Care 

Fortieth and Broadway 
Phone Piedmont 308 



YE RXA 

Try Our Hoffman House Coffee, 32c 

Bread 8c (2 for 15c) 
Berkeley's Biggest and Best (lOc loaf) 

2109 BANCROFT WAY, NEAR SHATTUCK 

Eight Stores in Berkeley 



Orders Called For and Delivered. 

CENTRAL MARKET 

H. J. REISMANN, Prop. 

FRESH AND SALT MEATS 

Poultry Fish Every Friday. 

2637 Ashby Ave., Berkeley, Cal. 

Phone Berkeley 8706. 



The success of your cooking depends upon the material 
used. Milk, cream, butter and eggs play a very important part. 
Why not have the best? 

Varsity Creamery Co. 

2113 University Avenue 

Phone Berkeley 65 



+*.. 




Leslie Salt Refining Company 

San Mateo 



Freely Flowing 

i 

Simply Snowing j 
Without a Fault 



LESLIE SALT 



"THE PROOF OF THE PUDDING." 

Try Our Banking Service 
Checking Accounts 

Safe Deposit Boxes 

Savings Accounts 

Homestead Savings Bank 

Shattuck Avenue, next to Public Library 
Berkeley, Gal. 




Berkeley National Bank 

Affiliated with 
UNIVERSITY SAVINGS BANK 



We cordially invite both your Household 
Checking and Savings Acounts 

East side Shattuck and Center Sts. 




Berkeley 
Furniture 
Company 

The House of Quality and Low 
Prices. 

C. J. HERRICK, Prop. 

STICKLEY FURNITURE 

-At- 
REDUCED PRICES. 

2075-81 Allston Way 
Rear Peoples Water Co.'s Office 

Telephone Berkeley 2414. 



We don't know 
much about Cook- 

ing, but WE DO 
KNOW the 

CORSET 
Business 

We have a Cor- 
set to fit any fig- 
ure at a price to 
fit any purse. 

1 00 Models. 
Prices, $ 1 to $ I 5 

Corsets made to 
order. Expert fit- 
ters at your serv- 
ice. 




POMIN 



TWO STORES 
243 POST ST. 
893 MARKET 



ST. 



SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 




iHOTOGRAPHS 

Charmingly posed and 
beautifully finished in 
soft brown tones 

Also in permanent Oil Colors 

E. J. McCULLAGH 

2039 Shattuck (at Addison) 
Hotel Berkeley 



BOREN'S 



Stamping 
Books 



Art Needle Work 
Stationery 

Gifts for All Occasions 



Orders Taken for High-Class 
Embroidery. 

2409 Shattuck Ave., Berkeley. 



Richards & Davenport 

GROCERS 

Fancy Groceries, Fruits and 
Vegetables 



2113 VINE STREET 

Phone Berkeley 917 



Government Inspected Meats. 



Phone Berkeley 6735 



Success in Cooking 

can only be obtained by using the best grade of 
meat, which is furnished at low prices by 



The Ideal Market 

The market with the 100'/ sanitary inspection score. 



1677 Shattuck Avenue 
BERKELEY, GAL. 



H. L. REID 



R. L. REID 



REID'S DRUGS 

The Modern Cut-Rate Pharmacy 
At Telegraph and Durant 

iiiiiiiiiii 

Victor 

Talking Machines 




Victrolas from $15 to $400 

Records and Supplies 

Special Uo>m for 
Demonstration 



EASTMAN KODAKS AND SUPPLIES 



Expert Developing and Printing. 

'iiiiiiiiiiiNiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiimimmiiiiiii 

Pig'n Whistle Candies 

Fresh Every Day 



24 Hour Service 



llll IIIIIIHIIIIIIIUIIIIIIIIIIIIII 



LADIES' REST ROOM 






Free and Prompt Delivery 

To All Parts of Berkeley 




M 

PHONES BERKELEY 1910 AND 8835 



\n\ BERTIN'S 



Promptness and Quality 



BERTIN'S \n\ 



PQ 



Carelessness and Lack of Preparation 
Spoils Many a Splendid Recipe 

THE SAME CAN BE SAID ABOUT YOUR 
GOWNS AND HOUSEHOLD FURNISHINGS 



OUR 
MOT TO 

WHAT IS WORTH 
DOING AT ALL IS 
WOPTM DOING 
WELL J St. jt 




CLEANERS 

DYERS 

PRESSERS 



Bear a reputation for being the best prepared 
to renovate your Garments, Gowns, or sani- 
tarily clean your Blankets, Portieres and 
Curtains. 



TELEPHONE BERKELEY 5592 

For all Departments. Five Stores. 

Ten Delivery Vehicles. 



Vl 



BERTIN'S 



Charges Most Reasonable 



BERTIN'S